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Wood Burning Stoves - Thoughts Please

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We have a really cruddy gas fire that doesn't seem to give off any heat so we were thinking of replacing it this year.

Wood burners have become very popular and wanted to know if anyone has one, would they recommend them or would you steer clear?

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We have a really cruddy gas fire that doesn't seem to give off any heat so we were thinking of replacing it this year.

Wood burners have become very popular and wanted to know if anyone has one, would they recommend them or would you steer clear?

Depends.

Some here may recall my thread back in 2008 when I put a stove in my house. It will certainly cost you a lot more than putting in a descent high efficiency gas fire.

If you have a good supply of free / cheap firewood then its probably worthwhile. They are a good back in the advent of a power cut. Probably a good sales point if selling house. If you have a free / cheap supply of wood there is a satisfaction in not lining the energy CO's pockets.

Downside - they take some work and smoke emissions can be an issue if you don't get the burn right. Cutting up wood can be a chore too.

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We have a really cruddy gas fire that doesn't seem to give off any heat so we were thinking of replacing it this year.

Wood burners have become very popular and wanted to know if anyone has one, would they recommend them or would you steer clear?

If you choose well and have a good source of cheap wood (I knew someone who lived near a lumber yard and they'd let him fill his van up with offcuts for 10 quid) they're OK. I forget the name of his, it heats a massive space plus the radiators in the rest of the house in minutes.

If you plan on buying neatly cut/stacked logs from the local logman and you want to have the place looking as twee as a Swiiss chalet with neatly stacked piles of logs then it won't be cheap, get a heat pump.

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We have a stove in which we burn a combination of wood and smokeless coal. Really does a good job of heating up a good portion of the house, and I certainly appreciate having it.

Your decision would depend on how you view the stove. Is it nice and cozy to have a wood fire burning, or is it just a pain to have to deal with the mess of the ashes and having to light it. It does definitely require more work than simply flipping a switch. I haven't found it that hard to find a reasonably priced source of wood, but you need to have a place you can store it outside.

It's also maybe getting late in the year to have a stove installed if you want it for this winter. In the last house that I lived (which was rented), the landlord agreed to install a wood burner, but it took about six months for the shop to get the correct model in stock and then to install it.

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I've got two massive burners in my place. One of them does rads, water and underfloor heating. I don't pay for logs but i have to cut and split and drag them up from the valley with quad bike and trailer. To be honest, after nearly twenty years I'm pretty sick of it. If I spent the same amount of time at work as i do messing with firewood the money earned would pay for an easier alternative.

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We've got a small stove in the front room and getting another one soon for the bigger rear kitchen/family room. I love having it - it's an excellent backup incase of zombie uprising, and it creates a cosy winter atmosphere when it's dark and freezing outside. If I bought ready split logs it wouldn't be cheap, but we've been burning building offcuts for two winters now and we still have a lot left. (we had a house extension built).

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I would really like a log burner in my next house, not for the particularly freezing days but days like today when it is 12c and the sun hasn't come out all day. I know I will need my heating on tonight for an hour - but I much rather through a couple of logs on a fire and let it burn out.

How long would a tonne bag of split logs (not a tonne specifically, just the bag as that's what they seem to be delivered in) last if you run the burner every night through winter? Those bags seem to be around £50-80 (seasoned logs) delivered.

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I would really like a log burner in my next house, not for the particularly freezing days but days like today when it is 12c and the sun hasn't come out all day. I know I will need my heating on tonight for an hour - but I much rather through a couple of logs on a fire and let it burn out.

How long would a tonne bag of split logs (not a tonne specifically, just the bag as that's what they seem to be delivered in) last if you run the burner every night through winter? Those bags seem to be around £50-80 (seasoned logs) delivered.

I have a log burner in the living room, and about 4 of the above bags would be needed for an entire Winter. If you buy a flat-bed load they are a fair bit cheaper. But my cottage is terribly insulated, so you might get away with a lot fewer.

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We have a really cruddy gas fire that doesn't seem to give off any heat so we were thinking of replacing it this year.

Wood burners have become very popular and wanted to know if anyone has one, would they recommend them or would you steer clear?

I would love one, but it would mean putting in a flue since we have no chimney. Not to mention rearranging the entire sitting room and losing a sofa on the outside wall. But I.d still like to do it, so as not to be totally dependent on gas for heating.

My brother has one, probably larger than he needs for the size of room, but he has fixed up a device that wafts the warm air into the hall and the rest of the house. They hardly need their heating on in winter. Also he cooks things like soup and casseroles on the flat top. Works very well for them, and he seems to get loads of freebie wood from all over the place.

