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Is A Good Job Being Done In Afganistan?

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Isn't that one of the 'reasons' we went in there? To eradicate the opium trade? :huh:

Er, no, the taliban had done that. Our allies, the warlords, once freed of the deleterious influence of the religious autocrats, resurrected it.

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Considering its one of the most widely used pain killers around the planet. And this country is expert at producing it. And there is very little economy in this country for people to get into.

Well call me crazy but how about they grow it and export it to the rest of us.

Oh no - that's common sense. So not gonna happen. Got to love the human race. We are total losers.

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Er, no, the taliban had done that. Our allies, the warlords, once freed of the deleterious influence of the religious autocrats, resurrected it.

Er, actually, no, it was one of the reasons, along with eliminating terrorism, that the army were sent in by Tony Bliar to Afghanistan to "do some stuff" in the words of Tim Collins.

According to the US Department of state International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs paper. (http://www.state.gov/documents/organization/142643.pdf)

"Myth No. 7: The narcotics trade and the Taliban-led insurgency are unrelated or only tangentially related. The counternarcotics effort wastes precious resources that would be better spent fighting the insurgency.

Fact:

The opium trade and the insurgency are closely related. Poppy cultivation and insurgent violence are correlated geographically, and opium now provides the Taliban with a significant portion of its revenues.

• The UNODC and other major international stakeholders all acknowledge that the Taliban-led insurgency and the Afghan drugs trade are increasingly linked.

• In 2009, after NATO defense ministers agreed that ISAF could play a role in counternarcotics in Afghanistan, NATO issued an order for ISAF to target drug traffickers and drug-producing labs where there is evidence that they provide “material support” for the Taliban-led insurgency.

• The links between the insurgency and the drug trade are especially strong in contested areas of the south, where drug proceeds provide a substantial amount of insurgent revenue. As found elsewhere in the world, the illegal drug trade is strongest in areas where security and rule of law are weak. It sustains and promotes lawless activity, corrodes good governance, and threatens to undermine the legitimate Afghan government and our efforts to assist it in waging a counterinsurgency."

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certainly the opium growing business seems to be in good order

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-asia-24919056

Trans-Afghan pipeline on its way - tick

Afghanistan's trillion dollar mineral reserves secured and kept out of Chinese hands - tick

Iran almost completely encircled - tick

Iran awash in heroin - tick

NATO bases in the heart of Asia/ The Great Game back on big time - tick

What's not to like? Another one of those tragic errors of judgement that make the people responsible for those errors a packet.

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Er, actually, no, it was one of the reasons, along with eliminating terrorism,

If that's meant to be ironic, it's a bit on the subtle side.

Opium production fell to historic lows under the taliban, who regarded it as un-islamic and who took their religion seriously.

I don't know whether what's happened since is merely a reversion towards historic norms, or whether there's a deliberate element of resistance to the western invader and/or to religious oppression in the business. Of course since the invasion many western commentators slap the label "taliban" indiscriminately on anyone they don't like (not to mention innocent Pashtun peasants they've slaughtered), so you'll no doubt see stories associating drug-lords with "the taliban".

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If that's meant to be ironic, it's a bit on the subtle side.

Opium production fell to historic lows under the taliban, who regarded it as un-islamic and who took their religion seriously.

I don't know whether what's happened since is merely a reversion towards historic norms, or whether there's a deliberate element of resistance to the western invader and/or to religious oppression in the business. Of course since the invasion many western commentators slap the label "taliban" indiscriminately on anyone they don't like (not to mention innocent Pashtun peasants they've slaughtered), so you'll no doubt see stories associating drug-lords with "the taliban".

I think bossybabe relied a little too much on the US rationalisation for starting this mess. Like Iraq, this is all about oil and geo-politics, especially the US not wanting the Argentinian company Bridas to gain control of the pipeline bringing Caspian oil to the coast.

Bridas and Unocal still fighting over Turkmenistan-Pakistan pipeline

Nov. 5, 1997 Hearings are still going on in a lawsuit of Argentine oil and gas firm Bridas S.A.. against Unocal Corp.

The chief of Bridas' Afghan operations, meanwhile, said earlier this week that his company was close to signing a pipeline agreement with the Taliban, the Islamic movement that controls large parts of Afghan territory, including virtually all the proposed pipeline route. He said Bridas would start construction as soon as the deal is signed.

