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History Of Council Housing In Liverpool

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Quite a fascinating history of the Liverpool council house.

http://municipaldrea...uses-in-europe/

Reveals the limitations of relying on private enterprise, the Council constantly hoped that private landlords would step in and build schemes, but they didn't so the Council was forced to build itself and innovate. Victorian Tories the unlikely hero's of such schemes.

victoria-square-3.jpg

The effect of trying to 'bring up' poor people (one of the orginal aims of council housing) was remarkable.

In one area of slums, it was said that 202 cases of criminal drunkenness in 1894 had been reduced to four in 1912 after clearance and rehousing: 'Wherever we go the Head Constable tells us his difficulties as regards crime are rapidly disappearing'.

Mr Turton concluded that so long as people needed to live near their work – particularly pressing in the casual employment black spot of Liverpool, 'it is as yet impossible to do what we would all like to do, namely, take these people into the outskirts'. That would be the project of the interwar years and the subject of a future post.

With the increasing casualisation of the work force, I have a suspicion that the 'Council House' will have to be re-evaluated and re-invented.

Edited by aSecureTenant

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http://www.geograph.org.uk/photo/2818378

First in manchester

Victoria Square, Oldham Road, Manchester

Built by Spalding & Cross for the Manchester Corporation in 1897, replacing slums, the first such housing project and still public housing. Quadrangular with a courtyard and greenery inside. Pevsner picks out the good brickwork, and the decorative touches such as the gables and terracotta details. Grade II listed.

Sadly, despite the architects' best efforts, Pevsner reports that "the initiative did not do the slum dwellers any good since they could not afford the rents and had to move to squalid conditions elsewhere."

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Pevsner reports that "the initiative did not do the slum dwellers any good since they could not afford the rents and had to move to squalid conditions elsewhere."

Seems to be a pattern that has emerged over time that market rents equilibrate at a level which is unaffordable to a significant percentage of the population.

Can't think why. ;)

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  • 406 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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