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Ologhai Jones

Viewing A House Tomorrow

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I don't know what it signifies, but we're going to take a look at a house for sale tomorrow; the first time since we moved into rental nearly six years ago. (Actually, the first time since we bought our last house quite a few years before that, but anyway...)

How many of you folks are considering looking for the first time, or have recently started viewing here and there?

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I don't know what it signifies, but we're going to take a look at a house for sale tomorrow; the first time since we moved into rental nearly six years ago. (Actually, the first time since we bought our last house quite a few years before that, but anyway...)

How many of you folks are considering looking for the first time, or have recently started viewing here and there?

I haven't but I am in a the lucky position of having no great pressure to buy.

I can't imagine how difficult the pressure must be to but when the kids start hitting school age or after the partner and in-laws have stuffed the whole "renting is dead money" scenario down your throat year after year. :(

Don't beat yourself up about it though. You have your life to lead and sometimes you have to just grin and bear it. There are more important things in life I feel.

You never know, the market might crash next Monday... :D

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I don't know what it signifies, but we're going to take a look at a house for sale tomorrow; the first time since we moved into rental nearly six years ago. (Actually, the first time since we bought our last house quite a few years before that, but anyway...)

How many of you folks are considering looking for the first time, or have recently started viewing here and there?

i looked for 3 years.

asking prices went up....willingness to face reality went down ...government interference continued...land registry sale prices continued to fall....

eventually gave up looking and will now not buy until prices collapse or i can move out of the UK

enjoy the viewing...the agent will tell you they had an offer that very morning....:lol:

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I think it's fairly unlikely we'll buy any time soon.

It's (most likely) a bit of a shame for the sellers, but we're kind of going to remind ourselves what we might want in a house and to get ourselves back into the way of thinking about and discussing things we want and don't want, like and don't like...

But I can't deny... it's looking rather than not looking, which is, as I say, a first since we started renting.

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Haven't looked at anything for a couple of months. Really since the HTB price rises kicked in. Was looking at houses that I felt were 20k-30k overpriced but still saw buying as a possibility. Since HTB prices have jump another 20-30k in the areas I've been looking and I gave up looking, plus all the calls from EA's were getting on my tits!

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Had various ups and down about this over last 3 years. At the start of the year i allowed all that you need to buy renting is dead money to get on top of me, plus our landlord put the place we were renting onto the market. But likewise after being disappointed with what's out there and facing unrealistic expectations, which have all of a sudden started to be met by other people out there who must be desperate to buy i am starting to lose interest again. I think when you have worked hard to save hard for a decent deposit it becomes hard to part with it when you can see that the housing market is devoid of reality. People in the past didn't have to struggle as hard as we do now so were less fussy about what they were buying (plus they weren't buying on the back of the most exaggerated increase in price ever, along having to deal with govt intervention disguised as helping you on your way and predatory BTL brigade)

For now i don't mind renting even if its crappy flat that needs loads of work doing on it. The only worry i have is that this next boom will bring the whole economy down and govt of all colours have shown they will do whatever they can to maintain house prices regardless of the consequences, would hate to see my cash savings destroyed by hyper inflation. Can't say i am convinced that cash is king the way things are going

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I think you should play EA BINGO. Take a card along and cross out a line every time the EA says:

  • great location
  • lot of potential
  • other interested buyers/parties
  • priced aggressively
  • etc etc

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One little tip is to tell them when you want to view. Otherwise, they will try and get the viewings back to back so you can be scared by the competition.

I prefer viewing without the agent. Owners tend to be far more honest.

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One little tip is to tell them when you want to view. Otherwise, they will try and get the viewings back to back so you can be scared by the competition.

I prefer viewing without the agent. Owners tend to be far more honest.

I feel like that's what did--I said the only evening we could make this week was Tuesday, and the earlier the better. We ended up with 6pm this evening, so if the sellers got the time they wanted also, it was a fluke. ;)

I'm sure the estate agent said that the owners would be showing us.

Do you think there's any point in talking money with the owners? Or is it not the done thing?

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Do you think there's any point in talking money with the owners? Or is it not the done thing?

I do ..... and then usually get asked to leave :)

One lady (who was bankrupt) took my offer as insulting but then was forced to sell for even less than I offered.

Best thing I found was to say that my mortgage offer is only valid for xx days and they would have to make their mind about my offer very quickly or I wouldn't be able to buy even if I wanted to.

