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Wurzel Of Highbridge

Watch Out London, It's The Black Death Not The Black Swan.

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Implications for London house prices if this spreads?

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2403099/Kyrgyzstan-lock-boy-15-dies-bubonic-plague.html

Return of the Black Death: Boy, 15, dies after eating groundhog infected with bubonic plague in Kyrgyzstan

An outbreak of the deadly bubonic plague has tormented the former Soviet republic of Kyrgyzstan after the death of a 15-year-old boy.

Three more people showed symptoms of the 'Black Death', and in total 131 came into contact with the victim.

More than 800 people have been screened in the town of Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan.

The disease wiped out tens of millions in 14th century Europe.

It was reported that 15-year-old Temirbek Isakunov died after eating a barbecued groundhog infected with the lethal virus, yet another account suggests he became infected after being bitten by an oriental flea carried by a marmot that he reportedly prepared for food.

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Surprising it hasn't been ratcheted right up into a full scale media and government panic scenario already. If it had been a couple of dead birds it would have been bird flu headlines all over.

Maybe there are no vaccines for "The Black Death".

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Surprising it hasn't been ratcheted right up into a full scale media and government panic scenario already. If it had been a couple of dead birds it would have been bird flu headlines all over.

Maybe there are no vaccines for "The Black Death".

It responds to antibiotics and the natural reservoirs are things like marmots and rats that are not exposed to antibiotics, so there is no selection pressure favouring antibiotic resistant strains of the pathogen, Yersinia pestis.

There are outbreaks in the modern era occurring after the discovery of bacteria but before the discovery of antibiotics, and they killed hundreds, but not thousands.

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AFAIK the plague killed about 95% of European population so we are the survivors with the genetic resistance ...

Re the Black Death - More around the 50% mark. About 25% for the UK / Northern Europe.

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AFAIK the plague killed about 95% of European population so we are the survivors with the genetic resistance ...

No, hardly that number. We all (not juts the Europeans) inherit antibiotics, better hygiene, less rats. It also didn't just hit Europe, but all over the world, India, China, central Asia.

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My advice - keep away from the groundhog and marmot kebab shops and you should be okay.

Groundhog and marmot are one and the same.

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This book is worth a read

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Return-Black-Death-Worlds-Greatest/dp/0470090006

They present a very convincing argument that the black death wasn't bubonic plague, a variety of evidence is presented, the most convincing to me is that bubonic plague still has outbreaks and just doesn't spread in the manner that the black death does, in fact it barely spreads at all. The evidence seems to point towards a unknown viral hemorrhagic fever something similar to the ebola/marburg virus.

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Groundhog and marmot are one and the same.

If that's the case, why does my local kebab shop charge extra for groundhog? Same way that haddock used to cost more than cod. :huh:

Later ........... I just popped down and asked them. Apparently the standard stuff is marmota menzbieri which comes from Eastern Europe and the Urals. It's brought over twice a week by a lorry driver called Igor. Most of it is roadkill, so it's a bit tough.

The more expensive stuff, which they sell as groundhog is marmota monax and is imported from the US after being fully certified and pumped full of antibiotics and growth hormones. Like most things from the US, it has more fat on it so the meat is juicier.

So I'm happy to change my earlier advice. You're safe to eat the groundhog (assuming it hasn't been mislabelled) but steer clear of the marmot.

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Later ........... I just popped down and asked them. Apparently the standard stuff is marmota menzbieri which comes from Eastern Europe and the Urals. It's brought over twice a week by a lorry driver called Igor. Most of it is roadkill, so it's a bit tough.

The more expensive stuff, which they sell as groundhog is marmota monax and is imported from the US after being fully certified and pumped full of antibiotics and growth hormones. Like most things from the US, it has more fat on it so the meat is juicier.

"What are you, a ***king park ranger now?"

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It's still endemic in the Rockies.

http://www.nbcnews.com/health/fortunate-be-alive-girl-7-contracts-bubonic-plague-colorado-campground-981919' rel="external nofollow">
DENVER -- A seven-year-old girl is recovering at a Denver hospital from a rare case of bubonic plague she likely contracted from fleas from a dead squirrel at a southwestern Colorado campground, hospital officials said on Wednesday.
Sierra Jane Downing is "fortunate to be alive," but is on the road to recovery after her near-fatal bout with the disease, the Rocky Mountain Hospital for Children said in a statement.

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