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Drug Smuggling Grandmother Sentence Of Firing Squad Upheld

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http://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/asia/grandmother-lindsay-sandiford-loses-bali-death-sentence-appeal-8790838.html

A British grandmother has lost her appeal against a death sentence for trafficking drugs into the resort island of Bali, it was confirmed today.

A three-judge panel at the Supreme Court in Jakarta unanimously rejected Lindsay Sandiford's appeal, spokesman Ridwan Mansur said.

The judges agreed with the decision taken by Bali's Denpasar district court, which sentenced Sandiford to death, and the island's high court, which rejected her first appeal.

A Foreign and Commonwealth Office spokesman said: "We are aware that Lindsay Sandiford's appeal to the Indonesian Supreme Court has been denied.

"In line with our strong opposition to the death penalty in all circumstances, we will consider how to support any application for Judicial Review or clemency that Lindsay Sandiford chooses to make.

"We will continue to provide consular assistance to Lindsay Sandiford and her family at this difficult time."

Sandiford, 56, from Cheltenham, Gloucestershire, was sentenced to death by firing squad after being found with cocaine worth an estimated £1.6 million as she arrived on the Indonesian island on a flight from Bangkok, Thailand, in May last year.

She was sentenced in January.

Balinese police claim Sandiford was at the centre of a drugs-importing ring involving three other Britons.

She denies the allegations, claiming she was forced to transport the drugs to protect her children, whose safety was at stake.

A similar defence as that used by the girls in Peru. Although she only had 4.8kg which is worth the same as the 11.5kg that the girls in Peru had??

Has any Britain had this type of sentence carried out in recent history or is clemency always shown in the end after every avenue of the appeal process has been used?

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http://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/asia/grandmother-lindsay-sandiford-loses-bali-death-sentence-appeal-8790838.html

A similar defence as that used by the girls in Peru. Although she only had 4.8kg which is worth the same as the 11.5kg that the girls in Peru had??

Has any Britain had this type of sentence carried out in recent history or is clemency always shown in the end after every avenue of the appeal process has been used?

Apparently there is a British guy out there on death row - been there for, IIRC, 8 years. Could be 11 years.

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This man was executed by the Chinese in 2009 for drug smuggling. Gordon Brown tried to get clemency, but they insisted on executing him.

Reading that I bet China and its drug problems are minuscule by UK standards..

As for the UK who are we to poke our noses into how other Countries run their justice system?

Same old same old if they can't do the time (or not in this case) don't do the crime.

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I don't agree with it, not for anybody. Saddam Hussein, Myra Hindley, nobody. It is just taking the power of the State way too far.

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I don't agree with it, not for anybody. Saddam Hussein, Myra Hindley, nobody. It is just taking the power of the State way too far.

....thing is Harry - people quickly learn to respect the laws and customs in countries where death or hands are chopped off! (or they die)

..........in the UK everyone laughs at the law

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....thing is Harry - people quickly learn to respect the laws and customs in countries where death or hands are chopped off! (or they die)

With all due respect, I disagree. The crime rate in US states which have the death penalty is higher than those which don't and always has been.

In the case of this woman, it's fairly obvious that she was a mule rather than a ringleader. I agree that she shouldn't have smuggled heroin but equally I don't agree that the state of Bali should have the right to kill her.

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With all due respect, I disagree. The crime rate in US states which have the death penalty is higher than those which don't and always has been.

Not surprising, given that states with high crime rates are the most likely to support a death penalty. Believing you can rehabilitate dangerous criminals is a luxury available only to low-crime states.

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I don't agree with it, not for anybody. Saddam Hussein, Myra Hindley, nobody. It is just taking the power of the State way too far.

A public stoning to death then? That way its not the state, its society exacting judgement. If people disagree with stoning to death they can form a human ring around the condemned, if not, they can join in the stoning.

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FWIW I dont think the death penalty alone is enough, Japan has it, but also has a very conservative shame based society. Can you honestly see any of those fat blubbing ghetto mothers in the US who always, without fail say 'my baby's a good boy, he d'int do it' hanging their heads in shame at the monsters they raise like the Japanese surely would? Why even bother to be a decent person if your own family and community will reward you for not being a decent person.

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With all due respect, I disagree. The crime rate in US states which have the death penalty is higher than those which don't and always has been.

But it's chicken and egg, isn't it? When the death penalty is used in democracies, it tends to be imposed and retained in ones that already have a seriously high murder rate, specifically as a response to that problem. The abolitionist US states are, as a general rule, sparsely populated and relatively wealthy: in other words, those that never had a major violent crime problem and probably never will. Alaska and Minnesota would be classic examples. Compare that with the states that have the highest number of executions (Texas and Florida): large, with densely populated cities, and seriously concentrated areas that have serious economic problems. So to argue that a high crime rate in jurisdictions that have the death penalty indicates that the death penalty doesn't work is problematic on a number of levels. It ignores the fact that capital punishment permanently incapacitates the offender, thus guaranteeing that (s)he will never offend again and in some cases providing 'closure' to the victim's family. And you can't necessarily claim that it doesn't deter potential murderers, because the murder rate might be even higher still if there was no death penalty.