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I would love one, but it would mean putting in a flue since we have no chimney. Not to mention rearranging the entire sitting room and losing a sofa on the outside wall. But I.d still like to do it, so as not to be totally dependent on gas for heating.

My brother has one, probably larger than he needs for the size of room, but he has fixed up a device that wafts the warm air into the hall and the rest of the house. They hardly need their heating on in winter. Also he cooks things like soup and casseroles on the flat top. Works very well for them, and he seems to get loads of freebie wood from all over the place.

I have a Westfire 21 in my house with a flat top. Used to heat up kettles of water for washing up, dishwasher, bath, washing machine. Also cook food on it. Back in the TFH days of 2009/10! :D

http://www.stovesonline.co.uk/wood_burning_stoves/Westfire-21-wood-stove.html

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We have a really cruddy gas fire that doesn't seem to give off any heat so we were thinking of replacing it this year.

Wood burners have become very popular and wanted to know if anyone has one, would they recommend them or would you steer clear?

Are there any no smoke zones? I think it applies to open fires, woodburners are ok if they are rated I think.

I haven't got one but have been in a few pads with them in and they are ace for looking at the flames and the woodburner heat is lovely and cosy.

issues would be collecting for free and chopping, plus storage.

Need to get it installed properly and certified nowadays (I think). for piece of mind and insurance i would either way anway.

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Arthur Leafmould swears by his woodburner..

Arthur bluddy Leafmould swears all over the place, I heard from the fellas down Upper Felching.

Got my dual-fuel woodburner going today. Eats wood like pigeons eat young broccoli, that's damn fast. Little ash though, compared to anthracite. And I can put the ash on the garden (not recommended for coal ash). If you throttle a woodburner back, it smokes rotten, like a damp bonfire. Ok for you inside, but the neighbours will cop it.

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Arthur bluddy Leafmould swears all over the place, I heard from the fellas down Upper Felching.

Got my dual-fuel woodburner going today. Eats wood like pigeons eat young broccoli, that's damn fast. Little ash though, compared to anthracite. And I can put the ash on the garden (not recommended for coal ash). If you throttle a woodburner back, it smokes rotten, like a damp bonfire. Ok for you inside, but the neighbours will cop it.

Never a good idea and smoke is wasted fuel!

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Arthur Leafmould swears by his woodburner..

You said "Bolllocks" and "Cant" near it, didn't you! ;)

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wood if ready cut is getting expensive - I burn around £200 worth per winter but reserve the stove lighting for coldest/ frostiest days |(don't keep it in all the time) and I have a cold rural cottage :D

my stove is a clearview which I rate the best (had a villager in a previous house which was a pain to keep burning) as it can be turned right down and still burn away merrily.

the cost of installation (hetas regulations) is high as a chimney liner is required but they are a good selling point when it is time to move on.

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If you have gas then you'll never beat it price wise with a woodburner. Even if you get free wood you still need to chop and split so need to buy a chainsaw (I have a hand bow saw for the odd bits I get) plus the cost of buying and installing the stove and sweeping the chimney at least once a year.

Saying all that though it's not all about the cost. There's nothing better than getting the fire going and I enjoy sawing and splitting the logs I get from family and friends. Plus you will be toasty and warm when the power goes out mid winter!

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If you have gas then you'll never beat it price wise with a woodburner. Even if you get free wood you still need to chop and split so need to buy a chainsaw (I have a hand bow saw for the odd bits I get) plus the cost of buying and installing the stove and sweeping the chimney at least once a year.

Saying all that though it's not all about the cost. There's nothing better than getting the fire going and I enjoy sawing and splitting the logs I get from family and friends. Plus you will be toasty and warm when the power goes out mid winter!

So wouldn't a normal fireplace, wood or coal suffice to supplement the radiator for the very cold days? ;)

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So wouldn't a normal fireplace, wood or coal suffice to supplement the radiator for the very cold days? ;)

Yes of course, I've always wanted an open fire but my house came with a stove already. They are much more efficient though and an open fire will cost even more in wood! I do run my with the doors open for an hour or so each day as unfortunately mine had solid doors and no glass.

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We run the entire house on wood (dhw, heating, some cooking) with a combination of a Rayburn and a big Clearview stove. I second the clearview recommendation they are the mutts nuts.

If you are doing wood seriously, the economics are simple. We have zero heating bills, as in nothing. We laugh in the face of gas price rises as we have no gas, oil, or electric heating. We do have an immersion for the few months we need it. On the flip side, I've spent a lot on chainsaws, expensive axes, a 3 tonne trailer and it justifies my stupid Land Rover.

