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Country Living In Wales Will Remain A Dream For Many Of Us, According To A Report By Halifax

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Odd, as I know so many people on Gower and in Mid-Wales who are absolutely desperate to sell - some of them have been trying for years.

Country living in Wales will remain a dream for many of us, according to a report by Halifax

For many of us it is the dream lifestyle, owning a pretty country home with a great garden and a stunning view.

But for most of us the rural dream will remain just that, not least because of the soaring cost of living in the countryside, according to a report by Halifax.

The bank’s report reveals the price of a home in rural Wales is 18% more than comparable property in our towns and cities, with average prices of a place in the country topping £154,000, compared with £131,184 for the average urban pad.

Estate agents have said the phenomenon is a growing one with buyers seeking the quality of the life the Welsh countryside can offer.

The ‘rural premium’ of £23,000 is more than the average full-time worker earns in a whole year.

http://www.walesonline.co.uk/news/wales-news/country-living-wales-remain-dream-6207346

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These people must like rain a lot.

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A good voice of reason in that article:

Delyth Davies, of Clee Tomkinson Francis, Carmarthen, said rural homes did tend to carry a premium.

“Rural homes are often more expensive than urban properties - but they are often very different, so there will be a difference in price. The rural dwellings are often more generous in size, with larger grounds, and offer countryside views and privacy. It is these factors that provide the premium.

Homes cost more when they are bigger and have more land, so there is in fact no premium for a rural location.

Nothing more to see here.

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Not so desperate to sell to reduce the price though. Why would you? When everyone is telling you 'property only goes up.'

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A good voice of reason in that article:

Homes cost more when they are bigger and have more land, so there is in fact no premium for a rural location.

Nothing more to see here.

The article is on the cover of the Western Mail's Property paper included in the main paper today - so, ramping article IMPO.

There are large parts of Wales where you really do not wish to live in the country due to remoteness - crime and healthcare being two.

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What rubbish. Transplant almost any Welsh rural home to London or even a decent market town elsewhere in England - and you'll see who is commanding a premium.

It is true that a place in the Welsh countryside is no longer as dirt cheap as they used to be. The main problem with housing stock in Wales is often poor maintenance and lack of mod cons due to lack of funds - meaning that some seem very poor value for the work required (especially when combined with the toll the weather can take on the house).

Edited by StainlessSteelCat

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Who on earth dreams of living in rural Wales?

It's a dank chilly dump with semi-hostile natives and sh1te food, the only bits of Wales worth a damn are Rhossili(which is fabulous and almost makes up for the rest), Pembroke and Snowdonia.

That said, if you like rain, as Pinny says....

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What rubbish. Transplant almost any Welsh rural home to London or even a decent market town elsewhere in England - and you'll see who is commanding a premium.

It is true that a place in the Welsh countryside is no longer as dirt cheap as they used to be. The main problem with housing stock in Wales is often poor maintenance and lack of mod cons due to lack of funds - meaning that some seem very poor value for the work required.

Absolutely. Imo Powys is probably the cheapest county on the UK mainland if you adjust for quality. There is no rural premium just a rural discount. Transplant any rual home to any suburban area and you increase the price 50% at least.

Transplant a five bed detached to a pseudo country lane in Nottingham suburbia and you can be looking at anything up to a million pound with universities and hospitals providing big wages. Buy one on a real country lane in the Lincolnshire Wolds where there is no work and it might be a quarter of the price.

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And backing up my point this is the suburban premium, a million quid gets you a four bed detached on the outskirts of Nottingham on a not particularly big plot. But hey it looks a bit like a rural location and most of Nottingham is crap so you will have to pay for rarity value.

http://www.rightmove.co.uk/property-for-sale/property-31012823.html

Probably worth paying that bit extra, a murder in the tougher quarters of Beeston less than a mile away this week..........

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-nottinghamshire-24577403

Edited by crashmonitor

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What rubbish. Transplant almost any Welsh rural home to London or even a decent market town elsewhere in England - and you'll see who is commanding a premium.

It is true that a place in the Welsh countryside is no longer as dirt cheap as they used to be. The main problem with housing stock in Wales is often poor maintenance and lack of mod cons due to lack of funds - meaning that some seem very poor value for the work required (especially when combined with the toll the weather can take on the house).

