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The Preacherman

Gen Y Vs Baby Boomers

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Here's the American take on Gen Y and their Baby Boomer parents.

1st up Gen Y and their unrealistic aspirations:

Why Generation Y Yuppies Are Unhappy

Say hi to Lucy.

Lucy is part of Generation Y, the generation born between the late 1970s and the mid 1990s. She's also part of a yuppie culture that makes up a large portion of Gen Y.

I have a term for yuppies in the Gen Y age group -- I call them Gen Y Protagonists & Special Yuppies, or GYPSYs. A GYPSY is a unique brand of yuppie, one who thinks they are the main character of a very special story.

So Lucy's enjoying her GYPSY life, and she's very pleased to be Lucy. Only issue is this one thing:

Lucy's kind of unhappy.

To get to the bottom of why, we need to define what makes someone happy or unhappy in the first place. It comes down to a simple formula:2013-09-15-Geny2.jpg

It's pretty straightforward -- when the reality of someone's life is better than they had expected, they're happy. When reality turns out to be worse than the expectations, they're unhappy.

http://www.huffingto..._b_3930620.html

And then the response from the Gen Yer.

F**** You. I'm Gen Y, and I Don't Feel Special or Entitled, Just Poor.

A bunch of you people on Facebook and Twitter keep sharing a Huff Po stick-figure thing about how Gen Y is unhappy because they're unrealistic delusional ingrates.

You know, this thing.

If you wrote that, or you liked that, carefully consider these thoughts:

1) These are weirdly contrived generational categories, too weird for such black-and-white reasoning. I've always thought myself more tail-end-of-Gen-X in temperament, age, and outlook. But '77-'79 is a sociologically ambiguous no-man's land, and we typically get lumped in with the millennials, especially when it comes to money matters.

2) Go f**k yourselves.

You have no idea about student debt, underemployment, life-long renting. "Stop feeling special" is some shitty advice. I don't feel special or entitled, just poor. The only thing that makes me special is I have more ballooning debt than you. I've tempered the hell out of my expectations of work, and I've exceeded those expectations crazily to have one interesting, exciting damned career that's culminated in some leadership roles for national publications. And I'm still poor and in debt and worked beyond the point where it can be managed with my health and my desire to actually see the son I'm helping to raise.

http://aweinstein.ki...titl-1333588443

As a clear Gen Xer I can see both sides. Gen Ys are whiney and show a strong sense of entitlement. However, they were bought up that way by their boomer parents who sold them a lie that by simply going to university and believing they were important they would become a big success. Meanwhile the same parents are blocking their offspring's career and social aspirations, particularly of course owning a home.

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My advice to everybody is to walk away from this thread. It is impossible for the generations to communicate with one another in a meaningful way. All it will do is raise blood pressures.

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My advice to everybody is to walk away from this thread. It is impossible for the generations to communicate with one another in a meaningful way. All it will do is raise blood pressures.

Typical boomer, it's all your fault!

...i'm joking of course :)

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My advice to everybody is to walk away from this thread. It is impossible for the generations to communicate with one another in a meaningful way. All it will do is raise blood pressures.

The victory of experience over hope at last Dorkins.

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Saw this tweet which goes some way to illustrating one of the problems here. People struggling to see the reality for others.

James Mackintosh (@jmackin2) tweeted at 5:38 pm on Fri, Sep 13, 2013:

In each income group the biggest proportion thinks their income level is middle class MT @justinwolfers: http://t.co/95P5kPscwP

(

)

(I'm not 100% on the numbers but you get the idea.)

Edited by 7 Year Itch

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Another attempt at divide and rule. While different generations are fighting over scraps, the 1% are laughing all the way to the bank.

I don't see much difference between generation Y and my own (Gen X) when we were their age - poor, vaguely optimistic and hard working when given the chance but slowly realising how it really works.

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The risk/eventuality is that the GYs will feel justified in ransacking savings, pensions, assets etc. in 10 years when they control political power.

Agreed - that's a definite risk if the powers that be continue to push this current narrative.

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Another attempt at divide and rule. While different generations are fighting over scraps, the 1% are laughing all the way to the bank.

I don't see much difference between generation Y and my own (Gen X) when we were their age - poor, vaguely optimistic and hard working when given the chance but slowly realising how it really works.

The difference is Gen Y are working hard and often more switched on but then not being well rewarded for their efforts as Gen X and boomers are blocking their way. Also Gen Y have considerable student debts.

Edited by Silent Dancer

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The difference is Gen Y are working hard and often more switched on but then not being well rewarded for their efforts as Gen X and boomers are blocking their way. Also Gen Y have considerable student debts.

Yes, and working hard, being more switched on and not being rewarded for their efforts is something that no young person ever felt before? I dunno that kind of describes how I and many of my peers felt in my 20s. Similarly, waiting for the older guys to retire/die/move to a new job so you could take theirs? Sounds kind of familiar too. cf Jacques Statements in this book:

http://podgorny.cz/~radek/mess/Ian%20Rowlands-Full%20Facts%20Book%20of%20Cold%20Reading.pdf

There's also demographic considerations. There's a lot more olds than previously - and more of them are feeling fitter and having to work longer than before. Hence, it'll likely take longer to empty those positions they occupy - and that's if technology doesn't scrap the need for them to be replaced.

