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Iceland Seeks Uk Funding For Subsea Cable Project

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http://www.theguardian.com/world/2013/oct/27/iceland-seeks-uk-funding-cable-project

Iceland's president Olafur Grimsson is expected this week to call on the British government to provide financial support for the construction of a £4.3bn subsea electricity cable – which will be the longest in the world – linking his country to the UK's electricity grid.

The ambitious project, drawing on hydro geothermal and wind power generation, could deliver five terawatt-hours a year to Britain at a cost 15% lower than offshore wind, according to Iceland's state-owned electricity firm Landsvirkjun.

Grimsson's presence at a conference in London on Friday, arranged by Landsvirkjun and the British-Iceland chamber of commerce, underlines the seriousness with which the project is being taken. The two governments have been exploring proposals for a cable after signing a memorandum of understanding last May. However, before the contract can be put out to tender the huge cost will have to be underwritten by British taxpayers.

Iceland enjoys the cheapest electricity prices in Europe thanks to abundant geothermal energy, wind and especially hydropower from glacial meltwater. The industry generates more than 12 gigawatt hours of electricity, about five times the demand from Iceland's 317,000 population.

I look forward to the physics geeks on here working out how much energy is lost in transmission.

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I'd estimate it to be about 1.21 Gigawatts.

That could be a problem if someone drives a speed boat over the cable at 88mph.

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I look forward to the physics geeks on here working out how much energy is lost in transmission.

I doubt it will be a lot, the technology is well proven:

http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/High-voltage_direct_current

In any case if the electricity if renewable and the Icelanders have far more of it than they need, then it's a bit of a moot point anyway if you ask me. One wonders how they ended up with such massive overcapacity- have they closed a few Aluminium plants recently?

Anyway as far as I'm concerned we should be all over this, much better idea than the huge taxpayer rip-off that is Hinckley C.

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Not physics boffins per-sey IRRO, its engineers who deal with this stuff, and more stuff.

There's a nifty website showing the worlds connectivity here.

HVDC Line losses

HVDC Light submarine cables for up to 320 kV DC

HVDC is going to be used. I don't know about the particular tie ins proposed at each end, however, there are plenty of IEEE papers on the matter, and they will be using VSC and MTDC technologies.

I imagine they will be installing a minimum of four single or dual core cables, likely with multiple integral fibre lines.

This cable run will need several joints will makes installation, both FFJ' and FIJ's. Offshore joining of cable is difficult and expensive. The most advanced cable layer today, the Lewek Connector, or similar vessel will be doing the work. Loading turntables at sea is equally as difficult.

Trenching will be difficult at this depth and with the sea states faced in open Atlantic.

Resistance on the cable will be in the region of a hundred or so ohms per length so losses won't be that high, especially as skin effect and reactive losses aren't applicable here. Calculating losses isn't possible without knowledge of the terminals at each end of the cable.

The lions share of the installation will be in the cost of the cable ship and support fleet with their specialist crew, FEED studies, surveying and development of the inverters and transmission networks at each end.

These are multi-billion dollar projects and there is equally as much capital being dumped into research in HVDC subsea power transmission, both in academia and industry.

cable-high-voltage-skagerrak-turntable200.jpg

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Not physics boffins per-sey IRRO, its engineers who deal with this stuff, and more stuff.

There's a nifty website showing the worlds connectivity here.

HVDC Line losses

HVDC Light submarine cables for up to 320 kV DC

HVDC is going to be used. I don't know about the particular tie ins proposed at each end, however, there are plenty of IEEE papers on the matter, and they will be using VSC and MTDC technologies.

I imagine they will be installing a minimum of four single or dual core cables, likely with multiple integral fibre lines.

This cable run will need several joints will makes installation, both FFJ' and FIJ's. Offshore joining of cable is difficult and expensive. The most advanced cable layer today, the Lewek Connector, or similar vessel will be doing the work. Loading turntables at sea is equally as difficult.

Trenching will be difficult at this depth and with the sea states faced in open Atlantic.

Resistance on the cable will be in the region of a hundred or so ohms per length so losses won't be that high, especially as skin effect and reactive losses aren't applicable here. Calculating losses isn't possible without knowledge of the terminals at each end of the cable.

The lions share of the installation will be in the cost of the cable ship and support fleet with their specialist crew, FEED studies, surveying and development of the inverters and transmission networks at each end.

These are multi-billion dollar projects and there is equally as much capital being dumped into research in HVDC subsea power transmission, both in academia and industry.

cable-high-voltage-skagerrak-turntable200.jpg

Whats the proposed capacity of this link? I am assuming it will be baseload so 5 TWH would require a capacity of approx 600MW

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One wonders how they ended up with such massive overcapacity- have they closed a few Aluminium plants recently?

Geography. They have more hydro and geothermal power than 300,000 people could ever hope to use

The aluminium plants (their current way of exporting power) are still running but the aluminium price isn't great at the moment. And exporting power directly is obviously better than via volatile energy intensive metals...

Whats the proposed capacity of this link? I am assuming it will be baseload so 5 TWH would require a capacity of approx 600MW

I've seen 1GW mentioned. No need to be baseload (apart from using the line as much as possible) The vast majority of Icelandic electricity is actually Hydro not geothermal (geothermal is used more for heating)

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