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DTMark

4G Tv Interference

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It's all happening, my proverbial prayers have been answered. Three 3G upgrade to dual channel HSPA and we now see up to 21Meg downstream (12Meg when it's going really slowly - this is our home broadband, no cable here), and EE have also rolled out 4G to this area which we should be able to get.

That was two weeks ago. We've always had a fairly weak TV signal which in the summer often struggles to pick up ITV channels on very hot days, but we don't get many of those and there's nothing much of any merit on those channels anyway. This year ITV has been OK for signal strength.

For the last two weeks I've noticed when flipping through the channels that quite a few of them report "WEAK SIGNAL" (comes up in red text) and glitch a lot. E4, Quest, and others - it hasn't been an issue insofar as it hasn't stopped us watching anything that we wanted to.

Aerial is still there undamaged, nothing else has changed.

Five miles away partner's mother has the same issue with her TV. The 4G rollout has been working in that direction. Aerial replaced, still the same.

The 4G rollout was predicted to impact some TV channels in some areas and our area has a weak overall signal anyway (GU34) because of the hilly topography.

Is anyone else seeing this? Is anyone into TV who can comment if this is likely to be 4G related?

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Might be worth trying one of these on your 3G. Unfortunately my experience is it's a bit hit or miss. Sometimes you'll be getting a weak signal and it'll give it a staggeringly massive shot in the arm other locations doesn't improve it at all.

Ordinarily I strongly disapprove of such behaviour but maybe try it and if no good send it back under distance selling regulations.

http://www.ruralbroadband.co.uk/3g-wibe

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Might be worth trying one of these on your 3G. Unfortunately my experience is it's a bit hit or miss. Sometimes you'll be getting a weak signal and it'll give it a staggeringly massive shot in the arm other locations doesn't improve it at all.

Ordinarily I strongly disapprove of such behaviour but maybe try it and if no good send it back under distance selling regulations.

http://www.ruralbroa...d.co.uk/3g-wibe

I mean the TV signal not the 3G one :)

3G flies along.... even streams HD TV fine..

2901474353.png

OK, parents have a basic 30Meg cheaper cable package which flies up to 31Meg downstream and just sits there all the time, but we can't get cable living in a rural area :( Thankfully most make do with the crap BT provides down the ancient phone lines so 3G is pretty uncontended here. Being 2700m from the cell means I'll never see the top speed of 42 Meg but 20 Meg for our area is incredible.

The 4G rollout was anticipated to cause problems with TV reception in some areas and I suspect ours may be one of them. Apparently you can get a "filter device" which you can put in the circuit from the aerial to help with that.

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It's all happening, my proverbial prayers have been answered. Three 3G upgrade to dual channel HSPA and we now see up to 21Meg downstream (12Meg when it's going really slowly - this is our home broadband, no cable here), and EE have also rolled out 4G to this area which we should be able to get.

That was two weeks ago. We've always had a fairly weak TV signal which in the summer often struggles to pick up ITV channels on very hot days, but we don't get many of those and there's nothing much of any merit on those channels anyway. This year ITV has been OK for signal strength.

For the last two weeks I've noticed when flipping through the channels that quite a few of them report "WEAK SIGNAL" (comes up in red text) and glitch a lot. E4, Quest, and others - it hasn't been an issue insofar as it hasn't stopped us watching anything that we wanted to.

Aerial is still there undamaged, nothing else has changed.

Five miles away partner's mother has the same issue with her TV. The 4G rollout has been working in that direction. Aerial replaced, still the same.

The 4G rollout was predicted to impact some TV channels in some areas and our area has a weak overall signal anyway (GU34) because of the hilly topography.

Is anyone else seeing this? Is anyone into TV who can comment if this is likely to be 4G related?

From what you describe, it does seem likely to be 4G-related interference.

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From what you describe, it does seem likely to be 4G-related interference.

No it isn't! It's me! I have a radio ham license and can pump out 400 Watts! :blink:

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I've had a look at the website which gives you the lowdown on what you should be able to get on Freeview in your area. That says we should get very good reception on all channels.

Thing is I'm not sure how accurate that is. For example, Three's coverage maps for their 3G are very good - our area is "hilly" and endearingly, there's a spot of "very good coverage" precisely where our house is surrounded by a sea of "OK coverage". We're higher up than some. I suspect it may also be done with actual feedback from modems and to some level of detail. Not sure the TV one is that intelligently worked out.

Moreover it does say that the transmitter we should be using is the Meridian one. I think our aerial points at the Guildford one as do quite a few others because there's a whacking great big slope at the back of the village directly in the "line of sight" so it may be that our previously fair signal (Guildford is only about 17 miles away though) has been weakened further.

I've put a piece in the village mag to ask if anyone else is seeing this problem. If so, time to get the landlords on the case to get a new TV aerial mounted higher up pointing the other way. Though it occurs that our 3G aerial is mounted about six feet below the TV one (we paid for that) and I wonder if that isn't helping. Though it's notionally 3G it was expensive and I picked it because it works at 4G frequency ranges too, looking ahead to when we might get that.

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I've had a look at the website which gives you the lowdown on what you should be able to get on Freeview in your area. That says we should get very good reception on all channels.