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I do ..... and then usually get asked to leave :)

One lady (who was bankrupt) took my offer as insulting but then was forced to sell for even less than I offered.

Best thing I found was to say that my mortgage offer is only valid for xx days and they would have to make their mind about my offer very quickly or I wouldn't be able to buy even if I wanted to.

I feel a bit nervous about it actually. If I do decide that talking to the sellers about the price is a good idea, I know that I can only make them an offer that'll offend them. Most sellers are, I suspect, not typical HPC material...

Even knocking 10% off, which seems rather modest to me, will make them gasp, I know it.

I don't think most sellers think of serious haggling (rather than messing about with what may as well be rounding errors) as even on the radar of possibility when they set their asking price. :(

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I feel a bit nervous about it actually. If I do decide that talking to the sellers about the price is a good idea, I know that I can only make them an offer that'll offend them. Most sellers are, I suspect, not typical HPC material...

Even knocking 10% off, which seems rather modest to me, will make them gasp, I know it.

I don't think most sellers think of serious haggling (rather than messing about with what may as well be rounding errors) as even on the radar of possibility when they set their asking price. :(

We need a lot more HPC front-line elite stormtroopers offering what it's worth to them on houses. I'm too timid to do it for the moment, and I'm not sure it counts for anything when so many compliant victims-of-media 'just wanted a home' ect sorts, wanting to pay fortunes. Actually there's been a few more realistic answers and outcomes since I last looked.

12-10-2013

Wanting to buy at £250k, what should I view?

We're hoping to soon be in a position to buy and would like to find something for £250k due to the jump in stamp duty for anything beyond that. So what should my cut off price be for viewings as we don't want to waste anyone's time. Before this whole help to buy thing I was thinking up to £280 and then offer the £250 but not sure that's realistic now as prices are rising. We're in the northwest. What would you do? Thanks.

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I feel a bit nervous about it actually. If I do decide that talking to the sellers about the price is a good idea, I know that I can only make them an offer that'll offend them. Most sellers are, I suspect, not typical HPC material...

Even knocking 10% off, which seems rather modest to me, will make them gasp, I know it.

I don't think most sellers think of serious haggling (rather than messing about with what may as well be rounding errors) as even on the radar of possibility when they set their asking price. :(

Seriously don't worry about offending anyone. They're in a market; it's a place for grownups, not the easily upset.

Of the few vendors that I've actually spoken to about their asking price, I've come across a mixture of people who are 1) surprisingly in agreement with me but understandably looking to get as much as they can, 2) utterly delusional and quickly brought down to earth with a bump, 3) Utterly desperate, and unable to accept less than their asking price.

It's the type 3) who get upset easily. An example of a type 2) was a guy trying to sell his 3 bed semi for £240k; I did some LR / Zoopla research and graphed it for him, pointing out that the highest a house had ever sold for in that street was £190k, and he immediately agreed to accept that. I'd changed my mind on the house by then anyway, so walked off leaving him shattered.

The type 1) are the hardest for me to deal with - they know their asking price is way over the odds, but they also know that some dickhead will come along and offer them that if they can hold out long enough. Whether the bank are in agreement is another matter of course.

So like many others, I've taken my ball home for now - I keep an eye out for sales that have fallen through but other than that I've no interest in playing this game until reality returns.

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Above anything, make sure any offer you make, gives them a decision to make. The potential vendor is not your bestest friend - just wants as much money they think they can squeeze out of you.

Make the offer you feel is right. Don't feel obliged to play games and offer less than you're after paying. Tell them that's your best and final offer.

You are allowed to laugh at estate agents when they try and tell you the vendor wants more, it doesn't mean you don't end up with the house. Just tell them you know it's their job to get as much for the house as possible but its in your interests to pay as little as possible.

Make the offer to the estate agent not the vendor.

Ring them back after 4 days and tell them they've got another day or two to make their minds up and then you'll be looking at other properties.

And go keep looking at houses.

It's good for you to see as many as you can.

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One little tip is to tell them when you want to view. Otherwise, they will try and get the viewings back to back so you can be scared by the competition.

I viewed a developers new build some months ago - great semi, but location wasn't perfect, and it was at the end of a cul-de-sac with a turning circle / drop off point for a primary school - twice a day in the working week you would be prevented from accessing your driveway by thoughtless parents (this would not be apparent to anyone without kids, viewing in the evening).