As a general rule I do not support capital punishment. I think the nearest to my view is what is done in Japan: the do have the death penalty, but it is only used once in a blue moon and on the absolute worst of the worst: serial murderers, those whose murder(s) involved a substantial element of torture, etc. etc. Your average armed robber in a ghetto wouldn't qualify. They do roughly about one execution every decade.

In the case of this woman, it's fairly obvious that she was a mule rather than a ringleader. I agree that she shouldn't have smuggled heroin but equally I don't agree that the state of Bali should have the right to kill her.

The politics of this case are so weird that I suspect there's something significant that we're not being told. She was convicted in the same case as her associates, who were convicted for playing a more signfiicant or major role in the drug smuggling operation, but who did not receive the death sentence. The Indonesian government's semi-official line (i.e. what diplomats and 'experts' have told journalists, mainly off the record) is that her arrogance and refusal to show any remorse during the investigation and trial was the main reason. Unofficially, it has been widely speculated (including in reputable news media) that the real reason was her inability to pay bribes to the government and prosecutors.

Therefore, if the Indonesian government goes ahead with the execution, it will effectively be admitting to the world that it runs a corrupt legal system. But yet it shows every sign of being prepared to do so. The only rational explanation I can think of is that they actually want to send a message to would-be lowly drug mules that they are potentially (and literally!) in the firing line, in order to cut off the supply of mules that the more senior criminals have access to. In other words, in the aftermath of each highly publicised execution, there will be fewer people like Sandiford and the Peru girls willing to take the risk. I can't think of any other explanation.

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Outrageous.

Death by firing squad ( a group of snipers)...how barbaric.

In the US, the home of humanitarianism, they use the Gas Chamber.....so much more humane.....

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Therefore, if the Indonesian government goes ahead with the execution, it will effectively be admitting to the world that it runs a corrupt legal system. But yet it shows every sign of being prepared to do so. The only rational explanation I can think of is that they actually want to send a message to would-be lowly drug mules that they are potentially (and literally!) in the firing line, in order to cut off the supply of mules that the more senior criminals have access to. In other words, in the aftermath of each highly publicised execution, there will be fewer people like Sandiford and the Peru girls willing to take the risk. I can't think of any other explanation.

Corruption is assumed in SE Asia, so they are not admitting anything everyone doesn't already know and sending out a message to drug mules. No government is going to go into bat for a drug dealer in a major way so Indonesia isn't going get damaged in trade and it won't lose tourists over this either. From a brutal point of view, they have little to lose by shooting her.

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Reading that I bet China and its drug problems are minuscule by UK standards..

As for the UK who are we to poke our noses into how other Countries run their justice system?

Same old same old if they can't do the time (or not in this case) don't do the crime.

Didn't read the link, but drugs are a big problem in Asia, drug dealers think they won't get caught or they have paid off the right people.

The Chinese will execute any British drug dealer guaranteed. Bet they mentioned the Opium Wars in the hews report.

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A public stoning to death then? That way its not the state, its society exacting judgement. If people disagree with stoning to death they can form a human ring around the condemned, if not, they can join in the stoning.

I'd be well up for that- it'd be a pretty big stone that I couldn't catch and hurl back far faster than I received it <_< .

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I'd be well up for that- it'd be a pretty big stone that I couldn't catch and hurl back far faster than I received it <_< .

That would be the British version, with our sense of fair play. I can't imagine you'd be able to throw anything in foreign lands.

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The US are intrinsically different and will by a factor of numbers have a higher murder rate due to the availability of firearms.

If their population was the same as the UK then their murder rate would be higher by a magnitude.

If the poorer states ever hope to dispense with the ultimate penalty then they must deal with the weapons issue first.

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If the poorer states ever hope to dispense with the ultimate penalty then they must deal with the weapons issue first.

Capital punishment never appears to have worked as a deterrent to people committing murder. I doubt if they abolished capital punishment the murder rate would increase.

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The trouble with the death penalty is that it could be prone to abuse/incompetence by both the UK police and courts, with innocent people sent down and murdered by the state. Locking people up the most dangerous crazies and psychopaths then aging them to death in captivity is the most balanced solution.

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The US are intrinsically different and will by a factor of numbers have a higher murder rate due to the availability of firearms.

If their population was the same as the UK then their murder rate would be higher by a magnitude.

If the poorer states ever hope to dispense with the ultimate penalty then they must deal with the weapons issue first.

I read everywhere that most murders in the US are NOT with firearms...by a long way.

I also read everywhere that the US has large areas, huge areas of totally 3rd World living conditions where people prey on each other daily.

The US seems to be in a failed state in parts.

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The trouble with the death penalty is that it could be prone to abuse/incompetence by both the UK police and courts, with innocent people sent down and murdered by the state. Locking people up the most dangerous crazies and psychopaths then aging them to death in captivity is the most balanced solution.

There is no such thing as a Death Penalty....we all suffer Death at least once.

The sentence is actually a Curtailment of Life.

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