The.problem with wood is that if you are paying for seasoned logs to be delivered, you might as well be on gas. It is cheaper and more convenient. So you need to like getting wood in. My speciality is big trunks - the local tree surgeons call me up when they have something that would take them ages to process, and I slice it up on site (got a really big saw, the biggest they make, probably). Great fun, and a good morning consists of getting > 10 tonnes of wood in from a local farm. I then slice and split at my leisure, good exercise.

If you are doing this properly, you need somewhere to dry store several tonnes of wood, because it takes at least a year to dry, preferably 2. I've stacked and split 2015s wood, and I'm now on the scrounge for 2016/17.

Summary: if you buy wood, don't bother. If you like wood, have somewhere to work and store it, then go for it. I don't see the point in a half hearted effort because stoves are so damn expensive to install if you follow building regs and get some expensive "qualified" bloke to install it.

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We run the entire house on wood (dhw, heating, some cooking) with a combination of a Rayburn and a big Clearview stove. I second the clearview recommendation they are the mutts nuts.

If you are doing wood seriously, the economics are simple. We have zero heating bills, as in nothing. We laugh in the face of gas price rises as we have no gas, oil, or electric heating. We do have an immersion for the few months we need it. On the flip side, I've spent a lot on chainsaws, expensive axes, a 3 tonne trailer and it justifies my stupid Land Rover.

The.problem with wood is that if you are paying for seasoned logs to be delivered, you might as well be on gas. It is cheaper and more convenient. So you need to like getting wood in. My speciality is big trunks - the local tree surgeons call me up when they have something that would take them ages to process, and I slice it up on site (got a really big saw, the biggest they make, probably). Great fun, and a good morning consists of getting > 10 tonnes of wood in from a local farm. I then slice and split at my leisure, good exercise.

If you are doing this properly, you need somewhere to dry store several tonnes of wood, because it takes at least a year to dry, preferably 2. I've stacked and split 2015s wood, and I'm now on the scrounge for 2016/17.

Summary: if you buy wood, don't bother. If you like wood, have somewhere to work and store it, then go for it. I don't see the point in a half hearted effort because stoves are so damn expensive to install if you follow building regs and get some expensive "qualified" bloke to install it.

Thanks for all the replies.

It was a Clearview that we were looking at along with all the proper fitting from a qualified company but I would say that your sentence about being half hearted sums me up. Storing won't be a problem for us but I'm not entirely confident that Mr B's enthusiasm for sourcing and chopping won't wear a bit thin after a year or two. Based on that assumption, I could see us having to pay for seasoned logs on the whole. I like the idea of running the radiators off it but again, I would guess, that will make the whole installation more expensive.

Whatever we decide has to be for the very long term so I want to establish what I'm getting myself into before we shell out. There's also part of me that seems to think there's been a bit of a hype around them recently, talk of them being a selling point being one of them and that they are, for some, an aspirational piece. The idea of sitting around a real fire is lovely but the reality of runnning it is, perhaps, not so dreamy.

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We have an open fire in the living room and are thinking of getting a stove put in the dining room.

To be honest, solid fuel is a faff. We burn a mix of wood and coal and both involve a lot of hard, cold, dirty, physical work. Unlike gas, you cant just set a thermostat and forget about solid fuel fires and unlike gas, you have to clear the ashes each morning which is again, a filthy chore.

That said, there's nothing quite like have a real fire and it was a godsend when the boiler packed up last winter (although the daily routine of 'come home from work, sweep the ashes, lay the fire, light the fire' was wearing a bit thin after four weeks)..... but otherwise its strictly an aspirational/fashion/lifestyle/luxury/Ooo isnt it luverly, type of thing.

For actually heating the house on a regular basis, gas is by far the cheaper and most convenient option - even if you have access to free wood, it will take quite a while to amortise the astronomical cost of the stove, its installation, and ongoing maintenance.

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I'd love one, but my house is too modern, and doesn't have proper fireplaces! It's a bit of a shitter, when you have just done a "casual" killing, and have to get rid of body parts! I have to drive! ;)

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I'd love one, but my house is too modern, and doesn't have proper fireplaces! It's a bit of a shitter, when you have just done a "casual" killing, and have to get rid of body parts! I have to drive! ;)

No visiting foxes you could feed chopped-up bits to? I could send some of ours round.

we haven't got a fireplace either but a flue could go on the outside wall. Might get around to it eventually, but kitchen needs doing first, 25 yrs old and looking it, bits falling off, but of course mr b not bovvered as long as it can still produce shepherd's pie.

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No visiting foxes you could feed chopped-up bits to? I could send some of ours round.

we haven't got a fireplace either but a flue could go on the outside wall. Might get around to it eventually, but kitchen needs doing first, 25 yrs old and looking it, bits falling off, but of course mr b not bovvered as long as it can still produce shepherd's pie.

[/quote

Out of real Shepherds I guess? ;)

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