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Frank Hovis

Where Did That Beer Go?

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Vanished beers.

Usually it's Double Diamond (works wonders) and Watneys Red Barrel namechecked but I was too young to drink those.

Ones I have drunk are and liked but which are now gone:

Castlemaine XXXX - one of my favourite lagers, I wondered where it had gone too and have looked it up to find it diisappeared in 2009:

XXXX was brewed under licence in the UK by InBev Ltd until 2009. It was commonly available in cans in British off licences and sometimes on tap in British pubs, although it was much less widely available than Foster's (which is found in many UK pubs). At 3.7% alcohol, the British brewed XXXX was somewhat weaker than most of the Australian variants. Castlemaine XXXX was withdrawn from the UK at the end of June 2009 when InBev's licensing agreement expired.[3]

Carling Premier gave me one of my worst hangovers ever, it must have been stuffed with chemicals to keep the head all the way down to the bottom of the glass. Liked the taste but never touched it since. Glad it's gone.

Newquay Steam Beer was superb, had a Grolsch-type bottle. And this is what happened to it:

Well ‘Newquay Steam Beer’ was a victim of its own success. It outsold the major beer seller in the southwest by miles. The competitor had to produce something better or lose out.

Their money men suggested that they should buy the rights to the name, the recipes and the artwork and sell it as their own. They were missing the secret ingredient and the flair to drive the brand forward and so after quite a short period of time ‘Steam Beer’ sank without a trace.

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Frank! Do you want to challenge the Pin, to a beer drinking competition? :huh:

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Frank! Do you want to challenge the Pin, to a beer drinking competition? :huh:

Mr Pin, surely you're not trying to tempt me with me beer on my dry month of October :o

I bet you'd buy Gazza a pint too!

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I had to check but, to my surprise, Mackeson...

Milk stout was believed to be nutritious, and was recommended to nursing mothers. In 1875, John Henry Johnson first sought a patent for a milk beer, based on whey, lactose, and hops.

is still available.

It is, however, a beer of mystery...

Whitbread acquired the brand in the 1920s and gave it national distribution, eventually turning it into the market leader for milk stout. Whitbread was purchased in 2001 by InBev. By this time it had been contract brewed by Young's Brewery of Wandsworth for some time. Production was then moved to Cameron's Brewery of Hartlepool before moving to Hydes Brewery in Manchester. The current brewing location is unknown.

...

For some years now, Mackeson has been a 'ghost brand' in the UK - still produced and sold but without advertising or promotion.

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Help required....is barley wine a beer or a wine? ;)

Don't know but this from CAMRA has me planning for November already :)

Barley Wine

Barley Wine is a style that dates from the 18th and 19th centuries when England was often at war with France and it was the duty of patriots, usually from the upper classes, to drink ale rather than Claret.

Barley Wine had to be strong - often between 10% and 12% -- and was stored for prodigious periods of as long at 18 months or two years. When country houses had their own small breweries, it was often the task of the butler to brew ale that was drunk from cut-glass goblets at the dining table. The biggest-selling Barley Wine for years was Whitbread's 10.9% Gold Label, now available only in cans. Bass's No 1 Barley Wine (10.5%) is occasionally brewed in Burton-on-Trent, stored in cask for 12 months and made available to CAMRA beer festivals. Fuller's Vintage Ale (8.5%) is a bottle-conditioned version of its Golden Pride and is brewed with different varieties of malts and hops every year.

Many micro-brewers now produce their interpretations of the style. Expect massive sweet malt and ripe fruit of the pear drop, orange and lemon type, with darker fruits, chocolate and coffee if darker malts are used. Hop rates are generous and produce bitterness and peppery, grassy and floral notes.

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I had to check but, to my surprise, Mackeson... ]

[\quote]

I loved drinking it, only a few sips though, when my mother was prescribed it. Milk stout, rather than Mandelson, (spell checker keeps changing the brand name to a Machiavellian politician and I can't change it back to the word I want), was much sweeter and more pleasant to my palette at the age I was.

