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SickofRenting

Philippines Disaster Emergency Funds

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Sorry to sound harsh, As the post suggests, they do not need cash, they need only food, water and some form of shelter, I don't understand why the emergency relief funds have not got this already stockpiled to send wherever disater strikes.

I just feel any donations made will not reach the intended recipient these days. - the same with all charities.

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Telegraph blog: The UN came to Haiti and left behind a disaster. Let's hope they don't do the same after Typhoon Haiyan

A few key lessons can be learnt from the searing experience of Haiti, when no one would seriously deny that the humanitarian response went badly wrong.

First of all, forget about the headline figures for the amount of aid that will now be pledged for the Philippines. Between 2010 and 2012, the world promised $9.3 billion for Haiti, but even on the most generous estimate, only about half of this was ever delivered. Much of this sum was just creative accounting. Countries would write off debts that Haiti was never going to repay anyway, or bring forward aid donations that they planned to make in any event – and all of that was cleverly rolled into the headline number....

...the second lesson: the quantity of aid that gets delivered to the Philippines doesn’t matter: all that counts is the amount that finds it way into the hands of those in need.

In Haiti, hundreds of aid agencies sent supplies to Toussaint L’Ouverture airport in Port-au-Prince – and much of it got no further. In the weeks after the earthquake, prodigious quantities of food and medical equipment piled up at the airport, filling hangar after hangar, while people were dying for want of basic essentials barely a mile away...

...How did this happen? The UN and many aid agencies are not anxious to publicise this fact, but they tend to be in the wholesale and not the retail business when it comes to humanitarian response. They deliver essential material, but they leave the actual distribution to someone else, usually the national government. That’s fine if disaster strikes in a country with a strong and efficient state. In Haiti, however, the government barely functioned at the best of times. After an earthquake which had pulverised just about every ministry, along with the presidential palace and parliament, the state didn’t work at all.

A few days after the tremor, I accompanied a UN convoy laden with enough blankets and other basic essentials for 25,000 people as it inched its way through the ruins of Port-au-Prince. It was escorted (quite unnecessarily) by Brazilian peacekeeping troops, because we were all told the city was terribly dangerous. It wasn’t, but never mind.

Instead of handing out the stuff out to people who needed it, the entire consignment was unloaded at a primary school and left in the care of a “committee” of a dozen city councillors and sundry other worthies. What they did with it is anyone’s guess. Even if they weren’t minded to steal everything, the idea that this collection of local potentates had the transport and logistics to hand it all out was obviously absurd. Nonetheless, at the briefing the following morning, a UN spokesman proudly announced that enough aid for 25,000 people had been delivered.

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Sorry to sound harsh, As the post suggests, they do not need cash, they need only food, water and some form of shelter, I don't understand why the emergency relief funds have not got this already stockpiled to send wherever disater strikes.

I just feel any donations made will not reach the intended recipient these days. - the same with all charities.

X

Some of them do have emergency supplies stockpiled, but things like rice or water may well be sourced more easily and cheaply in the area rather than from many thousands of miles away. The biggest problem after such a disaster is usually actually transporting the supplies, when roads are washed away or otherwise impassable.

My daughter works for one of the big charities - no, she does not earn a big salary - she was hands on after the tsunami and the Haiti earthquake and is out in the Philippines now, on the case. Her chief concern is emergency food and livelihoods, and she is working flat out with the local team to do whatever they can. One of the first things they organised after Haiti was simple canteens where people who had lost everything were assured of at least one good hot meal a day.

It is vey easy to criticise, but I think that for anyone who has never seen the aftermath of such a disaster it is impossible to imagine the difficulties. As for cash, in fact people who have lost everything, including their means of earning a living, do need a certain amount, usually relatively small, in order to replace basics like clothes and tools, and it may be better for a devastated local economy to support that rather than bring in everything from far away.

I dare say many on here will still believe the money will be wasted no matter what I say, but my daughter would certainly not still be with this major UK organisation if she did not believe that people's hard earned money was put to good use. She is not some woolly, earnest do gooder, far from it. She is an intensely hard working practical type who loathes incompetence, inefficiency and money being wasted.

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I personally would recommend instead of donating to a specific Philippines Appeal donate to the same charities (MSF / Oxfam / Red Cross etc) without restrictions on where it should be spent.

Probably more important than money after disaster strikes is emergency supplies and infrastructure set up in advance. That's the stuff that get's through in the first days and weeks.

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I personally would recommend instead of donating to a specific Philippines Appeal donate to the same charities (MSF / Oxfam / Red Cross etc) without restrictions on where it should be spent.

Probably more important than money after disaster strikes is emergency supplies and infrastructure set up in advance. That's the stuff that get's through in the first days and weeks.

Yes, there are supplies already available, since heavy rain and flooding are a regular occurrence in the Philippines. My daughter's org. has for years had a local team and supplies ready to go, but this sort of thing is so much worse than the usual. Recent brief email said that among other things they are organising shelter for some 50,000 people.

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