I've no idea if the entitlement meme is appropriate to apply to Gen Y. It's not been my experience, but the struggling writer/blogger is playing into the hands of the original article writer. A few rare exceptions aside, writing has never paid well - and the new technology removes the barrier to entry near completely - hence so many wanting to do it.

I agree on the debt front. Higher education is a bubble and I'd argue a waste of time for many. The costs are basically usury for normal people. Doubly bad because they've grown up during a time of plenty and a reasonable expectation they'd be able to clear any debts due to a booming jobs market which no longer exists.

Equally, there's no doubt it's hard to get a foot hold if you are just getting started in this depression (and even more insidious because the powers that be are denying there is one and hammering welfare). I missed much of the 80s recessions (although my Dad was unemployed a few times during it). But people slightly older than me often experienced long periods of unemployment just as they were starting out. Some never recovered from it - and a few became the multi-generational unemployed.

Because of this, I do think there is something to the Gen X need for security problem - which again might leave jobs occupied for longer whereas previously they might have been more likely to change career, set up on their own business or even retire early in their middle age. Plus they have hefty mortgages to pay for.

Similarly, living costs, especially housing, for the young - compared to their incomes have no doubt always felt high, but they are at frankly soul crushingly stupid levels now.

Finally, due to globalisation and technology, I think there's more a winner takes all to business and entrepreneurship than previously. Whereas previous entrepreneurs might have been happy with a local business, now the obligation or necessity is to take it global. Lots of opportunities exist, but each one might not provide a lifetime's employment. Plus the new enterprises are creating fewer jobs.

Will Gen Y eventually do OK? Maybe - but they are facing something of a perfect storm of the normal crises faced by every young person, plus a depression, fast approaching tipping points in technology and bubbles in housing and education costs.

Or perhaps I'm an old git who doesn't get it. :D

Edited by StainlessSteelCat

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Guest eight

Or perhaps I'm an old git who doesn't get it. :D

On the contrary, I thought it was a very balanced summary.

Access to capital is another big one. Very hard to get ahead without the means to accumulate some savings. Or you get situations like that quoted on another thread where somebody had to borrow three quarters of a mil to open a coffee shop..... in Newark.

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The other burden of generation Y and beyond in the west is poor education, again not their fault, but their education was generally post internet and modular, all about knowledge and nothing about understanding (knowledge which is immediately forgotten). This is the main thing separating them from generation X, in that they are largely unemployable. Whereas gen X are generally in well paid jobs but asset poor and struggling to fund the whole thing. Almost all new employees in science and tech companies who are under 40 are from eastern Europe, the middle east, far east and India and some Mediterranean countries, none from the UK and the US.

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The other burden of generation Y and beyond in the west is poor education, again not their fault, but their education was generally post internet and modular, all about knowledge and nothing about understanding (knowledge which is immediately forgotten). This is the main thing separating them from generation X, in that they are largely unemployable. Whereas gen X are generally in well paid jobs but asset poor and struggling to fund the whole thing. Almost all new employees in science and tech companies who are under 40 are from eastern Europe, the middle east, far east and India and some Mediterranean countries, none from the UK and the US.

Link? Sounds like BS to me.

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Link? Sounds like BS to me.

and not for the first time.

Back to the original quote:

But '77-'79 is a sociologically ambiguous no-man's land

This is so spot on it's scary. I know generations are defined differently in America, however I'm in this bracket and always thought I was the fag end of gen x. Whichever classification that era is, it's definitely a generational limbo.

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This is so spot on it's scary. I know generations are defined differently in America, however I'm in this bracket and always thought I was the fag end of gen x. Whichever classification that era is, it's definitely a generational limbo.

As an '81 baby I always thought there was a massive cultural and educational gulf somewhere between the young people of my age and those of my sister's '85 cohort (on the educational front especially I always felt very lucky, even at the time, of seeming to benefit from a kind of 'last days' before the barbarians sacked Rome). Having spent longer than usual in the higher education system, I am now definitely lumped in with the young 'uns on the career/financial front and my peers who left school at 16 to start a family, get a relatively undemanding job and take out a mortgage on a small home are experiencing a very different outlook. Nothing to do with the inherent validity of those choices per se; everything to do with timing.

To relate back to the original topic, I feel that any anger among a disillusioned generation may not be so much that realities don't meet magic sparkly expectations, but that choices specifically sold as being prudent ones have been subsequently re-engineered to be imprudent ones by an older generation looking after their own backs (and more infuriatingly doing it with the truly heartfelt self-justification that this, the pillaged wealth of the young's future, is what they deserve as they promised the money to themselves in the past and it's got to come from somewhere). Thus you have the younger part of 'generation X' and the older part of 'generation Y' split into two camps: those who acted 'imprudently' and were rewarded for it finding common ground with their elders; those who seemed to do everything right and were punished for it ending up in the same boat as their juniors (and I really wouldn't want to eighteen today).

