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StuG III

Open Office Getting The Sack!

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Seriously, so I try and update my Oo Calc and lo and behold I find not one but two pieces of adware installing themselves and crashing my brower repeatedly!

Thats it. I'm getting MS Office and be damned with it.

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Seriously, so I try and update my Oo Calc and lo and behold I find not one but two pieces of adware installing themselves and crashing my brower repeatedly!

Thats it. I'm getting MS Office and be damned with it.

Kingston Office seems very similar to MS Office.

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Its not just Oo that being a pain. It seems to be an increasing trend for software packages to try and install more and more unwanted and irritating programs without permission these days. I have abandoned Adobe reader and rage-uninstalled all Apple software after both of these started to run unwanted processes that there didnt seem to be anything I could do about.

Thanks for the tips about the alternatives.

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It seems to be an increasing trend for software packages to try and install more and more unwanted and irritating programs without permission these days

Google's Chrome browser has been a real pain for a year or two now. I've accidentally installed it with something else a number of times. On some occasions it's been a ticked-by-default option (that I somehow manage to miss even though I look out for these things), on others I swear I haven't even been asked.

The two least computer-literate people I know are both running Chrome as their default browser on their Windows machines. I wonder how much of its success is down to long-suffering users sighing and putting up with the slightly-different thing the computer now throws at them..

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Google's Chrome browser has been a real pain for a year or two now. I've accidentally installed it with something else a number of times. On some occasions it's been a ticked-by-default option (that I somehow manage to miss even though I look out for these things), on others I swear I haven't even been asked.

The two least computer-literate people I know are both running Chrome as their default browser on their Windows machines. I wonder how much of its success is down to long-suffering users sighing and putting up with the slightly-different thing the computer now throws at them..

Strangely, I sacked Firefox because it seemed to want to move into my living room too.... I fear for the future.

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Did you download it from the right place?

Typically the ad supported search results install spyware.

Make sure you download it from openoffice.org.

Having said that I use libreoffice these days.

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Did you download it from the right place?

Typically the ad supported search results install spyware.

Make sure you download it from openoffice.org.

Having said that I use libreoffice these days.

I think so. It was in the update software box in the bottom right of the Win7 screen.

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Strangely, I sacked Firefox because it seemed to want to move into my living room too.... I fear for the future.

I picked up my first tablet a few weeks ago - a £79 Nook HD running Android. I still don't use a smartphone.

I loaded up a few 'free' and open source apps and utilities.

The sheer intrusiveness of the software; what it wants to access on the tablet and the volume of background traffic going back and forth on my internet connection is jaw-dropping. (edit: Maybe because I haven't become gradually accustomed to it).

There is absolutely no ****ing way any data I wish to keep private or secure is going on that ****ing thing.

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Guest eight

I picked up my first tablet a few weeks ago - a £79 Nook HD running Android. I still don't use a smartphone.

I loaded up a few 'free' and open source apps and utilities.

The sheer intrusiveness of the software; what it wants to access on the tablet and the volume of background traffic going back and forth on my internet connection is jaw-dropping. (edit: Maybe because I haven't become gradually accustomed to it).

There is absolutely no ****ing way any data I wish to keep private or secure is going on that ****ing thing.

Taped over the cameras yet?

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I've noticed a lot of free software now comes bundled with several opt out options. Can't remember what it is now but one the opt out appears greyed out as if you couldn't select it of course you can but it does appear to be a nice psychological piece of engineering to suggest you can't. I think it would install a trial of some utilities software.

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Did you download it from the right place?

Cnet, 01net, clubic, filehippo, Download.com etc all appear near the top of search results. They, and many others, take Open Source and Shareware and repackage it with trojans, spyware, malware and toolbars. Beware

This video gives you an idea

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From the perspective of someone who develops web applications - I think Open Source software has given a lot of novices access to be able to do a lot of stuff they couldn't have afforded to do before. Like setting up basic websites and blogs and the like. PHP Nuke, bulletin board software (like this forum uses) and other off-the-shelf download it and it just works kind of thing.

Except in my own experience, it rarely "just works".

If I buy something from Microsoft then I expect it to "just work" having paid for it. And invariably it does (though Visual Studio is still riddled with bugs, and the ASP.NET framework has me tearing my proverbial hair out sometimes after you've spent days trying to get something to work which ends up being a bug in the framework - but then it's a complex framework).

If I download something that's open source (Joomla, OpenCart, whatever) I expect it not to work. And that's normally what happens. Although these things are pitched at novices and do give great benefit, I'm amazed that people have the patience with them. Eventually I can work out why it doesn't work and make it work, but then I'd rather have just bought or built something that works in the first place and novices don't have the experience to see "why it doesn't work".

The idea of open source e-commerce software with "plug-ins" developed by "all and sundry" terrifies me given some of the code I've seen and the notion that once a vulnerability gets "into the wild" hundreds or thousands of e-com sites could then be hacked with scripts leading to massive data disclosure. Indeed some of the clients I pick up have been down that route before.

It's hardly problem-free but, in the main, MS Office "just works".

