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A Brighter Future For Hardworking Tenants

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Press release from the DCLG:

A brighter future for hardworking tenants

Millions of tenants will get a better deal when they rent a home under new plans to help hardworking people, Eric Pickles announces.

Rogue landlords will be targeted in a new drive to stop people being ripped off when they rent a flat or house.

The ambitious package of proposals will ensure England’s 9 million private tenants:

  • avoid hidden fees from unscrupulous letting agents
  • get proper protection from rogue landlords
  • can request long-term rental deals that cut costs and provide stability for their family
  • feel confident to demand better standards and management of their property by landlords

[...]

Today Mr Pickles:

  • Announced that, within days, he would publish new regulations that will force letting and property management agents to join a compulsory redress scheme. 3,000 agents, 40% of the entire industry, have yet to join one of the schemes, which will ensure tenants’ complaints about hidden fees and poor service are investigated independently, and where a complaint is upheld, they receive compensation.
  • Revealed that, for the first time the government will publish a new code of practice setting standards for the management of property in the private rented sector, with a view to making it statutory to provide greater confidence for tenants in what they can expect.
  • Announced he will publish a draft of a new tenant’s charter. The charter will help tenants understand what they should expect from their rental deal, and how they can take action if they are the victim of hidden fees or poor standards of accommodation.
  • Set out the timetable for the introduction of a model tenancy agreement, which landlords can use to offer longer tenancies of 3 years or more, which will, provide extra security and stability for families.
  • Committed to produce extra guidance for local councils on how to protect tenants from illegal eviction, how to push for harsher penalties before magistrates for housing offences where these have a real impact on peoples’ lives, and to plan for new private rented developments in the future, including on their own land.

The Secretary of State also announced that:

  • A mortgage lenders summit will consider how lenders can make it easier for landlords to offer longer tenancies that benefit families.
  • The government will review the process by which tenants can raise concerns about the standard of their private rented property and the response they should expect from their council in enforcing standards of safety and hygiene.
  • The review will also consider requiring landlords to repay rent where a property is found to have serious hazards. This could include allowing councils to recoup housing benefit so that taxpayers’ money is not used to support landlords who provide sub-standard property.

More at the link below:

https://www.gov.uk/government/news/a-brighter-future-for-hardworking-tenants

Draft tenants' charter:

https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/251148/Draft_Tenants__Charter.pdf

Edit: added to quote, linked to draft tenants' charter

Edited by FreeTrader

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Press release from the DCLG:

More at the link below:

https://www.gov.uk/government/news/a-brighter-future-for-hardworking-tenants

Draft tenants' charter:

https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/251148/Draft_Tenants__Charter.pdf

Edit: added to quote, linked to draft tenants' charter

can request long-term rental deals that cut costs and provide stability for their family?

Request denied.

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So, other than make landlords join a compulsory tenant redress scheme, promise to enforce and get tough on current law and legislation and promote 3 year tenancies that can already exist between tenants and landlords....... not a lot then. One positive outcome is it might spook the amateur and 'wanna be' landlords out of the landlord profession, but that's about it.

What a wasted opportunity. <_<

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can request long-term rental deals that cut costs and provide stability for their family?

Request denied.

And yet later in the release Pickles is quoted as saying:

"These measures will also give tenants the know-how to demand longer-term tenancies..."

Big difference between 'request' and 'demand', but I imagine it'll be the former.

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And yet later in the release Pickles is quoted as saying:

"These measures will also give tenants the know-how to demand longer-term tenancies..."

Big difference between 'request' and 'demand', but I imagine it'll be the former.

Is this "model tenancy agreement" the one where the tenant takes responsibility for material repairs?

Er, no thanks. Transfer all you risk to me and wait for the capital gains to roll in? *****.

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1381950209[/url]' post='909412394']

Is this "model tenancy agreement" the one where the tenant takes responsibility for material repairs?

Er, no thanks. Transfer all you risk to me and wait for the capital gains to roll in? *****.

You give them far too much credit.

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Since about 1995, all politicians have had to pretend to like football, even though many of them had never been to a match, and didn't really understand the rules.

They just knew that 'ordinary people' really liked football, and so it was important that they were seen to like it as well, whatever it was.

I think hard-work is the new football.

Edited by (Blizzard)

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http://www.parliament.uk/business/committees/committees-a-z/commons-select/communities-and-local-government-committee/news/private-rented-sector-publication-note/

This part is actually not that bad, though I'd prefer no fees payable by the tenant seeing as the letting agent is the agent for the bloody landlord!

The Committee calls for all property listings and advertisements to list in full the fees a tenant would have to pay.
Edited by Dorkins

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http://www.parliament.uk/business/committees/committees-a-z/commons-select/communities-and-local-government-committee/news/private-rented-sector-publication-note/

This part is actually not that bad, though I'd prefer no fees payable by the tenant seeing as the letting agent is the agent for the bloody landlord!

9 Million of them. <_<

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Tenant: Please Sir, may I have a longer tenancy agreement for me and my family please to provide much needed family stabilty?

Landlord: F*ck off.

Cut whose costs?

When this stuff was talked about during the conference there was talk of tenants looking after the building fabric in return for 'stability'.

Just when you thought the market could not move further in favour of landlords.

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I remember watching a coalition politician being interviewed several months ago. Could have been Teresa May. Seems that her PA probably reminded her to emphasise 'hard working' families, men and women. Every sentence she uttered in response mentioned 'hard working' someone or other. Was rather surreal to listen to. :lol: Probably realised that the Tories can't solely rely on traditional Old Money Tory voters to get re-elected and that they represent us downtrodden souls too!

