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Saving For a Space Ship

Why Do So Many Americans Live In Mobile Homes?

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http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-24135022

Article..

Why do so many Americans live in mobile homes?

18% + of the population in some states live in mobile homes

Who lives in mobile homes

There are 8.5m homes and about 20m people

57% of household heads in full employment, 23% retired

Household income half the national average

In late 1990s, nearly 400,000 new manufactured homes sold a year, down to 55,000 now

70% of all new single family homes sold for under $125,000 are manufactured

Source: US Census, Manufactured Housing Institute

The Nimbys & landlords would probably go into lobbying overdrive to stop mobile home expansion in the Uk .

I think we need an examination of the possibilities of mobile & modular housing expansion. At least the land could be rented for 5 yrs for a temporary structure.

An acceptance that the economy is getting worse, not better would be a start....lower your sights

Edited by Saving For a Space Ship

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http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-24135022

Article..

Why do so many Americans live in mobile homes?

18% + of the population in some states live in mobile homes

The Nimbys & landlords would probably go into lobbying overdrive to stop mobile home expansion in the Uk .

I think we need an examination of the possibilities of mobile & modular housing expansion. At least the land could be rented for 5 yrs for a temporary structure.

An acceptance that the economy is getting worse, not better would be a start

Plenty of these around England's coastline, but they put a stop to permanent dwellings by enforced closures during the winter months, presumably the councils do not want to give people the chance of cheap accommodation or undermine resorts as a holiday destination.

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Plenty of these around England's coastline, but they put a stop to permanent dwellings by enforced closures during the winter months, presumably the councils do not want to give people the chance of cheap accommodation or undermine resorts as a holiday destination.

Also the problem with the park owners ripping off the tenants / trailer owners.

Such as allegedly charging high utility bills & forcing unfavourable buy back deals.

Perhaps owners co-op like resident ownership may be the answer

Retirement dreams shattered by property scam?

http://money.aol.co.uk/2013/06/13/retirement-dreams-shattered-by-property-scam/

I notice there is a new Mobile Homes Act 2013

http://www.gov.uk/park-mobile-homes/your-rights-and-obligations

From the article it appears some wealthier owners have money to rent / buy land or start a residents org.

"Not everyone who lives in a trailer park is poor," says Charles Becker, a professor of economics at Duke University, and one of a handful of academics nationwide who has extensively studied the subject.

"And there are parts of the country, like Michigan, where living in a mobile home community doesn't have the stigma it does in the south. You also have retirement communities in Florida where people aren't poor at all."

Edited by Saving For a Space Ship

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Guest eight

Plenty of these around England's coastline, but they put a stop to permanent dwellings by enforced closures during the winter months, presumably the councils do not want to give people the chance of cheap accommodation or undermine resorts as a holiday destination.

They're also not cheap by any stretch of the imagination. I think most of them come in at about 95% of the cost of a "normal" house.

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They're also not cheap by any stretch of the imagination. I think most of them come in at about 95% of the cost of a "normal" house.

Used ones start at £2000 +, but I'm not sure if that includes some rip-off tie in deal to the park land owner that lowers the price

http://www.ebay.co.uk/sch/i.html?_from=R40&_nkw=static+caravan&_in_kw=1&_ex_kw=decking&_sacat=0&_okw=&_oexkw=&_adv=1&_mPrRngCbx=1&_udlo=2%2C000&_udhi=&LH_BIN=1&_ftrt=901&_ftrv=1&_sabdlo=&_sabdhi=&_samilow=&_samihi=&_sadis=200&_fpos=&LH_SubLocation=1&_fsradio2=%26LH_PrefLoc%3D1&_sargn=-1%26saslc%3D1&_salic=3&_saact=3&LH_SALE_CURRENCY=0&_sop=15&_dmd=1&_ipg=50

Is it possible to buy 2 in different areas to get around part time living rule ?, I imagine they've sussed that.

Perhaps live in it in winter & buy a cheap camper van to tour in the summer. Could you use the vacant mobile for storage ?

Edited by Saving For a Space Ship

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Used ones start at £2000 +, but I'm not sure if that includes some rip-off tie in deal to the park land owner that lowers the price

http://www.ebay.co.uk/sch/i.html?_from=R40&_nkw=static+caravan&_in_kw=1&_ex_kw=decking&_sacat=0&_okw=&_oexkw=&_adv=1&_mPrRngCbx=1&_udlo=2%2C000&_udhi=&LH_BIN=1&_ftrt=901&_ftrv=1&_sabdlo=&_sabdhi=&_samilow=&_samihi=&_sadis=200&_fpos=&LH_SubLocation=1&_fsradio2=%26LH_PrefLoc%3D1&_sargn=-1%26saslc%3D1&_salic=3&_saact=3&LH_SALE_CURRENCY=0&_sop=15&_dmd=1&_ipg=50

Is it possible to buy 2 in different areas to get around part time living rule ?, I imagine they've sussed that.

