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Chim-Chim Kerching! The Return Of The Chimney Sweep

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http://www.telegraph.co.uk/finance/festival-of-business/10436774/Chim-Chim-Kerching-The-return-of-the-chimney-sweep.html

Thousands of Brits are dusting out their fireplaces in response to soaring energy prices creating an unexpected boom in chimney sweeps.

Recent energy price hikes have added 10pc -15pc to gas and electricity bills across the country and a furious British public has reacted by switching off radiators, calling in the chimney sweeps, and stoking up the wood fires.

Kyran Ryan has been sweeping chimneys in the Coventry area for seven years. The last year has seen the largest single rise in call-outs of his career. “Every time the gas bill goes up, demand goes up,” he said. “I’m working 12-13 hours a day at the moment. I don’t physically have time to fit all the customers in.”

Wow. Drain rods / sweep brush.

I wonder what this means for the CO2 emission targets if people are switching to log burners etc... I must admit I want to go down this road the issue I've got is that some previous idiot who owned the house sealed up the chimney in the back room so I need to remove the existing chimney pot and put in a new one before I can get one. Hopefully I can get that sorted next summer.

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I wonder what this means for the CO2 emission targets if people are switching to log burners etc... I must admit I want to go down this road the issue I've got is that some previous idiot who owned the house sealed up the chimney in the back room so I need to remove the existing chimney pot and put in a new one before I can get one. Hopefully I can get that sorted next summer.

Some of this is "trendiness", in that log stoves are "cool" all of a sudden - probably the result of indoctrination by property porn TV.

However, they are sensible as they provide an alternative energy source for people to use, one which can be scavenged if needed. In terms of CO2 targets, wood burning is a good thing, as it is zero carbon (being renewable).

The problem with wood burning is that it produces a lot of particulate matter and hydrocarbon emissions. It used to be such a problem, that it prompted the clean air act. In certain parts of the US where mains gas is not available (and heating is either with wood, oil or electricity, with many houses having facility for all 3), rising prices of oil for heat has led to a resurgence of log burning stoves and a major deterioration in air quality. The result has been new legislation in the US (federal and local) which significantly tightens the emissions standards for wood burners, in effect banning most stoves from a number of locations. e.g. My link

Modern stoves, correctly used and burning well seasoned wood produce only relatively modest pollution, which would be acceptable in a semi-rural area. However, if everyone had one in a suburban area, I think that you would have people complaining.

Edited by ChumpusRex

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I'm waiting for the rag 'n' bone man, and the horse and cart to make a comeback..... not long now! :ph34r:

At what point, in the march back to the Victorian era do we kick these thieving scum out?

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This is a pet hate of mine.....

I'd love to put in a woodstove. They are so much more efficient than open fireplaces ( of which we have 2). However the landlord won't agree, so 70% of my heat goes up the chimney.

BTW I'm happy to pay for the stove, if I can get some security of tenure. LL insists on 6 month leases and wonders why I don't spend money on the place.....

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They havealso laid off a lot of firemen since the early 70's.

The increase in use of open fires and woodburners will certainly cause more house fires.

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it's not just buy a stove and sling it into a fireplace ! because they burn hot there needs to be a chimney lining and fire-resistant plinth as well as the cost of installing. To give you some idea it took a day for two burly chaps to install mine and I had an existing inglenook with a stone floor. It is not a job for amateur property developers.

then the cost of wood is on the up

it is all about trendiness unless you have 6 acres of woodland (the estimated amount of trees to keep your wood burning stove going all winter.

and they do not need the chimney swept as often as open fires :D

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it's not just buy a stove and sling it into a fireplace ! because they burn hot there needs to be a chimney lining and fire-resistant plinth as well as the cost of installing. To give you some idea it took a day for two burly chaps to install mine and I had an existing inglenook with a stone floor. It is not a job for amateur property developers.

then the cost of wood is on the up

it is all about trendiness unless you have 6 acres of woodland (the estimated amount of trees to keep your wood burning stove going all winter.

and they do not need the chimney swept as often as open fires :D

6 acres! Just how big is your stove?!

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Some of this is "trendiness", in that log stoves are "cool" all of a sudden - probably the result of indoctrination by property porn TV.

However, they are sensible as they provide an alternative energy source for people to use, one which can be scavenged if needed. In terms of CO2 targets, wood burning is a good thing, as it is zero carbon (being renewable).

