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Divorce, The House And House Prices


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I would like to add a balancing anecdotal to this thread. It does happen to both sexes, I have a friend who married a little later on in life. She came into the marriage owning her quite desirable home outright and lost it when he divorced her a few years later - ended up living some sort of council bedsit, it utterly broke her.

There are also examples of female friends who have walked away from marriages and taken nothing either because the divorce was amicable both parties were financially secure in their own right, or else (sadly) because the wife is frightened of the ex and what he may do to the children if asked to pay any maintenance (having already made sure he has the house and her car) :(

There are always exceptions that prove the rule. And like it or not, the dice are massively weighted against the male in UK courts. For every story like yours - and I feel for your friend with 100% sympathy - there are a hundred men in the same position.

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'Baby, this relationship is so good we have to get the government involved'

Its not like people don't know this before getting married.. If you're not willing to gamble all your money, you shouldn't really be in the casino.

-Disclaimer- I certainly don't think the current situation is correct, but its not like information about it is difficult to find out.

Not that simple. Marriage does make sense for many reasons - for a start, many countries do not recognise co-habitation for immigration and visa purposes. That said, if you are in the UK and not going to relocate, then there is little benefit.

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There are always exceptions that prove the rule. And like it or not, the dice are massively weighted against the male in UK courts. For every story like yours - and I feel for your friend with 100% sympathy - there are a hundred men in the same position.

I wonder if that's really true or not - we all hear about the disputed ones where the divorce has happened a midst massive rancor and bitterness but not the quiet ones. Lots of people seem to come to amicable arrangements where neither party feels badly aggrieved and both just get on with their lives. It isn't a legal requirement for the courts to get involved in the splitting of assets on divorce.

I guess as another poster said, most people should think longer and harder before embarking on a marriage in the first place.

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I wonder if that's really true or not - we all hear about the disputed ones where the divorce has happened a midst massive rancor and bitterness but not the quiet ones. Lots of people seem to come to amicable arrangements where neither party feels badly aggrieved and both just get on with their lives. It isn't a legal requirement for the courts to get involved in the splitting of assets on divorce.

I guess as another poster said, most people should think longer and harder before embarking on a marriage in the first place.

Hellsbells check out suicide rates after divorce. I seem to remember suicide rates amongst divorced men were higher than any other group.

I'm currently really worried about a lovely guy who has been gutted when his wife decided to end the marriage because of issues she has to work through. He's not replying to texts. Such a lovely bloke., I just hope he's ok. :(

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I would like to add a balancing anecdotal to this thread. It does happen to both sexes, I have a friend who married a little later on in life. She came into the marriage owning her quite desirable home outright and lost it when he divorced her a few years later - ended up living some sort of council bedsit, it utterly broke her.

There are also examples of female friends who have walked away from marriages and taken nothing either because the divorce was amicable both parties were financially secure in their own right, or else (sadly) because the wife is frightened of the ex and what he may do to the children if asked to pay any maintenance (having already made sure he has the house and her car) :(

How to start with a nice home and end with nothing...

A tale.

They married each other after both had divorced previous spouses.

He bought a mortgaged, large home to the new marriage, the deeds in his name.

She bought her pretty cottage to the marriage - mortgage free.

She was encouraged to sell the cottage. The proceeds would extend and renovate 'his' house - their new married home.

Over a few years all her money was spent on 'their' house.

Neither she ( a reserved, even timid type) nor he raised the subject of the deeds being in his name only. Mirror Wills were made.

She became seriously ill. Long term hospitalised.

He had affairs. Accessed the remaining bit of savings that she had under her own name.

She died.

Her grown up children (who were close to her) got nothing. There was nothing left.

Just a large extended renovated £600K house - with the deeds in his name.

Edited by juvenal
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I would like to add a balancing anecdotal to this thread. It does happen to both sexes, I have a friend who married a little later on in life. She came into the marriage owning her quite desirable home outright and lost it when he divorced her a few years later - ended up living some sort of council bedsit, it utterly broke her.

There are also examples of female friends who have walked away from marriages and taken nothing either because the divorce was amicable both parties were financially secure in their own right, or else (sadly) because the wife is frightened of the ex and what he may do to the children if asked to pay any maintenance (having already made sure he has the house and her car) :(

Awful in all cases.

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250k seems to be the going rate for a 40+ yrs old man to get divorced with some assets including a house!

That's about what it cost me and I had "custody" of our two children. (plus pension rights of course)

Jaw dropping.

It is frightening that there are people out there doing this. More frightening that there appears so many.

