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Bruce Banner

Get On The Ladder Now Or You May Never Be Able To.

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"Get on the ladder now or you may never be able to". Is what buyers have been saying to BBC News' business reporter in their latest piece of ramping following high October lending figures, the highest since 2008 :rolleyes:.

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"Get on the ladder now or you may never be able to". Is what buyers have been saying to BBC News' business reporter in their latest piece of ramping following high October lending figures, the highest since 2008 :rolleyes:.

I have already missed the boat for things like becoming a ballet dancer or an astronaut. If homeowner has now been added to the already long and growing list of things I won't be able to do then I will just have to move on and focus on realistic goals such as expanding my business or becoming happy.

Another option though, could be that it's all cobblers and the magic hpi boat's engines will eventually go full astern.

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"Get on the ladder now or you may never be able to". Is what buyers have been saying to BBC News' business reporter in their latest piece of ramping following high October lending figures, the highest since 2008 :rolleyes:.

I often wonder what the legal aspect of the BBC's ramping is. You pay these people for advice via the licence fee (even under threat of imprisonment or a hefty fine if you don't). They are providing financial advice by suggesting an asset price will be higher in the future - if you take the bait but house prices tumble, can you sue for damages?

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"Get on the ladder now or you may never be able to". Is what buyers have been saying to BBC News' business reporter in their latest piece of ramping following high October lending figures, the highest since 2008 :rolleyes:.

Who are the going to sell to if no one can get on the pyramid ?

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Answer: You don't sell. You hang onto the thing for the rest of your life.

Even though the only thing you can afford is an ex council flat in the town of Scumton.

The media sound exactly like they did in 2007.

The game is up.

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One of our EAs made sense, for the most part, in a local newspaper housing-insert last week. 14 Nov 2013

"People should not be so obsessed with house prices" along with a few other things, wanting more transactions. Hopefully they'll be right about more supply coming to market - although I'm hoping it will come from equity rich trying/needing to sell.

Scanned it in to Regional forum the other day, and other than the front-page, don't want to repost article-images in full again on this thread: http://www.housepric...ost&p=909432017

h2wu.jpg

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More than just a hint of desperation in the air.

My local paper

:D

Mr Williams also believes the market is likely to continue to grow and banks are likely to loosen their purse strings having built up capital over the past few years. He said: “There’s no doubt about it, now is the time to buy. Interest rates are likely to rise soon as unemployment continues to fall and that will impact lending rates.”

It may also impact prices/values Harvey. Banks are desperate to lend but you also need willing borrowers who are credit-worthy Harvey, wanting to meet your asking prices.

He picked up an award in 2010 for services to property. He might want to consider what he was saying back in year 2000 as some of it applicable today, including 'buyer fatigue'. Back from when the market was settling out from being overpriced, with less debt required for buyers.

2000 http://www.cwn.org.uk/business/a-z/r/rics/2000/08/000822-house-sales.htm

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Your feudal overlord.

Even the local feudal overlord will want a decent rate of return.

Though I can see the last roll of the dice will be the government becoming the buyer of last resort, (at last peak +10%) in order to keep the delusion intact.

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Even the local feudal overlord will want a decent rate of return.

Though I can see the last roll of the dice will be the government becoming the buyer of last resort, (at last peak +10%) in order to keep the delusion intact.

They already are through the back door.Our local ALMO (council house provider and massive pensions/holidays/sick pay provider for staff) has been buying up ex council houses from people.One lady I know had MEWed her right to buy council house up from £14k she bought it for to £66k for holidays to Florida etc.

She lost her tax credits when her youngest left school and couldn't pay her mortgage/other debts and the ALMO has bought her house.They have bough 36 so far this year,33 of them ex right to buy council houses.

The ALMO in question sold those houses under its past guise and is buying them back for 4x the price they sold them for.

Its a huge scam.

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Your feudal overlord.

Endgame is that a small number of corporations own the housing stock; with new builds kept to a minimum, they can keep the price of property at insane levels indefinitely.

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Even the local feudal overlord will want a decent rate of return.

Though I can see the last roll of the dice will be the government becoming the buyer of last resort, (at last peak +10%) in order to keep the delusion intact.

The participation rate was dropping throughout the boom a trend that seems set to continue, and probably even accelerate.

http://www.ons.gov.uk/ons/rel/census/2011-census-analysis/a-century-of-home-ownership-and-renting-in-england-and-wales/short-story-on-housing.html

acenturyofhousing_tcm77-307080.png

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"Get on the ladder now or you may never be able to". Is what buyers have been saying to BBC News' business reporter in their latest piece of ramping following high October lending figures, the highest since 2008 :rolleyes:.

Unless there a humungous crash, places like Belgravia and Kensington, which were affordable 20-22 years ago on a typical professional salary, will never come back into range. The post WW2 period was a temporary aberration, and won't happen again without such a similar big shock. There is lots of new money from E Europe, Asia, S America, and Africa that can now out-compete the English in the best parts of the South-East. Same story in Hong Kong Mid-Levels and Manhattan's mid-town. They are never coming back in house price range without a war.

On the other hand, some places have fallen off their perch, but remain in absolute terms hugely expensive. For example Warlingham (all of South Croydon Borough), is not the premium location it was 25 years ago. Still nice and pricey, but no longer top of the league.

When there is a HPC it may happen more in China, Brazil, and India, not England. As long as we remain internationally attractive we'll be priced out. Another bout of blitz, Nazis invasion threat, and mass loss of life is what it would take to bring prices down to post WW2 levels. Or, the government could agreed to let us build some houses - far preferable.

Notice that in Manhattan the Mayor's party is just rezoning to build higher in some areas, which helps a little, but help developers more.

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