Jump to content
House Price Crash Forum

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

Wurzel Of Highbridge

Silk Road Siezed By The Feds

Recommended Posts

There are going to be a load of pissed off and angry under 25's around the next few weeks.

BitCoin Plunges Following US Government Seizure Of Silk Road Website, Dread Pirate Roberts In Custody

Earlier today, one of the most popular websites that use and promote the use of BitCoin, Silk Road, was shut down by the US government. As Reuters reports, U.S. law enforcement authorities raided an Internet site that served as a marketplace for illegal drugs, including heroin and cocaine, and arrested its owner, the Federal Bureau of Investigation said on Wednesday. The FBI arrested Ross William Ulbricht, known as "Dread Pirate Roberts," in San Francisco on Tuesday, according to court filings. Federal prosecutors charged Ulbricht with one count each of narcotics trafficking conspiracy, computer hacking conspiracy and money laundering conspiracy, according to a court filing.

....

"From in or about January 2011, up to and including September 2013, the Silk Road Hidden Website... has served as an online marketplace where illegal drugs and other illicit goods and services have been regularly bought and sold by the site's users," court papers filed in the Southern District of New York state.

I give it a month until another springs up, but this time run from somewhere like China.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There are going to be a load of pissed off and angry under 25's around the next few weeks.

BitCoin Plunges Following US Government Seizure Of Silk Road Website, Dread Pirate Roberts In Custody

I give it a month until another springs up, but this time run from somewhere like China.

There's already a few of them; Sheep Market Place, Black Market Reloaded and few Russian language ones too.

Silk Road was the most famous because Dread Pirate Roberts was an interesting character. The other market place owners keep a low profile (maybe that will help them avoid the same fate as DPR).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's interesting that they caught the guy using standard detective work - he didn't cover his tracks well enough. Bitcoin and Tor itself seemed to do a fine job though.

The 'war on drugs' is just a war on peaceful people. While I don't take drugs personally, criminalising the consumption of plant extracts is pretty nuts.

Ofc, some would consider it an illness. However, I don't see how locking people up can be considered a 'treatment' if that is the case. I certainly doubt they feel like they are being helped.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There's already a few of them; Sheep Market Place, Black Market Reloaded and few Russian language ones too.

Silk Road was the most famous because Dread Pirate Roberts was an interesting character. The other market place owners keep a low profile (maybe that will help them avoid the same fate as DPR).

Thanks for the HT, most useful place to visit around St.Patricks day (week). There is only so much alcohol one can stomach before major illness sets in.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm suprised they use Tor. Tor has immuniy from casual interception, but the nodes where Tor links to the rest of the Internet are the vulnerable points, and they are controlled by US intelligence - because Tor was designed by US Intelligence.

The idea behind Tor is not only to have multiple routes and IP addresses, but to lose the traffic in all the other traffic using Tor. That is why Tor is open for anyone to use - our traffic is chaff, to hide US government use of Tor amongst it. Us authorities can see what is going on in Tor any time they want.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's interesting that they caught the guy using standard detective work - he didn't cover his tracks well enough. Bitcoin and Tor itself seemed to do a fine job though.

No, they are comfortable disclosing the schoolboy errors that he made.

We don't know that Bitcoin and/or Tor did their job, because they have no reason to disclose if they didn't, given that the schoolboy errors are sufficient proof.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

No, they are comfortable disclosing the schoolboy errors that he made.

We don't know that Bitcoin and/or Tor did their job, because they have no reason to disclose if they didn't, given that the schoolboy errors are sufficient proof.

It took them several years and only after said schoolboy errors to catch him. It's not proof, but I've not seen evidence to suggest that Tor and/or Bitcoin have been compromised either.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It took them several years and only after said schoolboy errors to catch him. It's not proof, but I've not seen evidence to suggest that Tor and/or Bitcoin have been compromised either.

Yes it took several years.

We don't know that the schoolboy errors are what caught him.