Perhaps live in it in winter & buy a cheap camper van to tour in the summer. Could you use the vacant mobile for storage ?

One of my relations tends to go to Benidorm for the month/2 months he cant be in.Its to do with the council tax more than anything I think.

It does make things difficult though and of course more so for anyone not retired.

Most of the park owners are the worst kind of rentier though.My brothers partner had a one and when she wanted to sell she had no choice but to sell to the park owner for around £800 for a £6000 home.That was until I "convinced" the park owner it would be in his best interest to allow us to take the home away.He did .

Its a minefield though but would have huge potential as some form of co-op,

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About 5 years ago I went camping near Arundel. There were people (not gypsies) who lived in caravans (not luxury) all year round.

They were all retired and said it was a wonderful life and wished that they had done all year round as it is so much cheaper and easier. They even had strawberry and tomato plants growing outside their caravans.

Personally it looked an awful life no space and cold.

Edited by iamnumerate

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About 5 years ago I went camping near Arundel. There were people (not gypsies) who lived in caravans (not luxury) all year round.

They were all retired and said it was a wonderful life and wished that they had done all year round as it is so much cheaper and easier. They even had strawberry and tomato plants growing outside their caravans.

Personally it looked an awful life no space and cold.

Tend to get extremes in statics.....it can be very hot even in the autumn and spring during the day with solar heat from the large windows, but the temperature drops like a stone at night.

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Vested interests in the UK do everything they can to keep people in the bricks 'n' mortar mortgage trap. It's not in anybody's interest to provide cheap living accommodation for ordinary people. However, if someone could work out a way of creating a bubble in caravan prices, I am sure it would be done...after all, it worked with beach huts!

If you really want to live out of the mortgage/rent trap, you have to do it on your own - either as a wild camper (in Scotland) or as a continuous cruiser on British Waterways; or set up a caravan yourself discretely on someone's private land and pay rent to them (though you will need to prove to council tax snoopers that you are not living as a separate household). Alternatively, as someone pointed out, you could live in a holiday camp for 9-10 months of the year then spend the winter abroad somewhere warm and cheap, though this only works if you are retired or can fit your work round it.

Edited by Austin Allegro

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Vested interests in the UK do everything they can to keep people in the bricks 'n' mortar mortgage trap. It's not in anybody's interest to provide cheap living accommodation for ordinary people. However, if someone could work out a way of creating a bubble in caravan prices, I am sure it would be done...after all, it worked with beach huts!

I suspect you are right, its all about equity preservation and preservation of bank's balance sheets. A cheap solution to housing will not be tolerated.

Strict planning controls on types of dwellings and the numbers built plays nicely into the hand of the establishment and most of the population who have sold their souls to bricks and mortar.

Edited by crashmonitor

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Tend to get extremes in statics.....it can be very hot even in the autumn and spring during the day with solar heat from the large windows, but the temperature drops like a stone at night.

The people said it was easy to keep warm as it heats up quicker than house. - I found it very hard to believe.

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Lived for five years in East London in converted shipping containers. That was all on temporary structures permissions from Tower Hamlets. Lovely views of the Dome and Canary Wharf!

Might look for my own quasi commercial land and build my own container city. Potential work/live units, combined with temporary planning might be a workaround.

Edited by aSecureTenant

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They're also not cheap by any stretch of the imagination. I think most of them come in at about 95% of the cost of a "normal" house.

Take a look at this:

http://www.rightmove.co.uk/property-for-sale/property-25162461.html

Not bad for £27,950 and just 10 miles or so outside of Cardiff.

I know this area well and know someone who lives there. Its a really nice little set up with its own pub and swimming pool. You have to be out for 2 months in the winter and there is the remote possibility that the Severn Barrage will be built there. But I've certainly considered it.

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Lived for five years in East London in converted shipping containers. That was all on temporary structures permissions from Tower Hamlets. Lovely views of the Dome and Canary Wharf!

Might look for my own quasi commercial land and build my own container city. Potential work/live units, combined with temporary planning might be a workaround.

