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SirGaz

Monitor From Amazon.co.uk

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So I ordered a nice new monitor from Amazon and it gets delivered with a German plug on the power cord. :angry:

I then phone customer support and all they can tell me is to either order an adaptor plug and they'll let me have it for free (the adaptor) or I take the time and effort to send it back, then reorder another one and hope I get a UK power cord.

I had to hang up otherwise I would have got shouty :P

Not a happy bunny at the moment.

I am now waiting for the chap on the text support to get back to me but all he keeps writing is that according to the website it should come with a UK power lead. Well no sugar sherlock....

I might just wait until the morning in the hope of actually getting through to someone in the UK.

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It is not as described or fit for purpose so you are entitled to your money back. Did you speak with a Yank who knows little about life outside of America?

Out of interest, how much is the monitor on the German Amazon site?

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Poke something* into the earth hole of a UK mains socket and it opens up the live and neutral holes, allowing you to fit a Euro plug in.

* You're not supposed to do this.

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Poke something* into the earth hole of a UK mains socket and it opens up the live and neutral holes, allowing you to fit a Euro plug in.

* You're not supposed to do this.

A game of roulette for someone who doesn't know how to wire a plug. :D

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Technically it's illegal for Amazon to supply something with a non conforming plug. Not like they are going to do much about it though.

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Poke something* into the earth hole of a UK mains socket and it opens up the live and neutral holes, allowing you to fit a Euro plug in.

* You're not supposed to do this.

:lol: my son dropped his micro scalextric transformer snapping off the plastic earth pin. Hence I now have to do exactly as you describe.

Although in my defence, I do that with an unplugged extension, not directly into the wall socket.

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It was Amazon Sarl not a reseller.

I was a bit upset at the idea of spending 400 quid on a monitor only to have the power cord dangling out of an adaptor.

I was in conversation with residents of the subcontinent judging by the language skills and complete inability to understand the problem let alone do anything to rectify it.

I have a new one in the post and then I have to phone up a courier to pick up the German one.

I have to say that if you have to try and contact Amazon help in the evening you've a far better chance of being helped using the online chat function rather than the call centre.

If it was only fifty quid or so I would have snipped the german plug off and wired an english one on. B)

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Ok you have way too little going on if this is a big issue.

Buy one of these off ebay

http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/EURO-PLUG-TO-UK-THREE-3-PIN-PLUG-ADAPTOR-5AMP-FUSE-INCLUDED-ACCEPTS-13AMP-/170844364058?pt=UK_TravelTickets_Accessories_RL&hash=item27c71e1d1a

$(KGrHqV,!pME9o3nVHW3BPtN),jhKg~~60_12.JPG

Use a shaver adapter while you're waiting for it to be delivered if you have one or I'm guessing if it's a monitor it will actually just be an adapter to a 3 pin kettle plug socket itself so use a lead off another monitor or the one from a kettle alternatively.

This is incredibly common and people in Continental Europe manage to use these electrical plugs without killing themselves all the time and I'm sure, in due course we'll be forced to have them here despite being less safe than the existing connectors.

Unfortunately manufacturers of electrical products commonly don't put the right lead in the box even though they will be labelled UK on the exterior. Now if the retailer decided to open the sealed boxes to check the lead is correct would this A] Be well received by customers for ensuring they have the right lead, or B] Unleash the most unimaginably large torrent of ranting, abusive emails and phone calls about how you're ripping them off selling them used products?

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It was Amazon Sarl not a reseller.

I was a bit upset at the idea of spending 400 quid on a monitor only to have the power cord dangling out of an adaptor.

I was in conversation with residents of the subcontinent judging by the language skills and complete inability to understand the problem let alone do anything to rectify it.

I have a new one in the post and then I have to phone up a courier to pick up the German one.

I have to say that if you have to try and contact Amazon help in the evening you've a far better chance of being helped using the online chat function rather than the call centre.

If it was only fifty quid or so I would have snipped the german plug off and wired an english one on. B)

If you bought of an ostensibly UK based seller then it is in breach of trading standards not supplying with a UK plug as legislation was brought in to ensure this is the case when it was concluded your average UK consumer is too much of a moron to be trusted to wire a plug on anything safely.

You could contact Trading Standards who, if it was your local high st electrical independent, would be more than happy to penalise them to the extent they go out of business. As it's Amazon it would be far too much work and far too expensive to take them on so it would go nowhere.

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Have you considered writing to the Daily Mail and getting them to put a euro sausage rant in their paper about how Britain is being destroyed by dodgy European plugs?

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I'm sorry but I don't see a big problem here. Why don't you cut the 2-pin plug off and wire up a 3-pin one. It'll take all of 5 minutes and you'll only need a pair of wire strippers and a small screwdriver along with a plug.. Surely you have some basic tools?

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Is the mains wire hard-wired into the back of the monitor, or does it attach with an IEC C13 connector at the monitor end?