Thing is I'm not sure how accurate that is. For example, Three's coverage maps for their 3G are very good - our area is "hilly" and endearingly, there's a spot of "very good coverage" precisely where our house is surrounded by a sea of "OK coverage". We're higher up than some. I suspect it may also be done with actual feedback from modems and to some level of detail. Not sure the TV one is that intelligently worked out.

Moreover it does say that the transmitter we should be using is the Meridian one. I think our aerial points at the Guildford one as do quite a few others because there's a whacking great big slope at the back of the village directly in the "line of sight" so it may be that our previously fair signal (Guildford is only about 17 miles away though) has been weakened further.

I've put a piece in the village mag to ask if anyone else is seeing this problem. If so, time to get the landlords on the case to get a new TV aerial mounted higher up pointing the other way. Though it occurs that our 3G aerial is mounted about six feet below the TV one (we paid for that) and I wonder if that isn't helping. Though it's notionally 3G it was expensive and I picked it because it works at 4G frequency ranges too, looking ahead to when we might get that.

The simple answer is, in complex areas with a lot of 'clutter' (hills, buildings, etc.) not very accurate or reliable. Reflections can cause all sorts of problems with weak signals. However, if you are high up, I would think that weak signals are less of a problem.

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I've put a piece in the village mag to ask if anyone else is seeing this problem. If so, time to get the landlords on the case to get a new TV aerial mounted higher up pointing the other way. Though it occurs that our 3G aerial is mounted about six feet below the TV one (we paid for that) and I wonder if that isn't helping. Though it's notionally 3G it was expensive and I picked it because it works at 4G frequency ranges too, looking ahead to when we might get that.

What 3G aerial and/or reception kit are you using out of interest?

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What 3G aerial and/or reception kit are you using out of interest?

I *think* it's this one

http://www.solwise.c...-lpda-0092.html

That was plugged into my previous dongle, but then 3 rolled out DC-HSPA so I had to get a new dongle (E3267) and that doesn't have an antenna socket, so at the moment the antenna isn't being used - the dongle and router just sit on the window sill upstairs.

Not knowing enough about DC-HSPA... we have three "towers" in range and DC means it can connect to two cells. I don't know if the two cells have to be on the same tower. Assuming not, and the modem is free to select as it wishes, this might mean that an omni-directional antenna coupled with one of these:

http://www.amazon.co...=I3UW5TM785WP64

May actually be a better bet. SIM card in router/modem, new omni-antenna plugged into socket on the box.

Now that we have 4G available to us, I think that setup would work for both. However EE's 4G comes in at 90/mo for 30GB whereas Three is half that and it's actually more than quick enough for my usage. I never thought we'd be in a position of having choice.

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I *think* it's this one

http://www.solwise.c...-lpda-0092.html

That was plugged into my previous dongle, but then 3 rolled out DC-HSPA so I had to get a new dongle (E3267) and that doesn't have an antenna socket, so at the moment the antenna isn't being used - the dongle and router just sit on the window sill upstairs.

Not knowing enough about DC-HSPA... we have three "towers" in range and DC means it can connect to two cells. I don't know if the two cells have to be on the same tower. Assuming not, and the modem is free to select as it wishes, this might mean that an omni-directional antenna coupled with one of these:

http://www.amazon.co...=I3UW5TM785WP64

May actually be a better bet. SIM card in router/modem, new omni-antenna plugged into socket on the box.

Now that we have 4G available to us, I think that setup would work for both. However EE's 4G comes in at 90/mo for 30GB whereas Three is half that and it's actually more than quick enough for my usage. I never thought we'd be in a position of having choice.

So if EE are currently charging £90 a month as a monopoly for 4G and Three are chraging about £45 a month for decent 3G it would suggest that when a few more providers can offer 4G we should see a general softening of prices, landlines include. Yes/no?

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So if EE are currently charging £90 a month as a monopoly for 4G and Three are chraging about £45 a month for decent 3G it would suggest that when a few more providers can offer 4G we should see a general softening of prices, landlines include. Yes/no?

You'd have thought so. Most of the major operators have now announced their price plans for 4G however at this time they're all about the same - none of them stand out as cheaper.

Three committed to providing 4G at no extra cost. (DC-HSPA or what they call "Ultrafast" which is what they have now, is not 4G).

Actually 4G isn't all that expensive (IMO) until you start using large amounts of data. Working from home I'll tend to get through about 10GB of data per month but if we start watching stuff on Netflix that can rapidly balloon to 30GB per month and that is exacerbated by the faster speeds enabling Netflix and others to stream at higher quality levels/HD using even more data.

Most if not all of the 4G packages have quite meagre data limits - about 8GB is the limit.

Competition will bring the price down/the data allowances up in time, but what the operators really don't want is people like us using it as their primary broadband connection and there's a real danger of that because while 4G is unlikely to outperform cable it can very easily outperform ADSL and in some instances VDSL (BT "fibre to the cabinet").

4G might fly along at say 50Meg for you until a few neighbours start using it to stream HD TV - as it's a contended service, it can't just "add more bandwidth" that being the limitation of wireless services. So the pricing may remain prohibitive for heavier usage.

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