Jump to content
House Price Crash Forum
Sign in to follow this  
interestrateripoff

How Marriage Does Benefit Your Wealth, Health And Children..

Recommended Posts

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2477190/How-marriage-DOES-benefit-wealth-health-children--think-tank-used-say-didnt-matter.html

Married couples enjoy far greater wealth and health than those who cohabit, an influential think-tank revealed yesterday.

They are more likely to own their home, have better jobs and be more highly educated – and less likely to struggle to pay the bills.

They have less chance of splitting up and their children are less likely to smoke or take drugs, a report by the Institute for Fiscal Studies said.

A genius report, the highly educated or more likely to have higher paying jobs so naturally they are the ones who can afford to buy property. Someone earning £15k a year is going to really struggle to own property as they aren't hard working.

Social exclusion is growing.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2477190/How-marriage-DOES-benefit-wealth-health-children--think-tank-used-say-didnt-matter.html

A genius report, the highly educated or more likely to have higher paying jobs so naturally they are the ones who can afford to buy property. Someone earning £15k a year is going to really struggle to own property as they aren't hard working.

Social exclusion is growing.

Ridiculous article that just as easily be "only those with good jobs bother to get married, as anyone else would just lose their benefits"

Talking to a colleague yesterday about how he and is wife were now contemplating separating for purely financial reason, the tax credits and child benefit outweigh the cost of rental for his own flat!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ridiculous article that just as easily be "only those with good jobs bother to get married, as anyone else would just lose their benefits"

Talking to a colleague yesterday about how he and is wife were now contemplating separating for purely financial reason, the tax credits and child benefit outweigh the cost of rental for his own flat!

I'd had the same discussion. We'd be far better "single" because of the benefit structure and not be a "hard working family".

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In around 2007 I did a survey with one street and over half the houses/families in the "poorest" area of the town.Then I did the same from the "richest" part of town.I knew roughly the incomes from work in the "richest" as I knew their salaries,and I knew the benefits,wages and fiddles going on in the poorest.

The "poorest" had an average family income of £680 a week from benefits,wages and partners undeclared income 9 out of 12 houses had a partner not down as living there.The richest area had income of £760 a week.

The average hours worked in the poorest was 36 hours (including undeclared partners hours).The average hours worked in the richest was 76 hours.

The figures from lets say the middle range in the town would of been well below the "poorest" area.

It was looking like around 40%-60% of the benefits being claimed were fraud.In the 5 years I represented that community,nobody was prosecuted for benefit fraud.

The rough figures were on the estate 136 houses had undeclared partners.Nothing has changed since then.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Your numbers don't surprise me in the least, its has been obvious for some time by observing peoples life styles, also my own divorce situation that resulted in my ex being much better off financially once i had left.

how the hell did we arrive at this situation? I am lost how anyone voted for it or how it has been sustained.

I long ago came to the conclusion was that the best argumnent for low taxation was that high taxation just hands the country over to those who don't pay tax i.e. criminals

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In around 2007 I did a survey with one street and over half the houses/families in the "poorest" area of the town.Then I did the same from the "richest" part of town.I knew roughly the incomes from work in the "richest" as I knew their salaries,and I knew the benefits,wages and fiddles going on in the poorest.

The "poorest" had an average family income of £680 a week from benefits,wages and partners undeclared income 9 out of 12 houses had a partner not down as living there.The richest area had income of £760 a week.

The average hours worked in the poorest was 36 hours (including undeclared partners hours).The average hours worked in the richest was 76 hours.

The figures from lets say the middle range in the town would of been well below the "poorest" area.

It was looking like around 40%-60% of the benefits being claimed were fraud.In the 5 years I represented that community,nobody was prosecuted for benefit fraud.

The rough figures were on the estate 136 houses had undeclared partners.Nothing has changed since then.

Thanks Labour.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Or alternatively, only the more wealthy can be arsed spending thousands getting married in the first place, while everyone else is too busy merely paying the bills!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • The Prime Minister stated that there were three Brexit options available to the UK:   211 members have voted

    1. 1. Which of the Prime Minister's options would you choose?


      • Leave with the negotiated deal
      • Remain
      • Leave with no deal

    Please sign in or register to vote in this poll. View topic


×

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.