The problem with wood burning is that it produces a lot of particulate matter and hydrocarbon emissions. It used to be such a problem, that it prompted the clean air act. In certain parts of the US where mains gas is not available (and heating is either with wood, oil or electricity, with many houses having facility for all 3), rising prices of oil for heat has led to a resurgence of log burning stoves and a major deterioration in air quality. The result has been new legislation in the US (federal and local) which significantly tightens the emissions standards for wood burners, in effect banning most stoves from a number of locations. e.g. My link

Modern stoves, correctly used and burning well seasoned wood produce only relatively modest pollution, which would be acceptable in a semi-rural area. However, if everyone had one in a suburban area, I think that you would have people complaining.

I'm glad I'm not the only person who thinks these things, while attractive on some fronts, are far from a good idea in many places.

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6 acres! Just how big is your stove?!

I don't have 6 acres but if you want to keep the stove going all the time (i.e. main source of heat and everything else) you need that amount of woodland to be self sufficient in logs - plus of course you get the fun of cutting, sawing, stacking and carrying said wood :D

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I don't have 6 acres but if you want to keep the stove going all the time (i.e. main source of heat and everything else) you need that amount of woodland to be self sufficient in logs - plus of course you get the fun of cutting, sawing, stacking and carrying said wood :D

That depends on the size and efficiency of the house, no?

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However, they are sensible as they provide an alternative energy source for people to use, one which can be scavenged if needed.

At the moment it can, but if a sufficient number of households start to burn it for domestic heat, it will become, like the copper wire nicked by pikeys from the side of railway tracks, a valuable and costly commodity.

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There was an interesting thread on the cost effectiveness of wood burners v. gas/oil etc on another forum this week (check out "Arbtalk" - lots of burly guys with chainsaws mostly in the tree related professions). The consensus view was that oil, gas or coal was much more cost effective than a wood burner UNLESS you got the wood for free(which most of them obviously do).

Re the comment about needing to line the flue - no you don't always have to - it depends on the condition and set up of the existing flue. Lots of these new stove installation companies peddle that line because it's extra £££ for them. We have run a couple of stoves for years without liners without any problems. Regular chimney sweeping though is essential (£9.95 set of drain rods and a compatible brush head is all that's needed - perhaps also treat yourself to a Lidl ash vacuum cleaner if you don't want to knacker the dyson) :)

[edit spelling]

Edited by hellsbells

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At the moment it can, but if a sufficient number of households start to burn it for domestic heat, it will become, like the copper wire nicked by pikeys from the side of railway tracks, a valuable and costly commodity.

Already happening.

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There was an interesting thread on the cost effectiveness of wood burners v. gas/oil etc on another forum this week (check out "Arbtalk" - lots of burly guys with chainsaws mostly in the tree related professions). The consensus view was that oil, gas or coal was much more cost effective than a wood burner UNLESS you got the wood for free(which most of them obviously do).

Re the comment about needing to line the flue - no you don't always have to - it depends on the condition and set up of the existing flue. Lots of these new stove installation companies pedal that line because it's extra £££ for them. We have run a couple of stoves for years without liners without any problems. Regular chimney sweeping though is essential (£9.95 set of drain rods and a compatible brush head is all that's needed - perhaps also treat yourself to a Lidl ash vacuum cleaner if you don't want to knacker the dyson) :)

If only they did dual fuel stoves....

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The more people burning wood the better. Even so, by all accounts it will still take 5000 years until London is underwater, so I won't get my hopes up. All I can do is my bit.

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The consensus view was that oil, gas or coal was much more cost effective than a wood burner UNLESS you got the wood for free(which most of them obviously do).

Check with your local council. Wimbledon Common sell a lot of wood - you can basically fill your car/van for a very low fixed amount. It's not seasoned, so you need somewhere to stash it, but my cousin picks up about 2 years supply for around £40 or something.

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I don't have 6 acres but if you want to keep the stove going all the time (i.e. main source of heat and everything else) you need that amount of woodland to be self sufficient in logs - plus of course you get the fun of cutting, sawing, stacking and carrying said wood :D

My parents have a 20 year old wood burning stove and they used 2 pine trees last winter and they keep it going 24/7. 6 acres is nonsense.

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