If it uses an IEC lead (sometimes colloquially referred to as a kettle lead), you can get one from Ebay for £3-5 with a UK plug on the other end, depending on how long you want it. If you don't want to fanny-ãrse around with Ebay, Maplin will sell you one for around a tenner, I'd guess.

However, if its mains lead is hardwired into the back of the monitor, your two options are to use an adaptor (as suggested by the vendor), or simply chop the Euro plug off and fit a British one yourself. Now that virtually every consumer appliance is sold with a moulded-on plug (when I were a lad, they typically didn't come with a plug on them at all!), mains plugs that you fit yourself with a screwdriver and a pair of teeth (to strip the wires to enable you to insert them into a a terminal) are a bit more difficult to get hold of. But the last I knew, you could still buy them at B & Q for a couple of quid.

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Is the mains wire hard-wired into the back of the monitor, or does it attach with an IEC C13 connector at the monitor end?

If it uses an IEC lead (sometimes colloquially referred to as a kettle lead), you can get one from Ebay for £3-5 with a UK plug on the other end, depending on how long you want it. If you don't want to fanny-ãrse around with Ebay, Maplin will sell you one for around a tenner, I'd guess.

It's probably an IEC lead! Like you say, easily available but still annoying! Kettle leads have a cut out bit, so you can't get the ordinary IEC plug in, as kettle leads have "hot condition" plugs.

£10.99 @ Maplin ,BTW.

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I'm also interested in whether a 400 quid monitor has a hard wired cable - not sure I'd like that even if it came with a UK plug moulded on! Like most computer geeks (or in my case, former computer geeks) I have kettle leads coming out of my ears here.

I had this problem when I ordered a guitar amp from Thomann - of course they're a German company, but I clicked on the little union flag to get through to their English site, and paid in GBP. The amp arrived hard wired, with a moulded continental three pin plug on it (IIRC - and edit to say that by that I mean a two pin plug with a hole for the earth pin). I was pretty cheesed off TBH - I hummed and hawed for a bit, as I didn't have an adaptor to plug it in just to test it. I really wanted to have a go with my new guitar, but what if the amp was faulty- they could blame it on my plug wiring? In the end I bit the bullet, cut their plug off, wired it up to a UK one, and it was fine.

Since stuff started coming with moulded on plugs I have been wondering if one day they'll ban the sale of traditional wire-it-yourself plugs in the interests of saving us all from ourselves- so now if I'm disposing of an old bit of electrical kit that has one I always remove it and stash it! Can't be too careful B) .

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Stopping selling 3-pin plugs would probably be a backwards safety move as it would likely end up with all sorts of wires twisted together gaffer-taped bodgery. Sales of 3-pin self-fit plugs, much like fuses too, have been in huge decline for a while.

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I'm also interested in whether a 400 quid monitor has a hard wired cable - not sure I'd like that even if it came with a UK plug moulded on! Like most computer geeks (or in my case, former computer geeks) I have kettle leads coming out of my ears here.

I had this problem when I ordered a guitar amp from Thomann - of course they're a German company, but I clicked on the little union flag to get through to their English site, and paid in GBP. The amp arrived hard wired, with a moulded continental three pin plug on it (IIRC - and edit to say that by that I mean a two pin plug with a hole for the earth pin). I was pretty cheesed off TBH - I hummed and hawed for a bit, as I didn't have an adaptor to plug it in just to test it. I really wanted to have a go with my new guitar, but what if the amp was faulty- they could blame it on my plug wiring? In the end I bit the bullet, cut their plug off, wired it up to a UK one, and it was fine.

Since stuff started coming with moulded on plugs I have been wondering if one day they'll ban the sale of traditional wire-it-yourself plugs in the interests of saving us all from ourselves- so now if I'm disposing of an old bit of electrical kit that has one I always remove it and stash it! Can't be too careful B) .

Guitar amps never seem to have detachable leads, since roadies might lose them. Virtually all computer monitors do, and most audio equipment.

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:lol: my son dropped his micro scalextric transformer snapping off the plastic earth pin. Hence I now have to do exactly as you describe.

Although in my defence, I do that with an unplugged extension, not directly into the wall socket.

I think I might be inclined to permanently epoxy glue the broken transformer into an extension like this. It seems like a bit of a recipe for your son poking around with the plug socket if you weren't around.

1_Gang_Extensions.jpg

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Poke something* into the earth hole of a UK mains socket and it opens up the live and neutral holes, allowing you to fit a Euro plug in.

* You're not supposed to do this.

Shouldn't this have a disclaimer that you also inadvertently turned a tumble dryer into a spot-welder during a repair operation gone wrong, as this sounds like you're on course to add an arc welder to your collection of metal bonding apparatus? :P

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Guitar amps never seem to have detachable leads, since roadies might lose them. Virtually all computer monitors do, and most audio equipment.