Sugar Land, Texas, Oct. 5, 1998 - Unocal Corporation today said that the Texas District Court in Fort Bend County has granted the company's request for summary judgement and dismissed the lawsuit filed by Bridas Corporation.

"We are pleased that the court has granted our request," said Roger C. Beach, Unocal chairman and chief executive officer. "From the outset, we have maintained that we did not interfere with Bridas' business and it was inappropriate for them to sue Unocal in the United States concerning business activities in Turkmenistan and Afghanistan."

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If that's meant to be ironic, it's a bit on the subtle side.

Opium production fell to historic lows under the taliban, who regarded it as un-islamic and who took their religion seriously.

I don't know whether what's happened since is merely a reversion towards historic norms, or whether there's a deliberate element of resistance to the western invader and/or to religious oppression in the business. Of course since the invasion many western commentators slap the label "taliban" indiscriminately on anyone they don't like (not to mention innocent Pashtun peasants they've slaughtered), so you'll no doubt see stories associating drug-lords with "the taliban".

Sorry you missed the irony. Look at the date and authors of the quote.

The problem with eliminating poppy growing is that we have no substitute for the farmers to grow. Perhaps we should encourage them to grow biofuels. They have to make a living.

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Sorry you missed the irony. Look at the date and authors of the quote.

The problem with eliminating poppy growing is that we have no substitute for the farmers to grow. Perhaps we should encourage them to grow biofuels. They have to make a living.

perhaps they could grow food to eat?

As for the idiocy about the drug trade aiding the Taliban...well, the Taliban are the locals, and they are fighting an invading force...how else are they going to buy arms...I mean, unlike Syria where we supplied both sides, the Taliban are going to have to buy their own.

We should be out of there.

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perhaps they could grow food to eat?

As for the idiocy about the drug trade aiding the Taliban...well, the Taliban are the locals, and they are fighting an invading force...how else are they going to buy arms...I mean, unlike Syria where we supplied both sides, the Taliban are going to have to buy their own.

We should be out of there.

I do agree. Farmers don't make much money from growing poppies. Most of that goes to the drug lords/local barons. They make even less from growing food.

Afghanistan is and always has been a basket case. We should have learned the lessons of history and KEPT OUT!

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A mate of mine who has served out there was under no illusion as to why Helmand province was the centre of allied operations. It was the biggest poppy producer, neatly taken over by the US forces as soon as the Taliban were mostly kicked out.

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Another misguided foreign adventure.

We should have let the yanks bomb the Taliban out of existence then given it to Pakistan as a province.

...it's deliberately misguided,don't ya know.

a smokescreen

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Er, actually, no, it was one of the reasons, along with eliminating terrorism, that the army were sent in by Tony Bliar to Afghanistan to "do some stuff" in the words of Tim Collins.

According to the US Department of state International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs paper. (http://www.state.gov/documents/organization/142643.pdf)

"Myth No. 7: The narcotics trade and the Taliban-led insurgency are unrelated or only tangentially related. The counternarcotics effort wastes precious resources that would be better spent fighting the insurgency.

Fact:

The opium trade and the insurgency are closely related. Poppy cultivation and insurgent violence are correlated geographically, and opium now provides the Taliban with a significant portion of its revenues.

• The UNODC and other major international stakeholders all acknowledge that the Taliban-led insurgency and the Afghan drugs trade are increasingly linked.

• In 2009, after NATO defense ministers agreed that ISAF could play a role in counternarcotics in Afghanistan, NATO issued an order for ISAF to target drug traffickers and drug-producing labs where there is evidence that they provide “material support” for the Taliban-led insurgency.

• The links between the insurgency and the drug trade are especially strong in contested areas of the south, where drug proceeds provide a substantial amount of insurgent revenue. As found elsewhere in the world, the illegal drug trade is strongest in areas where security and rule of law are weak. It sustains and promotes lawless activity, corrodes good governance, and threatens to undermine the legitimate Afghan government and our efforts to assist it in waging a counterinsurgency."

That rather depends on whether you believe the line being spun to you by the US government Narc agencies and all the other vested interests that were so keen to get us involved in Afghanistan.

Alternatively you could try reading books such as Frank Lewidges 'Losing Small Wars' which basically show that it has been a f*ck up from start to finish particularly for the British military

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