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The Masked Tulip

1,000 Jobs To Go In Uk Ship Yards

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Nick Robinson just said on BBC that 1,000 shipyard jobs to go but none will go in Scotland because of the independence vote coming up.

Currently unknown where in England the jobs will go.

Engineering - UK doesn't need it :blink:

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800 jobs to go in Scotland also - for every job that goes another 68 goes in the local community apparently.

Jobs will go because Type 26 frigate contract will not be awarded until 2016 which, of course, depends on whether Scotland is still part of the UK or not.

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They are all walking out now in Scotland and going home according to the Beeb.

They can all get jobs at BTL speculators and spivs in Edinburgh. They'll be fine.

The jobless recovery is going very well.

I myself have become a bank and I am lending to failed businesses and peolpe with no money.

I feel good about myself for the first time in years,

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800 jobs to go in Scotland also - for every job that goes another 68 goes in the local community apparently.

Jobs will go because Type 26 frigate contract will not be awarded until 2016 which, of course, depends on whether Scotland is still part of the UK or not.

Supposedly Portsmouth doesn't have the capacity to assemble the Type 26 frigates anyway, which is why BAe wants to build them on the Clyde after the success of the Type 45 destroyers, which were all assembled at Scotstoun.

Although part of me is suspicious that they may well have closed the Govan yard today if it weren't for next years referendum, as any promises of "Vote NO and keep your jobs" would have sounded pretty pathetic if they had allowed Govan to shut.

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BAE said it would begin consultation to cut 1,775 jobs "to result from these restructuring proposals".

This would see 940 posts go in Portsmouth in 2014 and 835 across Filton, Glasgow and Rosyth, through to 2016.

The statement added: "The cost of the restructuring will be borne by the Ministry of Defence.

The Filton (Bristol), Glasgow and Rosyth losses could be mainly voluntary redundancy, while the pompy losses will be more drastic. Nice to see the cost will be borne by the MoD british taxpayer.

Edit: beeb link

Edited by Quicken

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They can all get jobs at BTL speculators and spivs in Edinburgh. They'll be fine.

I myself have become a bank and I am lending to failed businesses and peolpe with no money.

I might do the same. I used to run an ISP from a container in East London. I now run a hedge fund from a Council flat. Fun innit?

Who needs a real job making real stuff? :blink::(

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800 jobs to go in Scotland also - for every job that goes another 68 goes in the local community apparently.

Jobs will go because Type 26 frigate contract will not be awarded until 2016 which, of course, depends on whether Scotland is still part of the UK or not.

If Scotland leave, then at that moment, the entity known as the UK will cease to exist.

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Only in the minds of the Welsh Nats Caius :)

What Brit nats living in Wales like yourself fail to understand is that the Welsh economy is a basket case because Wales it isn't taken seriously...unlike Scotland.

Britain was formed when Scotland and England were united.

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I am talking about the political entity which exists today.

Britain comes from Latin meaning 'Land of Britons' who spoke a Brythonic Celtic language closely related to Welsh, Cornish and Breton. The term Britian in it's modern usage was adopted in order to make it seem more inclusive. The 'Great' part is to distinguish it from Brittany or 'Lesser Britain'. When the Angles came (around 500 AD) , the term Britain or it's Latin equivilent was no longer used until the union of Scotland and England in 1707.

NB

The oldest surviving documents written in Welsh is 'Y Gododdin which was written in what is today southern Scotland and tells of a battle against the Angles at Catterick in what is today the north of England. It was written around the 7th century.

Edited by Caius

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Well the focus is on private sector job creation. These seem to be in services and drill down further strong growth is in estate agents. This is called rebalancing :)

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http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-glasgow-west-24831779

Thankfully it's not as bad as we thought.

"BAE cuts 1,775 jobs at its English and Scottish yards"

They have freed up even more workers so they can focus on their BTLs and investment portfolios.I expect even more coffee shops and renovated gastro pubs springing up in those areas best affected.The savvy ones of course will be investing all the redundancy money in London property, it's a sure fired winner.

Onwards and downwards.

( Note: There is nothing left but to take the mickey out of the absurdity of the situation ).

Edited by TheCountOfNowhere

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