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XXXX and Premier?

You don't deserve to drink beer. You should stay dry. Permanently.

+1. Castlemaine wasn't 'brewed' as such, they just re-plumbed the urinals in Australian bars straight back into the beer barrels.

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I loved drinking it, only a few sips though, when my mother was prescribed it. Milk stout, rather than Mandelson, (spell checker keeps changing the brand name to a Machiavellian politician and I can't change it back to the word I want), was much sweeter and more pleasant to my palette at the age I was.

Mackeson for mum, gripe water for junior.

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Oddly enough I was thinking about Castlemaine XXXX the other day and wondering how long ago it was when I last asked for it in a pub.

I was never keen on Carling lager. Although most lagers pretty much tasted the same to me, there was something I really disliked about it.

I tend to drink real ale these days. And Guinness. :) Still like Carlsberg lager though.

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Help required....is barley wine a beer or a wine? ;)

A pub I visited once or twice in Crouch End sold Russian Stout. Alcohol content must have been well over 10%, only sold in 1/3 pint bottles. Got drunk on some once, when I woke the next morning I was still smiling.

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A pub I visited once or twice in Crouch End sold Russian Stout. Alcohol content must have been well over 10%, only sold in 1/3 pint bottles. Got drunk on some once, when I woke the next morning I was still smiling.

Were you still in the pub?

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+1. Castlemaine wasn't 'brewed' as such, they just re-plumbed the urinals in Australian bars straight back into the beer barrels.

Australians don't mark their beers with four X's out of ignorance Lewis.

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Harp - Guiness lager, might be around but don't see it

Hoffmeister (3.2% abv pale lager produced by Scottish Courage) lol, wouldn't drink anything near that low now I've fallen in love with 7% Polish beers.

Also take note when you buy beers in the supermarkets these days. Stella has gone from 5.2 - 5 - 4.8% so those deals aren't quite so good as you think.

Stick to £1 a can Polish beers from off licenses (500ml too). Best beers and best bang for buck you can get. I imagine they're so cheap as the correct duty isn't paid on them.

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Bulldog strong pale ale by Courage. A beer which had won awards in Belgium where they take such things seriously. Courage gave it no promotion for years then dropped it. I mourned.. .

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Guest eight

I had to check but, to my surprise, Mackeson...

I used to work behind the bar in a WMC. Admittedly it was 15 or so years ago but Mackesons was surprisingly popular. Likewise Snowballs and such as Campari. I'd imagine it's changed a bit as half of those regulars will have shuffled off their perches by now.

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Guest eight

Oddly enough I was thinking about Castlemaine XXXX the other day and wondering how long ago it was when I last asked for it in a pub.

All part of that weird mid 80's fixation with anything Australian. They tried to get Tooheys in as well, without much success.

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Harp - Guiness lager, might be around but don't see it

Hoffmeister (3.2% abv pale lager produced by Scottish Courage) lol, wouldn't drink anything near that low now I've fallen in love with 7% Polish beers.

Also take note when you buy beers in the supermarkets these days. Stella has gone from 5.2 - 5 - 4.8% so those deals aren't quite so good as you think.

Stick to £1 a can Polish beers from off licenses (500ml too). Best beers and best bang for buck you can get. I imagine they're so cheap as the correct duty isn't paid on them.

About 20 years ago I was out on a student night around Union street in Plymouth. In one of the clubs they were giving out free pints of Hoffmeister and yet a very low percentage of the impoverished students would go near it. Everyone seemed to be drinking alcopop varients. I had a few but I suspected that it had been watered down but very difficult to tell due to the original strength.

Also I used to 'bottle up' for a local pub and remember that the most popular bottled beer was Manns brown ale. Mackeson Stout was also fairly popular. Was an old mans pub.

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