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Uk Child Poverty Survey Exposes 'grinding Reality' Of Cold, Damp Homes

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http://www.theguardian.com/society/2013/oct/29/uk-child-poverty-cold-damp-homes-finances

More than half of all poor children in the UK are living in homes that are too cold, and around a quarter said their home suffered from damp or mould, a survey published by the Children's Society indicates.

Of those children surveyed who said their family was "not well off at all", 76% said they "often worried" about how much money the family had. More than 53% said their home was too cold last winter and 24% said it was "much colder" than they would have liked, while 26% said their home suffered from damp or mould.

There are over three million children living in poverty in the UK, a figure that is predicted to rise. Poverty remains stigmatising, according to the survey of 2,000 children aged between 10 and 17, published on Tuesday.

Of those who said that their family was not well off, 55% said they had felt embarrassed and 14% had experienced some form of bullying as a result.

Hmmm I wonder how many answered they had an xbox, flat screen tv, sky and how many of their parents smoke. I'd be interested to know what questions where asked in this survey.

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Guest eight

Hmmm I wonder how many answered they had an xbox, flat screen tv, sky and how many of their parents smoke. I'd be interested to know what questions where asked in this survey.

Is it even possible to buy a CRT TV now?

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http://www.theguardian.com/society/2013/oct/29/uk-child-poverty-cold-damp-homes-finances

Hmmm I wonder how many answered they had an xbox, flat screen tv, sky and how many of their parents smoke. I'd be interested to know what questions where asked in this survey.

Also, how many have an expensive mobile phone contract and how much do they spend each week on takeaways and the lottery

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I'm just going from some personal experience here, it's a sad situation:

Designer clothes

MacDonald's

Friday night in the pub

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I'm just going from some personal experience here, it's a sad situation:

Designer clothes

MacDonald's

Friday night in the pub

Many of the poor's homes will be cold and damp because the quality of the housing they reside in is incredibly poor in itself.

Edited by 7 Year Itch

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Many of the poor's homes will be cold and damp because the quality of the housing they reside in is incredibly poor in itself.

Yes lets skirt the issue by claiming all of these people who live in Victorian era BTL squalor deserve all they get because they have an ipad!?!

I thought you were all being ironic boomers, but sadly it appears not. I'm sure going without a second hand PS3 will make all the difference in affording that extra £200 a month rent.....

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We spend 4K+ on fuel of varying sorts to heat/power the house.

It's always cold, we stopped fighting it and now we keep upstairs at 12C min.

Cutting the TV, mobilephones and xbox for the year would raise temp upstairs by 5C for a month.

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Seems like nothing much changes then.

I grew up in a cold damp council house, no central heating. In winter ice forming on the inside of the window sills and the all too often power cuts even denied us use of the 2 bar electric heater. I remember loads of us 'poor people' queing up at a local government building to be issued with a winter coat - either a pea grea parker or 5h1t brown duffle coat.

That feeling (almost a fear) of been freezing cold has never left me and in some ways neither has the feeling of being 2nd class and poor. We were marked by the coat (and itchy woollen trousers).

I can't judge too harshly poor people having a few nice things like a decent T.V or an XBox because what else is there?

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Yes lets skirt the issue by claiming all of these people who live in Victorian era BTL squalor deserve all they get because they have an ipad!?!

I thought you were all being ironic boomers, but sadly it appears not. I'm sure going without a second hand PS3 will make all the difference in affording that extra £200 a month rent.....

I thought we were discussing economic trade off's, heat the house or buy an ipad etc....

With little money you have these trade off's to make.

Cold house and something to do or warm house and bored.

It's also these types of questionnaires where the answer always seems to be more subsidy, whereas rebuilding the housing or extensive renovations may be better.

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http://www.theguardi...-homes-finances

Hmmm I wonder how many answered they had an xbox, flat screen tv, sky and how many of their parents smoke. I'd be interested to know what questions where asked in this survey.

I don't think it is entirely to do with the flat screen TV, xbox, etc, etc, that you mention above. In recent years I have lost count of the houses I have viewed, built anywhere from the 1890s through to the 1950s, which are simply big and cold. They are too big and too expensive to heat properly now.

All were designed with, and originally had, real open fires in several rooms - those open fires kept the houses warm and damp free. Nowadays, most do not have sufficiently big enough boilers to properly heat the rooms even if one kept the radiators on all the time. I lived in one such bug Edwardian house, with large rooms and high ceilings, and even the big radiators in each room left part of each room cold. Friends of mine used to live in similar places.

