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A Home By The Sea

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Inspired by a topic currently active on the main board I thought I'd start a thread devoted to coastal properties in the UK.

No particular purpose – just general interest stuff.

I'll start it off with a link to a home for sale in Dunwich, Suffolk, which last sold for £125,000 in Dec 2000. It's currently on the market for £525,000:

http://www.rightmove.co.uk/property-for-sale/property-40660162.html

I think it will be interesting to see what the property sells for and how the area develops over time.

Some links that may be of interest:

Wikipedia entry for Dunwich

Shoreline Management Plan 7 - Lowestoft to Felixstowe

Executive Summary

Policy Development Zone 3 - Easton Broad to Dunwich Cliffs

Dunwich1.jpg

Dunwich2.jpg

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Wow, that's got to have at most ten years in it like the coastal ones in Holderness.

You'd only pay for that what you'd pay for a short lease.

£525k??

Taylor-Swift-Laughing-Gif-taylor-swift-30258989-500-245.gif

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This would suit me as I calculate my life expectancy at another 30 years. The property could just crash into the sea, when I go. :rolleyes:

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Inspired by a topic currently active on the main board I thought I'd start a thread devoted to coastal properties in the UK.

Environment agency website might be useful

http://maps.environment-agency.gov.uk/wiyby/wiybyController?value=Dunwich%2C+Suffolk&submit.x=12&submit.y=14&submit=Search%09〈=_e&ep=map&topic=floodmap&layerGroups=default&scale=9&textonly=off

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AFAIK shoreline management plans are in place all round the coast.

Basically it was a process by which the EA state 'We'll not do anything to protect houses falling into the sea. Tough'

Anyone thinking of buying anything on the East coast esp. from Brid down to Southend should google Holbeck Hall.

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This would suit me as I calculate my life expectancy at another 30 years. The property could just crash into the sea, when I go. :rolleyes:

You want to scout the east coast of Yorkshire between Filey and Spurn Point - we camped at Easington this summer, and there were a couple of small houses that must only have a couple of decades left! The coast erodes at something like 1.5 - 2m per year which is the fast in Europe. Pretty boring though, even the bright lights of, er, Hull are about a 45 min drive away. Fantastic beaches though, and hardly anybody there (I saw a couple of naturist sunbathers).

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AFAIK shoreline management plans are in place all round the coast.

Basically it was a process by which the EA state 'We'll not do anything to protect houses falling into the sea. Tough'

Anyone thinking of buying anything on the East coast esp. from Brid down to Southend should google Holbeck Hall.

It doesn't seem to be deterring some buyers, who presumably are fully aware of the risks and have decided that the use they will get from the property is ample compensation for any capital loss.

Here's an example in Walcott (Ostend) which is just along the coast from Happisburgh where the problems of coastal erosion have been well advertised.

This property sold in June 2013 for £125,000 and another Horizon Views home is currently on the market (the agents say that they have received an offer of £122,500).

Ostend1.jpg

Looking at the relevant section of the North East Norfolk Shoreline Management Plan, it appears that little attempt is being made to defend this part of the coastline because the erosion is necessary to supply sediment to other parts of the coast, bolstering natural defences.

The plan seems to suggest that this area of coastline will be eroded by 2025.

Ostend2.jpg

A month ago 30 people were temporarily evacuated from their homes in Walcott during a storm.

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Wow, that's got to have at most ten years in it like the coastal ones in Holderness.

You'd only pay for that what you'd pay for a short lease.

£525k??

Taylor-Swift-Laughing-Gif-taylor-swift-30258989-500-245.gif

Maybe they're banking on compensation, would they / could they have "falling into the sea" cover if it comes to that?

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Wow, that's got to have at most ten years in it like the coastal ones in Holderness.

You'd only pay for that what you'd pay for a short lease.

£525k??

Taylor-Swift-Laughing-Gif-taylor-swift-30258989-500-245.gif

I think it will still be there in ten years time. Not sure for how long after though.

it does have two points of attack to it though which is not good, one from cliffs erroding (still about 30-40 metres away) and also from the beach car park up the slight hill to it. A couple of big storms hitting it might accelerate the errosion. not good anyway.

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I think it will still be there in ten years time. Not sure for how long after though.

it does have two points of attack to it though which is not good, one from cliffs erroding (still about 30-40 metres away) and also from the beach car park up the slight hill to it. A couple of big storms hitting it might accelerate the errosion. not good anyway.

Yes, I don't think there's any suggestion that it won't be there in ten years' time. In the executive summary of the Shoreline Management Plan (SMP) it says that at Dunwich "it is likely that some five properties would be lost in the medium term (between 2025 and 2055)".

The five properties aren't identified, but in the Policy Development Zone doc it says that under a 'No Active Intervention' scenario the Ship Inn is likely to be lost by 2055 and it is also under threat in the first epoch (which is between now and 2025).