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If I download something that's open source (Joomla, OpenCart, whatever) I expect it not to work. And that's normally what happens. Although these things are pitched at novices and do give great benefit, I'm amazed that people have the patience with them. Eventually I can work out why it doesn't work and make it work, but then I'd rather have just bought or built something that works in the first place and novices don't have the experience to see "why it doesn't work".

What problems did you have with Joomla? It is not my favourite CMS but last time I used it it just worked. Customizing and templating is harder and not for naive users. Most of the mainstream CMS pretty much just work. Jahia, Wordpress, EE, Alfresco, Liferay are all pretty much click and install but developing on the platforms is much more complicated. I really don't see installing this kind of software as suitable for novices. What are the MS alternatives? Sharepoint? Well that is going to see you hiring $2000/day consultants to set up.

Seriously setting up a web server is at least semi skilled work. People who don't know what they are doing would be better using a managed cloud solution like Weebly.

The idea of open source e-commerce software with "plug-ins" developed by "all and sundry" terrifies me given some of the code I've seen and the notion that once a vulnerability gets "into the wild" hundreds or thousands of e-com sites could then be hacked with scripts leading to massive data disclosure. Indeed some of the clients I pick up have been down that route before.

Hmmm, have you seen the commercial paid for code? A lot written in Injah these days and of very poor quality. At least with OS code vulnerabilities tend to be patched pretty fast but you do have to keep on top of issues.

It's hardly problem-free but, in the main, MS Office "just works".

After 25 years it does but it used to crash a lot wiping out documents, books even. At one time it would randomly crash when your document got too big and trash the document and autosave in the process (Word 6.0 days). Same for Windows, it pretty much works now but it has taken a long time to get there.

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What problems did you have with Joomla? It is not my favourite CMS but last time I used it it just worked. Customizing and templating is harder and not for naive users. Most of the mainstream CMS pretty much just work. Jahia, Wordpress, EE, Alfresco, Liferay are all pretty much click and install but developing on the platforms is much more complicated. I really don't see installing this kind of software as suitable for novices. What are the MS alternatives? Sharepoint?

SharePoint - please, Dear God, no... :)

I found Wordpress worked nicely. Most of my stuff is "code" as opposed to design/content management.

I have visions of people installing "plug ins" and template sets which aren't quite compatible with whatever the CMS code base version is, directly into live websites, and breaking them in the process. And who do you call in an emergency? Er, nobody.

Reminds me of that superb IBM advert with the Head of Technology woman asking the question "whose job is it to make sure all this stuff works together?" and someone whispers in her ear "That would be.. yours".

Maybe there is a future for locally based consultants and agencies in IT after all.

Seriously setting up a web server is at least semi skilled work. People who don't know what they are doing would be better using a managed cloud solution like Weebly.

+1

Hmmm, have you seen the commercial paid for code? A lot written in Injah these days and of very poor quality. At least with OS code vulnerabilities tend to be patched pretty fast but you do have to keep on top of issues.

I think the key is having an accountable line of support for when stuff goes wrong. People like Microsoft have a far greater interest vested in not having everyone in the world abandoning their kit because it keeps being hacked into all the time. That's where Microsoft were right up until the launch of NT 4.0 when some really high profile issues (rendering the global.asa file as plain text in a browser if you called for it - anyone recall that?) placed them in a seriously threatened position, and they responded.

I suspect there's an aspect to this where I'm trying to defend my own fiefdom ;)

After 25 years it does but it used to crash a lot wiping out documents, books even. At one time it would randomly crash when your document got too big and trash the document and autosave in the process (Word 6.0 days). Same for Windows, it pretty much works now but it has taken a long time to get there.

I recall the days of constantly saving Word documents because the wretched thing would invariably crash at some point. Either that or Windows 95 would fall over completely.

I think this is where Google/Android is right now in terms of maturity.

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SharePoint - please, Dear God, no... :)

I found Wordpress worked nicely. Most of my stuff is "code" as opposed to design/content management.

And they have their "cloud" solution too.

I have visions of people installing "plug ins" and template sets which aren't quite compatible with whatever the CMS code base version is, directly into live websites, and breaking them in the process. And who do you call in an emergency? Er, nobody.

Ah yes that makes your earlier point, some are very low quality and can be security nightmares. While the core code can be good to excellent these are often the weak link. I was maybe a bit dismissive of your point but from experience plugins illustrate all of what you said.

It is true that Microsoft quality has improved a great deal since and starting from the XP sp1 days. There is definitely a place for commercial software.

In Joomla's case, and my memory is maybe hazy, didn't the developers have a fight, fork the code then one group did a big rewrite which left things in a poor state for years?

I think this is where Google/Android is right now in terms of maturity.

Android has shown that Linux can do desktops, the only thing that would be really cool would be the ability to print easily... it works on Linux.

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The standard Amazon web services Linux district runs Magento, OpenCart, Joomla, Wordpress and all the others after just a few yum installs of PHP MySQL and Apache. Pretty damn easy.

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The standard Amazon web services Linux district runs Magento, OpenCart, Joomla, Wordpress and all the others after just a few yum installs of PHP MySQL and Apache. Pretty damn easy.

You can also find images where all the "hard" work has already been done by someone else.

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