There is apparently a simple attack that allows them to trace the IP of a Tor server, and from that they can issue subpoeanas and so on to the relevant hosts.

Also they already compromised a number of Tor servers a few months ago.

It suits them to disclose the schoolboy errors, it wouldn't suit them to disclose any technical details.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes it took several years.

We don't know that the schoolboy errors are what caught him.

There is apparently a simple attack that allows them to trace the IP of a Tor server, and from that they can issue subpoeanas and so on to the relevant hosts.

Also they already compromised a number of Tor servers a few months ago.

It suits them to disclose the schoolboy errors, it wouldn't suit them to disclose any technical details.

The schoolboy error he made was using an account on Bitcointalk to advertise Silk Road in January 2011 (only the second mention of Silk Road on the internet) and then using the same account to look for PHP developers in October 2011. The post in Oct 2011 had his personal email address in it. This made him a person of interest when the investigation into Silk Road began last year. The nail in his coffin happened this July when customs in Canada made the chance discovery of fake IDs being posted to his address in San Franciso. The FBI checked for records of Web Servers rented to people with the names in his fake IDs and the rest is history.

That's all documented in the court documents which are available online.

If Tor hidden services were no longer hidden why didn't the FBI shut it down after he made the second post in October 2011? Surely the post with his email address would have been enough to show that they found him through detective work instead of through compromising Tor.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's interesting that they caught the guy using standard detective work - he didn't cover his tracks well enough. Bitcoin and Tor itself seemed to do a fine job though.

The 'war on drugs' is just a war on peaceful people. While I don't take drugs personally, criminalising the consumption of plant extracts is pretty nuts.

Ofc, some would consider it an illness. However, I don't see how locking people up can be considered a 'treatment' if that is the case. I certainly doubt they feel like they are being helped.

Also my view. Legalise it and age-restrict it like alcohol and cigarettes. The government gets the revenue and you stop the illegal aspects, IIRC Portugal has gone some way to doing this.

I can't stand drugs myself but as an 18 year old can legally go out and buy and drink two bottles of whisky a day so anybody who wants to get completely out of their head and severely damage themselves in the process can already do so.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If Tor hidden services were no longer hidden why didn't the FBI shut it down after he made the second post in October 2011? Surely the post with his email address would have been enough to show that they found him through detective work instead of through compromising Tor.

Because Tor was designed and used for US Intelligence itself. It is used to make interception of US intelligence communications difficult. By opening Tor up to the public, the US intelligence traffic is buried in all the other public traffic, making it harder for other agencies to intercept.

But because the nodes of Tor are under US intelligence control, US intelligence can intercept it any time they want to. Tor also acts as a magnet for illicit traffic, no doubt making the nodes a convenient source of information for US intelligence.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Because Tor was designed and used for US Intelligence itself. It is used to make interception of US intelligence communications difficult. By opening Tor up to the public, the US intelligence traffic is buried in all the other public traffic, making it harder for other agencies to intercept

That bit is correct. The more traffic Tor handles the easier it is for a specific communication to go unnoticed.

But because the nodes of Tor are under US intelligence control, US intelligence can intercept it any time they want to. Tor also acts as a magnet for illicit traffic, no doubt making the nodes a convenient source of information for US intelligence.

This is incorrect. I've seen Tor nodes being set up in the past and none of them were controlled by the NSA! The NSA and GCHQ might control a significant minorty of all nodes but they'll never control all of them because anyone is free to set up their own node.

The Guardian released a leaked NSA presentation about Tor yesterday. This bit is interesting,

  • We will never be able to de-anonymize all Tor users all the time.

  • With manual analysis was can de-anonymize a very small fraction of Tor users, however no success in de-anonymizing a user in response to a TOPI request/on demand

NSA Tor Presentation

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • The Prime Minister stated that there were three Brexit options available to the UK:   224 members have voted

    1. 1. Which of the Prime Minister's options would you choose?


      • Leave with the negotiated deal
      • Remain
      • Leave with no deal

    Please sign in or register to vote in this poll. View topic


×

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.