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Ologhai Jones

Having Your D N A Sequenced

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I've just seen the following on the BBC website: Massive DNA volunteer hunt begins (which links to the UK Personal Genome Project's site), and I was considering (briefly) volunteering.

However, they're specifically (and openly) not guaranteeing anonymity, and I was wondering if anyone had looked into having their DNA sequenced on their own dime?

I don't mind the 'for the good of society' thing, but I think my primary motivation for wanting my own DNA sequencing is to find out what's wrong with me so I can make lifestyle adjustments accordingly (if applicable).

Anyone considered it? Either volunteering for the above project, or paying for it yourself?

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Kind of the opposite of house prices - note the log scale. This beats Moore's law both on cost and time. Wait a couple of years when not only has the cost become far more affordable but people will have a much better idea of what they can possibly read into the data!

Also note that illumina's usd99 genotyping is not the same as having your whole genome sequenced.

sequencecosts2001to2020.png

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I've just seen the following on the BBC website: Massive DNA volunteer hunt begins (which links to the UK Personal Genome Project's site), and I was considering (briefly) volunteering.

However, they're specifically (and openly) not guaranteeing anonymity, and I was wondering if anyone had looked into having their DNA sequenced on their own dime?

I don't mind the 'for the good of society' thing, but I think my primary motivation for wanting my own DNA sequencing is to find out what's wrong with me so I can make lifestyle adjustments accordingly (if applicable).

Anyone considered it? Either volunteering for the above project, or paying for it yourself?

Personally, I wouldn't have any qualms. It would be interesting.

I amplified and sequenced about 800bp of my own a few years ago out of idle of curiosity.

It confirmed I'm human and of this earth - contrary to popular belief

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I've just seen the following on the BBC website: Massive DNA volunteer hunt begins (which links to the UK Personal Genome Project's site), and I was considering (briefly) volunteering.

However, they're specifically (and openly) not guaranteeing anonymity, and I was wondering if anyone had looked into having their DNA sequenced on their own dime?

I don't mind the 'for the good of society' thing, but I think my primary motivation for wanting my own DNA sequencing is to find out what's wrong with me so I can make lifestyle adjustments accordingly (if applicable).

Anyone considered it? Either volunteering for the above project, or paying for it yourself?

This sort of stuff has some implications.

For example, if you sequenced yourself and found a major genetic flaw, would you want to know. Ignorance can be bliss and knowledge once you have it is declarable. For example on applying for finance.

Of course it could be that you could find some information out that is to your advantage.

Second thing is that sometimes the rules regarding this sort of stuff can be wound back. For example, wasn't there something regarding sperm donor anonimity that was changed recently ?

What happens if the government decides it is in the public interest to cross check the medical database amongst the criminal one ? And what happens if the million to one chance (or whatever) happens that your DNA matches, even though you did not commit the crime ?

Sadly because of all the above issues I would not be wanting to volunteer my DNA for projects such as the above.

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Kind of the opposite of house prices - note the log scale. This beats Moore's law both on cost and time. Wait a couple of years when not only has the cost become far more affordable but people will have a much better idea of what they can possibly read into the data!

Also note that illumina's usd99 genotyping is not the same as having your whole genome sequenced.

sequencecosts2001to2020.png

That's never going to happen is it.

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Isn't it the lack of Anonymity that's the perceived problem?

They sequence me, put me up online and within six months there's a black market in my genetic identity? In 10 years time some cunning stunt figures out how to commit the perfect crime and frame my Mum by replicating her gentic signature?

Excuse any howling errors in language above but I thought that was the gist.

P

I would have no problem with my DNA sequence being in the public domain, although I would not want my name linked to it publicly.

However, I can understand why at some point in the database it would be useful to be able to associate an identity to a sequence so that future discoveries could be followed up - perhaps by investigating familial sequences if necessary, or ancestry.

I would expect to be given a copy of my sequence for personal research.

An individual could choose whether to be given any information pertinent to their health. However, 'if we are all in it together', there is no a priori reason why DNA information should be available to insurers of life.

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Yes, I believe they are planning to give the individuals copies and fully debrief them as to any implications so I was tempted myself.

But, they're asking you to sign all sorts of disclaimers because they fully expect there to be complications from putting it in the public domain. They won't put personal names with data but they seem to think its very easy for the resourceful hacker or criminal to get that info themselves if not now then in the very near future.

That was how I read the article.

P

Must confess I didn't read the article in detail :o

I don't know how to 'hack', but I would hope that there could be a good chain of custody.

I can understand why you might be asked to give away all your 'rights' upfront - although the consequence is that this can make people wary of participation.

It is a difficult area ethically and ethnically too. Many racial differences in DNA affect the efficacy of drugs and there are already huge cultural reservations within many races towards accessing their DNA to develop better remedies for themselves.

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You know what it is like. You get your DNA sequenced under promise of anonymity and then 18 years later some half human half tomato hybrid turns up calling you "Daddy"! :unsure:

So THAT's how Daddies tomato sauce is made

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Kind of the opposite of house prices - note the log scale. This beats Moore's law both on cost and time. Wait a couple of years when not only has the cost become far more affordable but people will have a much better idea of what they can possibly read into the data!

A geneticist at work was telling everyone about the new "ion torrent" sequencer that's about to hit the market (if it hasn't already). Apparently, a single technician and a single machine can sequence an entire human genome in one day, at a total cost of under $1000.

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A geneticist at work was telling everyone about the new "ion torrent" sequencer that's about to hit the market (if it hasn't already). Apparently, a single technician and a single machine can sequence an entire human genome in one day, at a total cost of under $1000.

I understand you are in the Medical Business Dr Chump! Who on Earth would replicate me?

Although however I do understand, you are in the Frankenstein business too! ;)

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A geneticist at work was telling everyone about the new "ion torrent" sequencer that's about to hit the market (if it hasn't already). Apparently, a single technician and a single machine can sequence an entire human genome in one day, at a total cost of under $1000.

I think they are over-egging the technology a bit at this stage. Short 'real-time' reads is about where it's at, currently. Could certainly be useful for diagnostics in a hospital lab for fast screening mutiple samples and quickly detecting point mutations, however.

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