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Seems like nothing much changes then.

I grew up in a cold damp council house, no central heating. In winter ice forming on the inside of the window sills and the all too often power cuts even denied us use of the 2 bar electric heater. I remember loads of us 'poor people' queing up at a local government building to be issued with a winter coat - either a pea grea parker or 5h1t brown duffle coat.

That feeling (almost a fear) of been freezing cold has never left me and in some ways neither has the feeling of being 2nd class and poor. We were marked by the coat (and itchy woollen trousers).

I can't judge too harshly poor people having a few nice things like a decent T.V or an XBox because what else is there?

Nice post Singlemalt.

It can be very dangerous to see things from somebody else's point of view without the proper training.” ― Douglas Adams

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I don't think it is entirely to do with the flat screen TV, xbox, etc, etc, that you mention above. In recent years I have lost count of the houses I have viewed, built anywhere from the 1890s through to the 1950s, which are simply big and cold. They are too big and too expensive to heat properly now.

All were designed with, and originally had, real open fires in several rooms - those open fires kept the houses warm and damp free. Nowadays, most do not have sufficiently big enough boilers to properly heat the rooms even if one kept the radiators on all the time. I lived in one such bug Edwardian house, with large rooms and high ceilings, and even the big radiators in each room left part of each room cold. Friends of mine used to live in similar places.

Insulate the house, get the floorboards up on the 1st floor and put insulation between all the joists. Compartmentalise the house.

If they are big you can lose a few inches off each wall by putting in internal insulation.

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I don't think it is entirely to do with the flat screen TV, xbox, etc, etc, that you mention above. In recent years I have lost count of the houses I have viewed, built anywhere from the 1890s through to the 1950s, which are simply big and cold. They are too big and too expensive to heat properly now.

All were designed with, and originally had, real open fires in several rooms - those open fires kept the houses warm and damp free. Nowadays, most do not have sufficiently big enough boilers to properly heat the rooms even if one kept the radiators on all the time. I lived in one such bug Edwardian house, with large rooms and high ceilings, and even the big radiators in each room left part of each room cold. Friends of mine used to live in similar places.

Large houses in major cities have all but been either split up into bedsits, converted into small flats or knocked down to be replaced by flats.......gardens are car parks, trees cut down. ;)

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There is no excuse for any rented home being damp or mouldy. If LLs won't carry out proper repairs people must be encouraged to complain to councils, and councils must force LLs to comply. Why this isn't automatic for anyone making money out of BTL I cannot imagine. I guess a lot of tenants are afraid of confronting LLs who may try to intimidate them.

It was quite a while ago now, but one of my daughters was in a grotty rented house that did not have damp, but had a lot of other substandard factors, inc, dodgy wiring. Not having the highest opinion of councils in general I was very surprised at how effectively the council kicked in once she and her friends got them involved. The landlady had only subjected them to screaming abuse when they complained. The council found a whole load of stuff that needed doing, not just the things they'd mentioned, and gave the LL 6 weeks to do it all, or they'd do it themselves and charge her. She was mightily p*ssed off! but she did it all.

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There is no excuse for any rented home being damp or mouldy. If LLs won't carry out proper repairs people must be encouraged to complain to councils, and councils must force LLs to comply. Why this isn't automatic for anyone making money out of BTL I cannot imagine. I guess a lot of tenants are afraid of confronting LLs who may try to intimidate them.

It was quite a while ago now, but one of my daughters was in a grotty rented house that did not have damp, but had a lot of other substandard factors, inc, dodgy wiring. Not having the highest opinion of councils in general I was very surprised at how effectively the council kicked in once she and her friends got them involved. The landlady had only subjected them to screaming abuse when they complained. The council found a whole load of stuff that needed doing, not just the things they'd mentioned, and gave the LL 6 weeks to do it all, or they'd do it themselves and charge her. She was mightily p*ssed off! but she did it all.

Most homes built before about 1970 will suffer from condensation problems, often exacerbated by the introduction of double glazing. You will get some tenants that will not ventilate the property and careless cooking and drying clothes can be causal. Being unable to properly heat the house is a more understandable excuse with the fuel companies freezing pensioners as opposed to prices. Without demolishing old council stock it may be difficult to avoid mould if tenants do not take it upon themselves to air houses.

