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motch

Legal And Serviceable Spare..aa

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Ok. Partner broken down with a puncture, spare tyre has already had a slow puncture so is sitting in the boot flat (my fault from a few months ago, I know). AA will not come out but will get another breakdown company to sort it out.

Is a punctured wheel classed as "not a legal and serviceable spare" ? it has legal tread on it.

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If the tread is legal, I'd guess that they'll inflate it and put it on, but that the puncture had better be slow enough that s/he can get home or to Kwik Fit before it deflates to the point at which the car cannot be driven.

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<br />If the tread is legal, I'd guess that they'll inflate it and put it on, but that the puncture had better be slow enough that s/he can get home or to Kwik Fit before it deflates to the point at which the car cannot be driven.<br />
<br /><br /><br />

All sorted ok in the end. as above cheers. kept up for about an hour.

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<br /><br /><br />

All sorted ok in the end. as above cheers. kept up for about an hour.

It's always good to have a spare that holds air, and a pump, in case you haven't looked at it for a while, and it didn't! :huh:

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<br /><br /><br />

All sorted ok in the end. as above cheers. kept up for about an hour.

You should work in the adult film business. :unsure:

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I don't think there is any legal requirement to carry a spare wheel, and it doesn't have to be good enough to drive on? :blink:

Still it's good to have one that holds air.

I'll add to the list of stuff it's good to carry! Winter is coming.

Water, antifreeze, screenwash, defrosting stuff, brake fluid, oil, WD40, adjustable wrench, screwdrivers, spare bulbs, warning triangle, cellphone, warm coat, snack. :blink:

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And as well as a set of spare bulbs, a set of whatever tools are needed to install them. This is likely to vary from car to car. On the Fiesta I had (last car before leaving the UK earlier this year), it was an 8mm spanner to remove the three bolts holding the headlamp assembly in place, and then a 3mm Allen key to undo the headlamp assembly itself to gain access to the bulb. On the Honda Civic I'm driving here in California, the headlamp bulbs can be retrieved without any special tools, but a large-ish Philips screwdriver is needed to open the assembly containing the tail, brake and reversing bulbs.

Paranoid geek that I am, I've always carried a kit containing the tools needed to change any bulb on the road, with only one exception: the 1997 Mondeo I once had. The headlight bulbs could only be changed by removing the front bumper, which in turn required the car to be jacked up to gain access to bolts. A more stupid piece of design would be hard to imagine: what should be a five-minute job took an hour. For that car, I replaced the bulbs in that unit pre-emptively every year (more often than was probably needed: they say that headlight bulbs are good for two years in average use), on the basis that prevention was preferable to cure.

As for the spare tyre/wheel, I'm guessing that in a lot of cases it's neglected totally (don't think it's an MOT requirement that the spare exist and be roadworthy, but could be wrong), i.e. left underneath the boot and not checked regularly. On my current Civic, I discovered the spare wheel to have a virgin tyre on it, but the rimseal was totally perished and needed re-doing. Most people buying a secondhand car wouldn't bother even to check it, I'd guess.

Incidentally, there is no such thing as the MOT in California. The only legally required check is the 'smog test', which is basically the emissions test component of the MOT, and even this only has to be done every two years, regardless of the age of the car. There are state laws which specify other maintenance requirements for a vehicle to be considered roadworthy, but obeying them is essentially an honour system, just as obeying any other law in the absence of a foolproof enforcement system is. Unless the police pull you over, discover a fault and give you a 'fix it ticket' (a notice to get a specific fault, e.g. bald tyres, rectified, and then present yourself at a police station to prove that you've done so within a specified time), you can quite legally drive a car around which hasn't had any maintenance done in decades.

I'd be interested to compare the accident rate, specifically of accidents caused by poor maintenance, between the US and the UK. It would shed interesting light on whether the MOT represents over-regulation.

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I don't think there is any legal requirement to carry a spare wheel, and it doesn't have to be good enough to drive on? :blink:

Still it's good to have one that holds air.

I'll add to the list of stuff it's good to carry! Winter is coming.

Water, antifreeze, screenwash, defrosting stuff, brake fluid, oil, WD40, adjustable wrench, screwdrivers, spare bulbs, warning triangle, cellphone, warm coat, snack. :blink:

Torch. Blanket.

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And as well as a set of spare bulbs, a set of whatever tools are needed to install them. This is likely to vary from car to car. On the Fiesta I had (last car before leaving the UK earlier this year), it was an 8mm spanner to remove the three bolts holding the headlamp assembly in place, and then a 3mm Allen key to undo the headlamp assembly itself to gain access to the bulb. On the Honda Civic I'm driving here in California, the headlamp bulbs can be retrieved without any special tools, but a large-ish Philips screwdriver is needed to open the assembly containing the tail, brake and reversing bulbs.

Paranoid geek that I am, I've always carried a kit containing the tools needed to change any bulb on the road, with only one exception: the 1997 Mondeo I once had. The headlight bulbs could only be changed by removing the front bumper, which in turn required the car to be jacked up to gain access to bolts. A more stupid piece of design would be hard to imagine: what should be a five-minute job took an hour. For that car, I replaced the bulbs in that unit pre-emptively every year (more often than was probably needed: they say that headlight bulbs are good for two years in average use), on the basis that prevention was preferable to cure.

As for the spare tyre/wheel, I'm guessing that in a lot of cases it's neglected totally (don't think it's an MOT requirement that the spare exist and be roadworthy, but could be wrong), i.e. left underneath the boot and not checked regularly. On my current Civic, I discovered the spare wheel to have a virgin tyre on it, but the rimseal was totally perished and needed re-doing. Most people buying a secondhand car wouldn't bother even to check it, I'd guess.

Incidentally, there is no such thing as the MOT in California. The only legally required check is the 'smog test', which is basically the emissions test component of the MOT, and even this only has to be done every two years, regardless of the age of the car. There are state laws which specify other maintenance requirements for a vehicle to be considered roadworthy, but obeying them is essentially an honour system, just as obeying any other law in the absence of a foolproof enforcement system is. Unless the police pull you over, discover a fault and give you a 'fix it ticket' (a notice to get a specific fault, e.g. bald tyres, rectified, and then present yourself at a police station to prove that you've done so within a specified time), you can quite legally drive a car around which hasn't had any maintenance done in decades.

I'd be interested to compare the accident rate, specifically of accidents caused by poor maintenance, between the US and the UK. It would shed interesting light on whether the MOT represents over-regulation.

Friend drove in Cali with a 2ft crack in his windscreen for years before eventually being ticketed. He was most amused to hear about the 10mm rule in the MOT.

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Torch. Blanket.

I missed out torch. Good one! Perhaps one that works from the cigar socket, not a £1.99 keyfob LED one. No, you don't need a spare wheel at all, as many modern vehicles are now supplied without them. :huh: A pretty daft saving if you ask me! :o

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I missed out torch. Good one! Perhaps one that works from the cigar socket, not a £1.99 keyfob LED one. No, you don't need a spare wheel at all, as many modern vehicles are now supplied without them. :huh: A pretty daft saving if you ask me! :o

I think the AA wouldn't of come out themselves if there was no spare in a car that should have a spare, or it's a bit of a grey area at least. Luckily the tyre was a new one basically but had a slow puncture in it that's all, so they sorted it all out ok.

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I think the AA wouldn't of come out themselves if there was no spare in a car that should have a spare, or it's a bit of a grey area at least. Luckily the tyre was a new one basically but had a slow puncture in it that's all, so they sorted it all out ok.

I find the AA very good! I drive completely oid "*****" of cars! When they ****** up, I phone up! :huh:

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