It isn't entirely clear what active management (if any) is proposed to mitigate this risk and the SMP states that the long-term goal is to allow this section of coast to erode naturally.

As you say, the big risk is from major storms, which can result in flooding and multi-metre loss of shoreline in a very short period of time.

Incidentally, I believe the overhead image in the OP was taken in January 2007.

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From the Environment Agency this morning:

Communities urged to prepare for worst east coast tidal surge in 30 years

Communities along the length of the east coast of England should be braced for the most serious coastal tidal surge for over 30 years.

The Environment Agency and Met Office are warning that gale-force winds, large waves and a tidal surge caused by low pressure will combine with high tides tomorrow (Thursday), throughout Friday and to Saturday morning, bringing a risk of significant coastal flooding.

In some places, sea levels could be as high as those during the devastating floods of 1953. However, flood defences built since then – including the Thames, Dartford and Hull Barriers – mean that many parts of the country are much better protected than in 1953.

One severe flood warning in place

The Environment Agency recently issued a severe flood warning – its highest category – to homes and businesses near The Quay in Sandwich, Kent, for high tides at 00:43 and 13:06 on Friday. At present, there are also 16 flood warnings and 52 flood alerts in place.

Areas most at risk

These include the North Sea coast from Northumberland down to the Thames Estuary and Kent.

The tidal reaches of the River Trent, Nottinghamshire, could also be affected.

And on the west coast, from Cumbria down to Cheshire, severe gales and large waves combined with high water levels are also expected tomorrow (Thursday).

The Environment Agency will be closing the Thames Barrier on Thursday night to defend London, in addition to operating other defences including those at Colne in Essex and Hull.

Natural Resources Wales, the organisation which leads on flooding in Wales, is urging people along the north Wales coast between eastern Anglesey and Liverpool to be prepared for flooding on Thursday.

Dr Paul Leinster, Environment Agency Chief Executive, said: 'Gale force winds and large waves along the east coast of England are forecast during Thursday and Friday, coinciding with high tides and a significant coastal surge'.

'Flooding of some coastal communities is expected and some defences could be overtopped by the combined effect of high tides, high winds and a tidal surge.'

'Coastal paths and promenades will be highly dangerous as there is an increased risk of people being swept out to sea.'

http://www.environment-agency.gov.uk/news/151065.aspx

FloodAlerts051213.jpg

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Do you think the sellers might accept a low-ball offer this morning?

High water at Dunwich is expected to be at 10.45pm tonight.

The astronomical tide level is expected to be 1.200m AODN combined with a 1.935m surge, so 3.135m total.

In the Hunstanton area high water level is expected to be 4.856m AODN at 8.00pm.

(AODN = Above Ordnance Datum Newlyn, with reference to the average sea level at Newlyn in Cornwall.)

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Update by Environment Agency

11:00 Update: Environment Agency issues multiple severe flood warnings for worst tidal surge in 60 years

05-Dec-2013

Communities urged to take action to prepare

The Environment Agency has issued 26 severe flood warnings – its highest category – ahead of the most serious coastal tidal surge for over 60 years in England.

Communities along the North Sea coast from Northumberland down to the Thames Estuary and Kent, in addition to those on the Irish Sea coast from Cumbria down to Cheshire, could see significant coastal flooding later today and into Friday. The coastline from Wells-next-the-Sea in Norfolk to Clacton, Essex, is particularly at risk, including Great Yarmouth and Lowestoft.

Evacuations are taking place

Evacuations are taking place in some areas, including Great Yarmouth, by the emergency services and people are urged to follow any instructions by the police.

Severe flood warnings are currently in place across Kent, Norfolk and Suffolk. People along the eastern coast, and some parts of the north west coast, are being urged to take urgent action to prepare for flooding today (Thursday) and into the early hours of Friday. The Environment Agency is likely to issue further severe flood warnings in the coming hours.

Some defences could be overtopped by the combined effect of high tides, high winds and a large tidal surge.

At present (as of 1100), there are an additional 137 flood warnings and 61 flood alerts in place across England.

http://www.environment-agency.gov.uk/news/151065.aspx

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Oh dear! Miranda and Hugo may have to put their plans for an artisan olive oil shop in Southwold on hold...

Edited by juvenal

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A couple more coastal properties on the market at present, both in Norfolk.

http://www.rightmove.co.uk/property-for-sale/property-27398994.html

BurnhamNorton051213.jpg

BurnhamNorton051213b.jpg

----------------

http://www.rightmove.co.uk/property-for-sale/property-26769069.html

[Edit: this property previously sold for £1,810,000 in Sep 2006]

BrancasterStaithe051213.jpg

BrancasterStaithe051213b.jpg

Edit: added previous sold price for the second property

Edited by FreeTrader

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