Edited by crashmonitor

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The problem with these surveys is where they draw the line that marks "poor".

In the US, when I was a kid living in a Detroit suburb, we had oil central heating and I dont ever remember being cold...until we moved to Ilford ( Essex) where my nan had no central heating, but a coal fireplace in the "living room",which she lit every morning in no time flat...Hot water came off the stove and we had to pour several jugs full of hot water to even have a bath.

However, in spite of all this "hardship", I never felt we were poor...most everyone else I met lived the same....outside toilets at school, the smog, no car....it was just life and we got on with it.

People today cant even light a BBQ.

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The problem with these surveys is where they draw the line that marks "poor".

In the US, when I was a kid living in a Detroit suburb, we had oil central heating and I dont ever remember being cold...until we moved to Ilford ( Essex) where my nan had no central heating, but a coal fireplace in the "living room",which she lit every morning in no time flat...Hot water came off the stove and we had to pour several jugs full of hot water to even have a bath.

However, in spite of all this "hardship", I never felt we were poor...most everyone else I met lived the same....outside toilets at school, the smog, no car....it was just life and we got on with it.

People today cant even light a BBQ.

Grew up in a large Victorian house with no central heating and just coal fires. From memory you don't actually feel the cold that much when you are a kid, it never really occurred to me that the house was cold.

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Grew up in a large Victorian house with no central heating and just coal fires. From memory you don't actually feel the cold that much when you are a kid, it never really occurred to me that the house was cold.

Yes...it only made you get dressed quicker...have we all gone all weak and pampered? :unsure:

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In recent years I have lost count of the houses I have viewed, built anywhere from the 1890s through to the 1950s, which are simply big and cold. They are too big and too expensive to heat properly now.

My house was built in the 1930's. When we bought it, the seller had run out of cash for oil and was running a few fan heaters. The inside temperature was 7'C (!!!!) in October when we viewed.

There was basically no insulation.

I had the roof stripped back to the rafters and put in 150mm of Kingspan (equivalent to 300mm rockwool) and breathable membrane to help get the moisture out. The house has a mansard roof (very efficient) so the whole roof and 1st floor is now very well insulated, enough so that the rising heat from downstairs is enough on it's own.

I buy insulation sheets by the truckload and put far more in the building regs require. Great return on investment for old houses.

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Hmmm I wonder how many answered they had an xbox, flat screen tv, sky and how many of their parents smoke.

Electronic entertainment is an incredibly cheap way to escape reality for a few hours (or decades). Nicotine is an addictive drug, so for most users even if they wanted to stop they literally wouldn't be able to.

Edited by Dorkins

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Most homes built before about 1970 will suffer from condensation problems, often exacerbated by the introduction of double glazing. You will get some tenants that will not ventilate the property and careless cooking and drying clothes can be causal.

It's not really the fault of the double glazing, only that you have shifted the problem to the next coldest point (walls).

More ventilation can help but you lose heat (expensive). It's better to insulate the envelope and ensure the roof is properly ventilated.

The only condensation I have is now on the outside of the windows.

I went for an unventilated warm-roof design with breathable membranes which pass the humidity to below the roof tiles where it gets blown away.

The technology required for a warm house is pathetically simple.

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I don't think it is entirely to do with the flat screen TV, xbox, etc, etc, that you mention above. In recent years I have lost count of the houses I have viewed, built anywhere from the 1890s through to the 1950s, which are simply big and cold. They are too big and too expensive to heat properly now.

All were designed with, and originally had, real open fires in several rooms - those open fires kept the houses warm and damp free. Nowadays, most do not have sufficiently big enough boilers to properly heat the rooms even if one kept the radiators on all the time. I lived in one such bug Edwardian house, with large rooms and high ceilings, and even the big radiators in each room left part of each room cold. Friends of mine used to live in similar places.

Huge, draughty Edwardian or Victorian sash windows are often the worst culprits IMO. Mr B's folks had a large (by modern standards) Edwardian house with huge windows. Despite central heating the bedrooms were bloody freezing in winter - except for their own bedroom where they'd replaced the window. It made the most massive difference. But there was no way they could afford to replace them all.

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Grew up in a large Victorian house with no central heating and just coal fires. From memory you don't actually feel the cold that much when you are a kid, it never really occurred to me that the house was cold.

I remember feeling cold....its a sort of damp cold that gets into your bones.

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