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and not for the first time.

Back to the original quote:

This is so spot on it's scary. I know generations are defined differently in America, however I'm in this bracket and always thought I was the fag end of gen x. Whichever classification that era is, it's definitely a generational limbo.

I hit my teens just as Blondie were making it big in the charts so I guess I'm Generation RSI.

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I am a mid 70's child so maybe just off the GenY group. Met my wife at 18.

Up to 20

With hard work we can make a good life for ourselves.

20-25

No matter how hard I work the next tier job roles are closed (Working overtime for free recommended).

25-30

System is who you know not how good you are, fk this I am going contract.

30-Present

Buy large flat, good area, pay off by 42. Kick back 3 day a week and live.

The chance of a good life through the dream of a terraced house, kids, and a fat pension is an unattainable lie. Once you get over this who is going to buy the £300k terraces?

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choices specifically sold as being prudent ones have been subsequently re-engineered to be imprudent ones by an older generation looking after their own backs (and more infuriatingly doing it with the truly heartfelt self-justification that this, the pillaged wealth of the young's future, is what they deserve as they promised the money to themselves in the past and it's got to come from somewhere). Thus you have the younger part of 'generation X' and the older part of 'generation Y' split into two camps: those who acted 'imprudently' and were rewarded for it finding common ground with their elders; those who seemed to do everything right and were punished for it ending up in the same boat as their juniors

Nicely put. It is difficult to put across where the injustices lie when people naturally side with their own generation, thank you i've been trying hard to say the same myself but never found the words.

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To my mind the generational thing is a distraction. What we have is economic policy engineered to favour the holders of capital over the providers of labour. Great if you hold significant capital ****** you if you don't.

It's no way to run things if you want innovation and the real growth and development that comes from that. But if you don't care about that it's a great way of maintaing the power base of those who are in a position to benefit from the cockeyed policy, who also happen to be the people who can pull the strings to make shit this way.

This is the normal human condition. Genuine social mobility is a rare event caused by circumstances that overwhelm the vested interests ability to maintain the status quo.

Edit: for typo's, i'm posting drunk :)

Edited by SpectrumFX

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My advice to everybody is to walk away from this thread. It is impossible for the generations to communicate with one another in a meaningful way. All it will do is raise blood pressures.

People should ask themselves who is behind inter generational conflict and why are they doing it.

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Indeed it's interesting to ask why the post-war generation apparently had it so good. I'd suggest Governments that were afraid of a population who were used to fighting and also one that was probably smaller than before the war so labour could command a higher price.

By the 70s, they probably felt they could start reversing some of the gains - and that's been the prevailing narrative for the last few decades.

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It's even worse in other European countries for the young with absolutely massive unemployment in Spain and Greece.

At some point a country is going to offer some young people friendly policies and hoover up all the young workforce from Europe.

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. I'd suggest Governments that were afraid of a population who were used to fighting

Interesting. I was born in WW2, all my generation and those older than us did National Service and were taught how to fight.

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The other burden of generation Y and beyond in the west is poor education, again not their fault, but their education was generally post internet and modular, all about knowledge and nothing about understanding (knowledge which is immediately forgotten). This is the main thing separating them from generation X, in that they are largely unemployable. Whereas gen X are generally in well paid jobs but asset poor and struggling to fund the whole thing. Almost all new employees in science and tech companies who are under 40 are from eastern Europe, the middle east, far east and India and some Mediterranean countries, none from the UK and the US.

Sorry, but as someone who's done a fair bit of recruitment for a science-based company, that is completely untrue. There's a glut of high-quality graduates from the UK out there.

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As an '81 baby I always thought there was a massive cultural and educational gulf somewhere between the young people of my age and those of my sister's '85 cohort (on the educational front especially I always felt very lucky, even at the time, of seeming to benefit from a kind of 'last days' before the barbarians sacked Rome). Having spent longer than usual in the higher education system, I am now definitely lumped in with the young 'uns on the career/financial front and my peers who left school at 16 to start a family, get a relatively undemanding job and take out a mortgage on a small home are experiencing a very different outlook. Nothing to do with the inherent validity of those choices per se; everything to do with timing.

To relate back to the original topic, I feel that any anger among a disillusioned generation may not be so much that realities don't meet magic sparkly expectations, but that choices specifically sold as being prudent ones have been subsequently re-engineered to be imprudent ones by an older generation looking after their own backs (and more infuriatingly doing it with the truly heartfelt self-justification that this, the pillaged wealth of the young's future, is what they deserve as they promised the money to themselves in the past and it's got to come from somewhere). Thus you have the younger part of 'generation X' and the older part of 'generation Y' split into two camps: those who acted 'imprudently' and were rewarded for it finding common ground with their elders; those who seemed to do everything right and were punished for it ending up in the same boat as their juniors (and I really wouldn't want to eighteen today).

Good post.

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