Anyway, as I arrived at the front door, a posh Asian gentleman came bounding down the stairs shouting about what a fantastic home it was, great finish, etc. He was shouting so loudly, and was so over-the-top enthusiastic about the place, so unnatural, that the whole thing was obviously staged for my arrival. (I suspect the pair of them were watching me walk from my car, up the driveway for their "cue")

The developer followed him down the stairs

Several months on the property is still for sale...

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I think you should play EA BINGO. Take a card along and cross out a line every time the EA says:

  • great location

  • lot of potential

  • other interested buyers/parties

  • priced aggressively

  • etc etc

Then raise your arm and shout 'HOUSE'!

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I viewed a developers new build some months ago - great semi, but location wasn't perfect, and it was at the end of a cul-de-sac with a turning circle / drop off point for a primary school - twice a day in the working week you would be prevented from accessing your driveway by thoughtless parents (this would not be apparent to anyone without kids, viewing in the evening).

I have no experience of owning a house.

It's strange - and I've said this on a thread before - but if I was going to pay a significant sum for a house that ws on an estate or semidetached, I would want to experience the house at all times of day, probably even spend a day or two living in it, for example to see whether you could hear every sound from next door..

After all, most would take a £500 secondhand car for a test drive.

On this basis I don't expect I'll ever buy a house :blink:

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Then raise your arm and shout 'HOUSE'!

Touché.

Thanks for the interesting words of advice, folks. It turned out to be somewhat academic for this viewing, as I don't think we're going to make any kind of offer on the house. It was nice enough, and I liked the location (one of a small group of fairly individual houses in a little cul-de-sac on the edge of town and across the road from a large area of fairly wild common land), but the kitchen was rather small and the bedrooms too (perhaps apart from the Master), especially as I'd want to use a bedroom as an office.

The half-hearted search goes on! ;)

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I have no experience of owning a house.

It's strange - and I've said this on a thread before - but if I was going to pay a significant sum for a house that ws on an estate or semidetached, I would want to experience the house at all times of day, probably even spend a day or two living in it, for example to see whether you could hear every sound from next door..

After all, most would take a £500 secondhand car for a test drive.

On this basis I don't expect I'll ever buy a house :blink:

There's something in that I think. I'm certainly not the same potential home-buyer I was the last time I bought one.

Incredibly, I recall looking at a handful of houses in an all-too-superficial manner, thinking, 'yep, this one seems okay,' and buying it. Seems crackers now.

But when I was a young'n, I remember going on a camping holiday in Scotland with two other chaps, and doing some pretty serious off-roading (including crossing rivers!) in an Austin Montego. 'Crackers' once again springs to mind. Sure as hell wouldn't do that now in anything less than a Defender--and even then, I think I'd be pretty nervous.

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There's something in that I think. I'm certainly not the same potential home-buyer I was the last time I bought one.

Incredibly, I recall looking at a handful of houses in an all-too-superficial manner, thinking, 'yep, this one seems okay,' and buying it. Seems crackers now.

But when I was a young'n, I remember going on a camping holiday in Scotland with two other chaps, and doing some pretty serious off-roading (including crossing rivers!) in an Austin Montego. 'Crackers' once again springs to mind. Sure as hell wouldn't do that now in anything less than a Defender--and even then, I think I'd be pretty nervous.

yes, know what you mean - but houses were cheaper then and Austin Montegos more expensive. proportionately.

The costs of making the wrong decision with a house are too great now, I think. Especially as so much of the new housing stock is cr4p high density properties all overlooking each other because the estate layout chose the 'higgledy-piggledy' look.

Then if the purchase is wrong, there is the hassle of selling on in a stagnant market - possible loss in value, cost of stamp duty, EA fees, removal costs, cost of your time looking for another property, not to mention the 'cost' of the sudden realisation a week after moving in of 'feck - what have we bought'.

Renting from a decent landlord has so many benefits.

I'm usually a cup half-full person - but with houses I definitely take the half-empty approach.

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I wouldn't buy now. Prices might well crawl up a bit over the next 5 years, but anything "made" will drop off (and the rest) once rates find reality again, BTL landlords become state cash cows, and all the artificial government propping becomes too expensive to continue.

Housing policy is due a political sea change in the next 20 years and the onus will be on forcing prices down to make them more affordable not appeasing (dead or dying) boomers.

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I'm usually a cup half-full person - but with houses I definitely take the half-empty approach.

Cups are always full if not in a vacuum. Some of the contents may be a liquid, some air but it's always full.

Estate Agents on the other hand, may indeed be empty.

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