The main problem is Wales has such a poor economy/infrastructure/housing stock and in some areas house prices are eyewatering - try some coastal areas in the west. It's a depressing place to live, in my experience, due to poverty and a lack of social cohesion - some villages you have the holiday cottages on one hand and the natives living in the council house reservation. It's horrible.

Edited by gruffydd

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Who on earth dreams of living in rural Wales?

It's a dank chilly dump with semi-hostile natives and sh1te food, the only bits of Wales worth a damn are Rhossili(which is fabulous and almost makes up for the rest), Pembroke and Snowdonia.

That said, if you like rain, as Pinny says....

Yes that goes for much of Britain and Ireland generally. Actually, Irish food is even worse than ***** and I've lived there in the past! Pembrokeshire is chavvy and lacks any character these days. Snowdonia? Sure, if you like tourists.

Edited by gruffydd

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The main problem is Wales has such a poor economy/infrastructure/housing stock and in some areas house prices are eyewatering - try some coastal areas in the west. It's a depressing place to live, in my experience.

What's wrong with it Gruff?

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What's wrong with it Gruff?

It's got poorest economy in UK, with loads of social problems, housing problems, and so on - and no power to do anything to address the issues. Economic policy is determined by what's going on in SE England, yet the "people of Wales" just continue to vote Labour (for more of the same!).

Edited by gruffydd

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It's got poorest economy in UK, with loads of social problems, housing problems, and so on - and no power to do anything to address the issues. Economic policy is determined by what's going on in SE England, yet the "people of Wales" just continue to vote Labour (for more of the same!).

I've written a sentence similar to that so many times it could easily have been mine. Yes, the Labour party. The mill-stone around our necks. And still they're flying high in Welsh opinion polls.

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Absolutely. Imo Powys is probably the cheapest county on the UK mainland if you adjust for quality. There is no rural premium just a rural discount. Transplant any rual home to any suburban area and you increase the price 50% at least.

Any absolute statement like that is simply wrong. There are subtleties both ways. I'd like to buy in Bristol, where one bed flats can be found at over £200k (indeed last time I looked on RM, there were more 1 beds over 200k than under 100k). That's the premium for living in what's now officially the best city in the country :D If I went home to Somerset, there are many three bedroom houses with large gardens for far, far less than that. However. When I was younger, my sister's best friend moved from our country village to Weston super Mare, because they could get much more house for their money there. Despite Weston being suburban, with more facilities and quicker access to Bristol, everything else about it made it much more affordable than rural Somerset. So ups and downs, some areas are more expensive than others, and mere 'rural' or 'urban' doesn't explain it, it also involves economic vitality, access to jobs and services, desirability, etc.

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Any absolute statement like that is simply wrong. There are subtleties both ways. I'd like to buy in Bristol, where one bed flats can be found at over £200k (indeed last time I looked on RM, there were more 1 beds over 200k than under 100k). That's the premium for living in what's now officially the best city in the country :D If I went home to Somerset, there are many three bedroom houses with large gardens for far, far less than that. However. When I was younger, my sister's best friend moved from our country village to Weston super Mare, because they could get much more house for their money there. Despite Weston being suburban, with more facilities and quicker access to Bristol, everything else about it made it much more affordable than rural Somerset. So ups and downs, some areas are more expensive than others, and mere 'rural' or 'urban' doesn't explain it, it also involves economic vitality, access to jobs and services, desirability, etc.

Bristol is a good city. I lived in St.George for quite a while. It's the less expensive bit!

Now I am in Clevedon, which I quite like, except it has no useful shops.

If I go to the pier, I can see Wales. I went there a few times as I have a friend in Pembrokeshire. I didn't find it chavvy, and I liked the pub.

Edited by MrPin

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Bristol is a good city. I lived in St.George for quite a while. It's the less expensive bit!

Now I am in Clevedon, which I quite like, except it has no useful shops.

If I go to the pier, I can see Wales. I went there a few times as I have a friend in Pembrokeshire. I didn't find it chavvy, and I liked the pub.

A lovely story Mr Pin! what was your tibble?

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