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They CAN ignore it - but in reality i think they nearly always do not.

Main reason is it probably makes their job a lot easier for a start.

Also you can have a legally binding contract in the UK (correct me if i am wrong) based on only a verbal agreement.

So a judge ignoring a prenup would have to have a pretty serious reason to do so.

There must be some stats out there on how many of these are accepted once a divorce happens.

Worth doing either way. Having something written down in black and white that was agreed by both parties - is never going to be a bad thing to take to a divorce hearing . . .

It's probably more complicated than that. Some suggest post-nups every 6-7 years, to show both still agree to the arrangement. I'm just suggesting some £250 pre-nup they can't be fully relied upon, not enough English caselaw, although that German heiress won in London courts a few years ago, relying on her prenup.

It is recommended that pre-nuptial and post-nuptial agreements should only last until the birth of the first child of the family or for up to a period of five years. Whilst pre-nuptial and post-nuptial agreements can be prepared to provide for the birth of children or to last for longer periods, they will have a reduced chance of being upheld by the court on divorce in their entirety.

http://www.pannone.com/solicitors-for-you/family-law/pre-nuptial-agreements

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Something that costs £250 and even could save you £250k sounds like a no brainer to me.

The reviews do make sense actually. You wouldn't get a rental agreement or a business>supplier agreement for 20-30 years and expect it to be relevant and agreed upon for the entire time. Regular reviews sound like common sense.

And i suppose in the case of a pre-nup probably give you a forewarning of changes in attitude and potential plans . .

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Anecdotally I have heard cases of men who are getting divorced who make their wives a reasonable offer of settlement, with the proviso that if she refuses it and goes to law, he will fight it until all the money is gone in legal costs. It's potentially a scorched earth policy obviously, but it would be interesting to see if the tactic works.

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Anecdotally I have heard cases of men who are getting divorced who make their wives a reasonable offer of settlement, with the proviso that if she refuses it and goes to law, he will fight it until all the money is gone in legal costs. It's potentially a scorched earth policy obviously, but it would be interesting to see if the tactic works.

Risky but perhaps worth it if you think you are going to be taken to the cleaners.

Ultimately, if one party loses then they could be held reponsible for all the legal costs AND still have to hand over half the house, pensions, whatever. Then again, if there is no money left then it turns out to be a hollow victory. The other person owing the money could simply buy a plane ticket.

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Ok CCC, I agree, if she/he will sign if with freewill ect, and if they don't pull all the 'You can't love me enough if you want this.'

Anecdotally I have heard cases of men who are getting divorced who make their wives a reasonable offer of settlement, with the proviso that if she refuses it and goes to law, he will fight it until all the money is gone in legal costs. It's potentially a scorched earth policy obviously, but it would be interesting to see if the tactic works.

Didn't work in this case, or at least didn't seem to. Maybe it did for he probably still has big earning years ahead. What price the satisfaction in full-on nasty divorce, even if it comes at loss of almost all the assets for both parties? And both husband and wife were solicitors.

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2205521/Divorcing-solicitors-lose-fortune-fighting-3-2m-home--lawyers-make-mint.html

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Won't work for the male because the courts look at your earning potential and 'tax' it based on what you 'should' earn. It's designed to stop a high earner becoming a gardener for a year whilst fighting a divorce and claiming that is his income.

Of course, what it means is that the effective tax rate can go up to near 100% if you slip backwards on the income pole - maybe because your skill set is no longer in demand.....

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Won't work for the male because the courts look at your earning potential and 'tax' it based on what you 'should' earn. It's designed to stop a high earner becoming a gardener for a year whilst fighting a divorce and claiming that is his income.

Of course, what it means is that the effective tax rate can go up to near 100% if you slip backwards on the income pole - maybe because your skill set is no longer in demand.....

I believe the standard solution is to start a company, remarry, give your new wife a directorship and pay her your wages, not much the courts can do about this. alternatively just go self employed and do cash only work.

I am told if a ex-wife phones the CSA, one of the first questions they ask is "is your ex partner a company director or self employed" if the answer is yes, they more or less admit there is little they can do- its that common

I took the third way, get into a relationship with someone who earns substantially more than yourself, at least i know she is not after what little i have left...

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I am told if a ex-wife phones the CSA, one of the first questions they ask is "is your ex partner a company director or self employed" if the answer is yes, they more or less admit there is little they can do- its that common

I knew a woman whose ex was like the above - she got very little from him finanically but then she had driven him almost nuts with her own nuttiness.

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  • 433 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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