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Lack Of Homes For Older People?

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Older people in homes too big for them because there are no suitable retirement-style homes for them? See http://moneyweek.com/merryns-blog/britain-needs-stop-building-wrong-sort-homes/

But I think an older person who has paid off his dream house will try to keep it, because it is what he views as home, instead of moving to a tiny retirement flat whose only benefit is a warden alarm... Basically, we all dream of being in overly spacious homes when we're older, don't we?

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Older people in homes too big for them because there are no suitable retirement-style homes for them? See http://moneyweek.com/merryns-blog/britain-needs-stop-building-wrong-sort-homes/

But I think an older person who has paid off his dream house will try to keep it, because it is what he views as home, instead of moving to a tiny retirement flat whose only benefit is a warden alarm... Basically, we all dream of being in overly spacious homes when we're older, don't we?

Not when we've paid the repointing/repainting and heating bills a few times, we don't...

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Downsizing is tricky.

Bungalows are the preferred option due to the history of flats being seen as horrific places to live.

They're often with huge gardens though and 2-3 bedrooms so not that much smaller than the houses they're leaving. They are not cheap either! And many of the 60s built ones look horrendously poorly insulated too.

Of course there are nice blocks of flats out there - small private ones - but it only takes one rotten apple to ruin a lot of people's lives.

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Older people in homes too big for them because there are no suitable retirement-style homes for them? See http://moneyweek.com/merryns-blog/britain-needs-stop-building-wrong-sort-homes/

But I think an older person who has paid off his dream house will try to keep it, because it is what he views as home, instead of moving to a tiny retirement flat whose only benefit is a warden alarm... Basically, we all dream of being in overly spacious homes when we're older, don't we?

No not all....who needs big indoor space when having a bigger natural outdoor space that doesn't need to be maintained but can be used as if it were your own....the right to roam, your home. ;)

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Of course there are nice blocks of flats out there - small private ones - but it only takes one rotten apple to ruin a lot of people's lives.

Yes - and this thing with the noise and how the council and police laugh at you if you object to parties at 3 in the morning next door has serious degraded life in the UK for many!

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Yes - and this thing with the noise and how the council and police laugh at you if you object to parties at 3 in the morning next door has serious degraded life in the UK for many!

This unfortunately has gone hand is due to changes in society from one based on community values to consumerism and entitlement. Those in charge are rich enough to keep any trouble far far away, the rest of society however doesn't have this luxury.

It is also being made worse by the government and media stigmatising those on benefits.

It looks more and more like this phase of civilisation is on the downward trend.

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You wouldn't be retiring to a normal flat would you? McCarthy Stone seem to be buying up plots everywhere however buying one of these flats depends on whether your existing home has made enough money and if you can sell it at market value! Which face it most people are going to struggle because their house in reality is overpriced and nobody can realistically afford to buy it!

Going to be a lot of little old ladies living in a room of a big 4 bed semi by themselves in years to come.

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Yes - and this thing with the noise and how the council and police laugh at you if you object to parties at 3 in the morning next door has serious degraded life in the UK for many!

Apparently this is not the case in Germany, where the police will respond to comparatively minor noise infractions. What is the problem with British society and agencies?

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Downsizing is tricky.

Bungalows are the preferred option due to the history of flats being seen as horrific places to live.

They're often with huge gardens though and 2-3 bedrooms so not that much smaller than the houses they're leaving. They are not cheap either! And many of the 60s built ones look horrendously poorly insulated too.

Of course there are nice blocks of flats out there - small private ones - but it only takes one rotten apple to ruin a lot of people's lives.

There are a number of problems with flat living for the elderly:

BTL has meant that blocks of flats are occupied by people who are not stakeholders so many do not treat the properties or other occupants with any respect.

Reguations concerning multiple occupancy are flouted and agencies do nothing about it. This creates various pressures on the property and the occupants.

There seems to be a one size fits all mentality by the developers. Room sizes are small, particularly kitchens. Alarm pull cords are mandatory as are communal meeting rooms. There is limited or no storage.

Charges are hiked up for 'services' which is a total rip off.

Often the flatted properties are located out of town on the assumption that the elderly want greenery around them instead of good access to all things urban. If they are built within the city centres the prices are hiked up

Overlying it all there is a 'God's Waiting Room' mentality which would deter many elderly.

The builders and developers say there has been a lack of demand for property generally, but they are not ahead of the curve for this potential market. There is considerable scope to build modern well appointed flats specifically for the over 50's or 60's, but offering the right mix of ingredients and in the right location.

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There are a number of problems with flat living for the elderly:

BTL has meant that blocks of flats are occupied by people who are not stakeholders so many do not treat the properties or other occupants with any respect.

Reguations concerning multiple occupancy are flouted and agencies do nothing about it. This creates various pressures on the property and the occupants.

There seems to be a one size fits all mentality by the developers. Room sizes are small, particularly kitchens. Alarm pull cords are mandatory as are communal meeting rooms. There is limited or no storage.

Charges are hiked up for 'services' which is a total rip off.

Often the flatted properties are located out of town on the assumption that the elderly want greenery around them instead of good access to all things urban. If they are built within the city centres the prices are hiked up

Overlying it all there is a 'God's Waiting Room' mentality which would deter many elderly.

The builders and developers say there has been a lack of demand for property generally, but they are not ahead of the curve for this potential market. There is considerable scope to build modern well appointed flats specifically for the over 50's or 60's, but offering the right mix of ingredients and in the right location.

The service charges thing is unlikely to be solved. This country is now run in the interests of parasites. If you can get into a situation where you can charge "fees" to people who have no choice other than to pay - this is a great country. Letting agents, solicitors, banks, property management - even utilities company charging "standing charges" - the thing they have in common is that they don't just charge for services used. They impose fees for nothing.

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There are a number of problems with flat living for the elderly:

BTL has meant that blocks of flats are occupied by people who are not stakeholders so many do not treat the properties or other occupants with any respect.

Reguations concerning multiple occupancy are flouted and agencies do nothing about it. This creates various pressures on the property and the occupants.

There seems to be a one size fits all mentality by the developers. Room sizes are small, particularly kitchens. Alarm pull cords are mandatory as are communal meeting rooms. There is limited or no storage.

Charges are hiked up for 'services' which is a total rip off.

Often the flatted properties are located out of town on the assumption that the elderly want greenery around them instead of good access to all things urban. If they are built within the city centres the prices are hiked up

Overlying it all there is a 'God's Waiting Room' mentality which would deter many elderly.

The builders and developers say there has been a lack of demand for property generally, but they are not ahead of the curve for this potential market. There is considerable scope to build modern well appointed flats specifically for the over 50's or 60's, but offering the right mix of ingredients and in the right location.

Many of those issues are problems for everyone irrespective of age- BTL farms, service charges, poor layouts etc. It says a lot about the UK that such comprehensively poor arrangements can nevertheless become the accepted norm.

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Many of those issues are problems for everyone irrespective of age- BTL farms, service charges, poor layouts etc. It says a lot about the UK that such comprehensively poor arrangements can nevertheless become the accepted norm.

Agreed, but my response was in the context of encouraging the elderly to vacate their larger properties where they have a great deal of control over their environment to purpose built flats that offer them a good degree of security and comfort.

I would reiterate that the builders are behind the curve. There is in IMHO a vast untapped market that has the funds to downsize to a more appropriate property and thus free up larger family homes. A win win!

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