I've been a long term fan of shipping container living. I wondered why the designers do not seem to insulate them on the outside often ?

They are more secure than mobile homes. Putting containers on wheels may solve some planning issues

Mobile homes could also do with extra insulation cladding.

Renting a long empty small commercial unit & living in a mobile home inside, surrounded by a false wall (sometimes disguised as a storage unit) is a popular choice, particularly among east european immigrants around here in NW

Edited by Saving For a Space Ship

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I think the simple answer is because they can. I can't imagine they're much fun to live in though the middle of winter in north of the country or in the middle of summer in the south.

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A 'caravan' as defined by the law, as long as it can be moved in no more than two sections, can now have an overall interior space of 65x23ft, nearly 1500ft2. (or bigger than about 99% of newbuilds!) They dont even have to look like caravans.

http://www.ecomobilehomes.com/

ie

http://www.ecomobile...portfolio/1237/

Oh don't be silly we can't have people just parking these things anywhere. Think of the countryside! :lol:

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They still have to be connected to water, sewerage and electricity mains, and preferably mains gas.*

As these utilities have to be provided anyway, you're better off putting up properly insulated modular homes, rather than flimsier structures such as mobile homes.

*You can use bottled gas (or oil if the site has enough room for the storage tank and its rules allow it), but they're expensive.

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A 'caravan' as defined by the law, as long as it can be moved in no more than two sections, can now have an overall interior space of 65x23ft, nearly 1500ft2. (or bigger than about 99% of newbuilds!) They dont even have to look like caravans.

One of my neighbours couldn't get planning permission to extend a tiny 2-bed house on his 9-acre plot. He gave up fighting the planners through the normal process by adding a single-story extension within the legal definition of a caravan (looks nothing like one). It is built up on blocks, technically moveable and can be transported under a motorway bridge. The council issued an enforcement notice, got nowhere with the action and then gave up.

I recently found out another neighbour with a single-story outbuilding and has built a 2-story house concealed underneath it! (part buried obviously). They are using it as pension income.

As for mobile home living, there are loads in this area with foreign temporary (ha!) workers in. Most have external insulation fitted, porches etc. to make them usable all year round.

There are lots of ways around planning and only a handful of violations ever get enforced nationwide each year.

I've now found enough ways to legally add 1800sqft of living space without planning permission. Start learning the law, not what the bl00dy planners tell you.

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One of my neighbours couldn't get planning permission to extend a tiny 2-bed house on his 9-acre plot. He gave up fighting the planners through the normal process by adding a single-story extension within the legal definition of a caravan (looks nothing like one). It is built up on blocks, technically moveable and can be transported under a motorway bridge. The council issued an enforcement notice, got nowhere with the action and then gave up.

I recently found out another neighbour with a single-story outbuilding and has built a 2-story house concealed underneath it! (part buried obviously). They are using it as pension income.

As for mobile home living, there are loads in this area with foreign temporary (ha!) workers in. Most have external insulation fitted, porches etc. to make them usable all year round.

There are lots of ways around planning and only a handful of violations ever get enforced nationwide each year.

I've now found enough ways to legally add 1800sqft of living space without planning permission. Start learning the law, not what the bl00dy planners tell you.

Apparently you can have one and occupy it for 28 days without planning permission. So just buy 10 or move one 3 feet every 28 days!

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I recently found out another neighbour with a single-story outbuilding and has built a 2-story house concealed underneath it! (part buried obviously). They are using it as pension income.

Be careful with that, I''m currently working with a drone company and one of their services is leasing drones to LAs with infrared cameras to detect concealed dwellings.

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In answer to the OP's question, there is another reason, which of course the BBC article doesn't mention: less regulation. Under most city and county ordinances, trailer parks don't count as residential developments and thus don't have to be 'zoned' (i.e. have planning permission) for residential use. While there have been attempts to change this in some cities and counties over the years, they meet organised resistance both from trailer park owners' representatives and civil liberties campaigners, and in some cases the change would need to be made at the level of state legislation.

A large trailer park recently opened on the San Bernardino/Redlands border, the local fuss over which would make the one over the gippo camp in Essex a couple of years ago look like a storm in a teacup. But ultimately, local politicians in both cities were powerless to stop it from going ahead.

Also, in this part of the country at least, the hot and dry climate means that buildings don't have to be as weatherproof and robust as they do in most of Europe, meaning that trailers and prefabs last longer. It's not uncommon to see developments of prefab houses from the '50s and '60s, still in perfectly good repair.

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