When I worked in the cinema business, virtually the first thing we did with anything that arrived hardwired was to chop the plug off and attach an inline IEC C14 (male): that way, we knew that a C13 lead would connect anything in the building to a power supply.

Stopping selling 3-pin plugs would probably be a backwards safety move as it would likely end up with all sorts of wires twisted together gaffer-taped bodgery. Sales of 3-pin self-fit plugs, much like fuses too, have been in huge decline for a while.

I can understand the sale of wire-it-yourself plugs being in decline, but why fuses? If anything, I'd expect sales of fuses to go up with the move to moulded-on plugs. The wire-it-yourself ones typically came with a 13-amp fuse inside, and I'd bet that 99.9% of people who bought them didn't bother to replace it with one of the correct rating for the appliance. The result would be that a table lamp, for example, would have to have turned itself into a heater element before a 13-amp fuse would blow. But if it had been correctly fitted with a 1-amp (ideal, but difficult to get hold of) or 3-amp (more likely), which a pre-supplied plug probably would be, a power spike could do it, or a bulb blowing could take the fuse with it; hence higher sales of replacement fuses.

Anyway, spare a thought for me in the US, where we have to put up with NEMA plugs. They're effin' lethal, in my opinion: far flimiser than British plugs in every possible way, and because the mains supply is only 120v, they have to carry double the current (amps) of their British counterparts. Oh, and they don't have fuses, at all, meaning that if the appliance doesn't have an internal fuse, all that stands between you and quite a decent fire is the GFCI (ground fault circuit interrupter - what the Americans call a RCD), if the outlet has one and the appliance is earthed, and the breaker on the mains circuit if not. After our kettle has boiled, the plug is literally too hot to pull from the outlet without using a tea towel. When my computer and audio stuff arrives from the slow but cheap shipping process, I intend to take two or three British 4-way extension leads and put wire-it-yourself, heavy duty NEMA plugs on the outlet end, so that I can continue to use British plugs (with fuses) with the individual devices.

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I would guess the universal installation of circuit breakers rather than traditional fuse wire for domestic electric supply boards and better made electrical appliances is behind the sales decline of plug fuses but it's a guess, I only really know for sure that they don't sell anything like as much.

Edit to add: the plugs don't universally come with 13A, these days, either 3 or 5A but can't remember.

Though about it some more probably if a toaster stops working people buy another from Tesco for £10 and don't even bother messing about with fuses.

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When I worked in the cinema business, virtually the first thing we did with anything that arrived hardwired was to chop the plug off and attach an inline IEC C14 (male): that way, we knew that a C13 lead would connect anything in the building to a power supply.

I can understand the sale of wire-it-yourself plugs being in decline, but why fuses? If anything, I'd expect sales of fuses to go up with the move to moulded-on plugs. The wire-it-yourself ones typically came with a 13-amp fuse inside, and I'd bet that 99.9% of people who bought them didn't bother to replace it with one of the correct rating for the appliance. The result would be that a table lamp, for example, would have to have turned itself into a heater element before a 13-amp fuse would blow. But if it had been correctly fitted with a 1-amp (ideal, but difficult to get hold of) or 3-amp (more likely), which a pre-supplied plug probably would be, a power spike could do it, or a bulb blowing could take the fuse with it; hence higher sales of replacement fuses.

Anyway, spare a thought for me in the US, where we have to put up with NEMA plugs. They're effin' lethal, in my opinion: far flimiser than British plugs in every possible way, and because the mains supply is only 120v, they have to carry double the current (amps) of their British counterparts. Oh, and they don't have fuses, at all, meaning that if the appliance doesn't have an internal fuse, all that stands between you and quite a decent fire is the GFCI (ground fault circuit interrupter - what the Americans call a RCD), if the outlet has one and the appliance is earthed, and the breaker on the mains circuit if not. After our kettle has boiled, the plug is literally too hot to pull from the outlet without using a tea towel. When my computer and audio stuff arrives from the slow but cheap shipping process, I intend to take two or three British 4-way extension leads and put wire-it-yourself, heavy duty NEMA plugs on the outlet end, so that I can continue to use British plugs (with fuses) with the individual devices.

I haven't changed a fuse for years, I still take them out of appliances that I am throwing away (having first swapped the fuse to check that isn't the problem) so I am gradually accumulating ever more 3, 5 and 13 amp fuses and can't see myself buying one again.

I certainly used to change fuses when they went.

Guessing at reasons:

More regulated power supply

Circuit breakers on the mains circuits preventing surges

Better quality manufacturing

I really don't know but the fuses used to go and now they don't.

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Why not just send it back? you can do this online, Amazon will send you a sticker to stick on the box and arrange for someone to pick it up from your house! Really very simple!

I had a baby carrier changed and the replacement arrived before i sent off the first item.

After helping my sister against Argos, I really think Amazon has a great returns policy.

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