Seems like Pickles has just remembered that an increasing proprtion of the electorate are indeed private tenants. Must get these proposals in before the General Election, eh? ;)

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I'm guessing that Labour will put 'no letting fees payable by tenants' in their manifesto. It costs the public purse nothing, it will only harm a tiny number of people, it fits with their cost of living agenda, and they already did it in Scotland. I doubt that any of the parties will propose anything else of substance with respect to private renting.

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I'm sick of all this sucking up to the "hardworking" people.

When are we, the lazy, just-doing-enough-to-get-by, silent, can't-be-arsed majority, going to get some political pampering?

+1 I think they keep trotting out this "hard working people" line because they're desperate to stop the tide of people giving up and going down the tax credit route. They won't tackle tax credits for some reason they just want other to "work hard" to pay for it.

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I'm sick of all this sucking up to the "hardworking" people.

When are we, the lazy, just-doing-enough-to-get-by, silent, can't-be-arsed majority, going to get some political pampering?

Interesting, I've come full about turn and will be doing the absolute minimum to get by in life, workwise at least. A dual-income populus has societal challenges which are huge imo, regarding stable family lives. I'd rather settle for a smaller place and have the unconfiscatable luxury of time to spend making home life as high quality as possible within those constraints. Easier said than done perhaps but worth a go imo.

Unfortunately if you're a politico whose chief concerns are GDP and the pursuit of maximal usury, people with no interest in joining in are menaces to the fabric of society, which is why I expect we'll see little electoral incentives for people to stay home. Better to get them working and hand over 100% of earnings to the childminder, or even better, the bank.

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I'm guessing that Labour will put 'no letting fees payable by tenants' in their manifesto. It costs the public purse nothing, it will only harm a tiny number of people, it fits with their cost of living agenda, and they already did it in Scotland. I doubt that any of the parties will propose anything else of substance with respect to private renting.

it's a no-brainer - the Conservatives' retail "offer" is laughable. What about hardworking people facing "fines" from the bin police? Pickles was going to do something about that, and then the trail went dead.

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can request long-term rental deals that cut costs and provide stability for their family?

Request denied.

Landlords don't benefit from regular tenancy resignings. It's letting agents who make a bit of cash from annual tenancies.

A long term tenant is surely the aim of every landlord?

Letting agents have tons of nasty fees up their contracts which are mostly unfair.

Edited by SarahBell

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I'm guessing that Labour will put 'no letting fees payable by tenants' in their manifesto. It costs the public purse nothing, it will only harm a tiny number of people, it fits with their cost of living agenda, and they already did it in Scotland. I doubt that any of the parties will propose anything else of substance with respect to private renting.

I hope so. Soon after this announcement of nothing would be a good time politically for a Labour response, and they have started laying out policies for the next election now. It's a vote winner for sure. Everyone in the SE who's been through a few AST's will have been ripped off at least once, and everyone remembers being ripped off.

Side question - do those receiving housing benefit, while living in private sector rentals, pay letting agent fees or are they covered by benefits somehow? This has a big bearing on how many people feel directly affected by agency fees.

Q

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I hope so. Soon after this announcement of nothing would be a good time politically for a Labour response, and they have started laying out policies for the next election now. It's a vote winner for sure. Everyone in the SE who's been through a few AST's will have been ripped off at least once, and everyone remembers being ripped off.

Side question - do those receiving housing benefit, while living in private sector rentals, pay letting agent fees or are they covered by benefits somehow? This has a big bearing on how many people feel directly affected by agency fees.

Q

HB (LHA) only pays rent.

Some authorities may have schemes that help with bonds but not sure how many.

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Just to add, yesterday was in town and saw four places (one beds/studio's) for £270-290 a month. No bond required. Where I live these are 'social rent' levels. Undoubtedly sh*tholes but I wonder what will happen when 'unaffordable rents' fall below 'affordable rents.' :lol::blink:

I'm predicting serious distortion of the space/time continuum.

Edited by aSecureTenant

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HB (LHA) only pays rent.

Some authorities may have schemes that help with bonds but not sure how many.

Thanks, that's what I thought. Much better chance of the Scottish model given that, unless Labour don't want to appear to be copying the SNP.

I wonder how many letting agent fees are paid using Wonga loans. They can easily be several hundred pounds in the SE.

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A long term tenant is surely the aim of every landlord?

NL's view: http://nearlylegal.co.uk/blog/2013/10/mr-pickles-brighter-future-for-hardworking-tenants/

This didn’t stop some landlord organisations and journals getting terribly over-excited about the perceived threat of ‘required’ longer tenancies. There was (and remains) no such requirement.

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Interesting, I've come full about turn and will be doing the absolute minimum to get by in life, workwise at least. A dual-income populus has societal challenges which are huge imo, regarding stable family lives. I'd rather settle for a smaller place and have the unconfiscatable luxury of time to spend making home life as high quality as possible within those constraints. Easier said than done perhaps but worth a go imo.

Unfortunately if you're a politico whose chief concerns are GDP and the pursuit of maximal usury, people with no interest in joining in are menaces to the fabric of society, which is why I expect we'll see little electoral incentives for people to stay home. Better to get them working and hand over 100% of earnings to the childminder, or even better, the bank.

How else do you expect a landowner to maximise his economic rent if not by regularly milking his livestock then selling the carcass when the yield is no longer productive?

milking-machine_1004514i.jpg

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