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Stagecoach 12% Finders Fee For Returning A Wallet + Admin Costs

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http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2418619/Bus-company-takes-12-PER-CENT-cut-money-inside-disabled-passenger-s-wallet-left-seat.html

A disabled man was asked to pay £30 to retrieve his lost wallet from a bus company.

Arthur Adlam, 31, had just drawn his disability allowance and had around £225 in his wallet when he accidentally left it behind on the bus.

..

But staff at the bus station told him it was company policy to take a 12 per cent cut plus a 50p 'admin fee' - a total of £27.50 - just to get it back.

..

A Stagecoach spokesman said: 'A local policy is in place in West Fife to charge a "finder fee" for the monies claimed from our lost property, with the fee going to the driver, or member of the public who has handed in any such items to us.

And the 50p admin goes where exactly?

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This sounds like theft...The Police should be called.

What would the police do? Probably write it off as an unsolvable crime.:rolleyes:

They'd be hard put to it to make a judgement on whose fault it was....:o

Not bright, our Plod!:lol:

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What would the police do? Probably write it off as an unsolvable crime.:rolleyes:

They'd be hard put to it to make a judgement on whose fault it was....:o

Not bright, our Plod!:lol:

the wallet and its contents are the property of its owner..lost or not.

If you find it, and fail to take steps to find the owner, you are guilty of theft by finding...you need reasonable excuse to defend this charge, and that reasonable excuse is to take the property to a Police Station or to advertise it.

If no owner is found, THEN the finder can have it back...after a reasonable time. finders fees sounds like theft to me...that would clearly encourage a light fingered person to "find" wallets all day, hand them in and walk scott free for his crimes.

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The wallet was his property. 'Finding' it did not involve any work. They had a legal duty to return his property.

Theft Act 1968:

Any assumption by a person of the rights of an owner amounts to an appropriation, and this includes, where he has come by the property (innocently or not) without stealing it, any later assumption of a right to it by keeping or dealing with it as owner.

the finders fee clearly amounts to an appropriation...the idea of the reward, for this is what this amounts to, is in the gift of the owner.

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While I think this is despicable, it is possible that they do actually have some legal right to charge a 'finder's fee'. My wife left her purse on a bus (containing a minimal amount of cash, but it did have her TfL staff pass in, which is why we were keen to get it back), and because I was a bit slow chasing it with the bus operating company (Stagecoach, coincidentally), it got sent on to the Baker Street office where I had to pay a fiver or so when I went to pick it up. From the TfL Page:

Property found in taxis is subject to an additional fee based on the value of the item. This award is given directly to the driver in recognition of their actions.

:(

I'm doing the knowledge at the moment, and if I manage to qualify as a cabbie I wouldn't dream of trying to profit from doing the right thing, but I wonder if I'll even have the option :rolleyes: .

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While I think this is despicable, it is possible that they do actually have some legal right to charge a 'finder's fee'. My wife left her purse on a bus (containing a minimal amount of cash, but it did have her TfL staff pass in, which is why we were keen to get it back), and because I was a bit slow chasing it with the bus operating company (Stagecoach, coincidentally), it got sent on to the Baker Street office where I had to pay a fiver or so when I went to pick it up. From the TfL Page:

:(

I'm doing the knowledge at the moment, and if I manage to qualify as a cabbie I wouldn't dream of trying to profit from doing the right thing, but I wonder if I'll even have the option :rolleyes: .

I suppose TfL and London Taxi drivers have laws that make them special cases, there are a lot of odd laws regarding hansom cabs, etc.

But in the case of Stagecoach, I doubt their charges are lawful.

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While I think this is despicable, it is possible that they do actually have some legal right to charge a 'finder's fee'. My wife left her purse on a bus (containing a minimal amount of cash, but it did have her TfL staff pass in, which is why we were keen to get it back), and because I was a bit slow chasing it with the bus operating company (Stagecoach, coincidentally), it got sent on to the Baker Street office where I had to pay a fiver or so when I went to pick it up. From the TfL Page:

From the website:

The LPO is guided in its function by two Acts of Parliament: the London Cab Order (1934) and the London Transport Act (1982). This legislation governs the time that property must be stored, the ownership of unclaimed items and the payment of fees and awards.

I've checked the OPSI website and the LCO 1934 does indeed exist and does contain provisions (section 51/52) relating to lost property, this applies to black cabs only.

I can find no trace of a LTA 1982. There is a Transport Act 1982 but this does not appear to include any provisions relating to lost property; I can't find any other obvious act that includes these provision either.

I wonder if they're acting on a correct legal basis?

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From the website:

The LPO is guided in its function by two Acts of Parliament: the London Cab Order (1934) and the London Transport Act (1982). This legislation governs the time that property must be stored, the ownership of unclaimed items and the payment of fees and awards.

I've checked the OPSI website and the LCO 1934 does indeed exist and does contain provisions (section 51/52) relating to lost property, this applies to black cabs only.

I can find no trace of a LTA 1982. There is a Transport Act 1982 but this does not appear to include any provisions relating to lost property; I can't find any other obvious act that includes these provision either.

I wonder if they're acting on a correct legal basis?

here is the policy summary for the black cabs..no mention of a reward:

Where information is reported to police that items of property are lost in a London 'Black Cab', a comprehensive record will be made of the report and this information sent to Transport for London (TfL) Lost Property Office (LPO). Where items of property are found in a London 'Black Cab' they will also be recorded and packaged before being forwarded to TfL (LPO). TfL (LPO) is responsible for the restoration of cab property, but where any property is restored by the MPS it can only take place on receipt of the charges due.

paying a fee is of course reasonable...having them dip into the value of the item to hand out as a reward is clearly theft under the theft Acts

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here is the policy summary for the black cabs..no mention of a reward:

Where information is reported to police that items of property are lost in a London 'Black Cab', a comprehensive record will be made of the report and this information sent to Transport for London (TfL) Lost Property Office (LPO). Where items of property are found in a London 'Black Cab' they will also be recorded and packaged before being forwarded to TfL (LPO). TfL (LPO) is responsible for the restoration of cab property, but where any property is restored by the MPS it can only take place on receipt of the charges due.

paying a fee is of course reasonable...having them dip into the value of the item to hand out as a reward is clearly theft under the theft Acts

Yes, a fee may be reasonable, and might be lawful, but it should represent the work done or inconvenience caused to the finder. That can not be reasonably be based on the assessed value of the item.

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