Jump to content
House Price Crash Forum
silver surfer

Not Building Enough

Recommended Posts

Good data, thanks.

THEN AND NOW: THE HOUSING FIGURES

1996

Detached 61,700

Bungalows 11,000

Semi-detached houses 34,100

Terraced houses 25,900

Flats/maisonettes 23,600

2012

Detached 24,100

Bungalows 1,700

Semi-detached 21,600

Terraced houses 24,200

Flats/Maisonettes 33,900

Depressing too.

.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Leasehold flats are a nightmare! It's the last thing we need more of. Only make any sense in London. But that would be an older property, like Poirot would have lived in.

These new "cardboard" blocks will be demolished in 25 years. :ph34r:

Who takes the hit? Not the mortgage lender. :unsure:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Too true, I can never understand anyone buying a lease and having to do repairs to a building that they don't own.

Plus I like a good size garden, which you are not going to get with a flat or any new build.

I would buy a new build if a double size garden was an optional extra.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Leasehold flats are a nightmare! It's the last thing we need more of. Only make any sense in London. But that would be an older property, like Poirot would have lived in.

These new "cardboard" blocks will be demolished in 25 years. :ph34r:

Who takes the hit? Not the mortgage lender. :unsure:

Totally agree re: leasehold flats. I love the Art Deco style apartment blocks like Poirot's. What a shame developers can't build anything as architectually interesting as that nowadays. :(

To me, flats only make sense if they are run by a sole landlord who is the freeholder of the block eg: councils, Housing Associations or just one private concern. At least that way the onus for maintaining the block is solely on the landlord then.

That flat I live in has dreadful soundproofing and is about 25 years old. Probably getting near to it's sell by date. Meanwhile, my previous flat is likely still as solid as granite and will still be standing in a further 50 years! As will my parents' house built in the 1950s.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Totally agree re: leasehold flats. I love the Art Deco style apartment blocks like Poirot's. What a shame developers can't build anything as architectually interesting as that nowadays. :(

They/we can. but it will eat the profit. And will cost more so noone will be able to buy it without help (from Help to buy or bomad)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Too true, I can never understand anyone buying a lease and having to do repairs to a building that they don't own.

Plus I like a good size garden, which you are not going to get with a flat or any new build.

I would buy a new build if a double size garden was an optional extra.

A lot of houses in Manchester are leasehold, in fact you will be hard pushed to find a freehold property

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you look at the bedroom tax homes crisis - there's a shortage of suitable smaller accommodation for people to move into. There has always been a shortage of older person propertys too.

Despite them building millions of flats in Manchester over the last 12 years there is a shortage apparently.

If that is because they've been building trendy shite flats then that's the problem.

HMOs work in the private sector.

Maybe the social housing side needs to get that side of things going?

That way you'd have a much more flexible housing stock.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Totally agree re: leasehold flats. I love the Art Deco style apartment blocks like Poirot's. What a shame developers can't build anything as architectually interesting as that nowadays. :(

To me, flats only make sense if they are run by a sole landlord who is the freeholder of the block eg: councils, Housing Associations or just one private concern. At least that way the onus for maintaining the block is solely on the landlord then.

That flat I live in has dreadful soundproofing and is about 25 years old. Probably getting near to it's sell by date. Meanwhile, my previous flat is likely still as solid as granite and will still be standing in a further 50 years! As will my parents' house built in the 1950s.

Even private concerns have their pitfalls. most of the leases on flats in 80's blocks in Hertfordshire are owned by management companies based in the Channel islands, buying a flat and getting the lease sorted out properly can be a nightmare, loads of people who have put their flats on market in past have suddenly found the lease has been done incorrectly, as soon as the leaseholder has found out the flat is on the market the leaseholder has threatened to take legal proceedings to take possession of the flat (on the basis your lease isn't recognised!) Can be very expensive to sort out!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Stopped making these altogether, 1,700 completions the majority of which were probably housing association terraced ones and the rest minus front gardens on crammed in new build estates. In an ageing population they are sought after, but very wasteful space -wise. So the preserve of boomers that have already got em, no more supply.

http://www.google.co.uk/imgres?imgurl=http://imganuncios.mitula.net/2_bedroom_detached_bungalow_for_sale_home_for_sale_for_sale_norwich_97882431149492707.jpg&imgrefurl=http://property.mitula.co.uk/property/detached-bungalows-cringleford&h=414&w=552&sz=88&tbnid=tjElLdKeqDbotM:&tbnh=128&tbnw=170&zoom=1&usg=__cxVKCO1DBQiYiEb-GKiX5gBkcY0=&docid=pmZHGohiWSoxNM&sa=X&ei=CQBhUsacCcqbtQa85YGwDg&ved=0CDkQ9QEwBQ

Edited by crashmonitor

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Good data, thanks.

Depressing too.

.

and look how much house prices rose between 1996 to 2012. So much for the higher prices = increased supply argument.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

and look how much house prices rose between 1996 to 2012. So much for the higher prices = increased supply argument.

The number of new flats went up, new terraced houses are similar, but the number of larger family homes fell from 106,800 in 1996 to 47,400 in 2012! (If I added correctly the number of detached + bungalows + semi-detached above.)

And I bet the sizes of these new "detached" and "semi-detached" are much smaller than in 1996, and on much smaller plots too! Even the streets are narrower, and without parking space.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not building enough and building the wrong sort of properties,

http://www.independe...ge-8865160.html

any inside info how it is looking in 2013 ???

a lot of building regulations were reduced in 2013. and also planning process now requires that every council has to provide building plots permissions for next 5 years

perhaps it is the game changer ???

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I still don't believe this housing shortage. When I travel round the UK (admittedly not often) I see here and there emptyish, desolate looking housing estates and blocks of flats. It's certainly nothing like on the scale of Ireland or Spain, but I have not seen any thing like this in my almost 50 years. There is an estate near my parents, that has taken about 5 or 6 years to finally sell off. 30 or 40 years ago, the estate we lived on was basically fully occupied from the moment it was completete. Maybe I'm just looking in the wrong places, but it looks like a housing surplus to me.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I still don't believe this housing shortage. When I travel round the UK (admittedly not often) I see here and there emptyish, desolate looking housing estates and blocks of flats. It's certainly nothing like on the scale of Ireland or Spain, but I have not seen any thing like this in my almost 50 years. There is an estate near my parents, that has taken about 5 or 6 years to finally sell off. 30 or 40 years ago, the estate we lived on was basically fully occupied from the moment it was completete. Maybe I'm just looking in the wrong places, but it looks like a housing surplus to me.

What was the average price of those unoccupied houses on that estate? What's the employment situation locally and what are local average wages?

There is definitely a shortage of homes in the south east and the only ones available have ridiculous asking prices.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
the only ones available have ridiculous asking prices.

That's a pricing problem, not a shortage problem

Its true that my perception is probably overly influenced by my parents' region. North Scotland. Traditionally not good for employment, but there has been a lot of Windturbine work around lately, so Im not really sure of the current situation. I dont know the specif house prices, but prices generally are ridiculous there. Again, that is a pricing/credit/interest rates problem.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • The Prime Minister stated that there were three Brexit options available to the UK:   211 members have voted

    1. 1. Which of the Prime Minister's options would you choose?


      • Leave with the negotiated deal
      • Remain
      • Leave with no deal

    Please sign in or register to vote in this poll. View topic


×

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.