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crashmonitor

Breakfast Or Not ?

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Well I always have one myself. Even if it is only 500 calories..... porridge followed by two slices of toast. Yep I'm committing CARBicide. Here they recommend 700 calories.....

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/life/health-and-fitness/health/why-eating-a-bigger-breakfast-may-help-you-lose-weight/article13695602/

http://www.nursingtimes.net/home/behind-the-headlines/can-a-big-breakfast-help-you-lose-weight/5062195.article

This story seems to be doing the rounds today in the daily papers, but can't find the Times link.

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Never have brekkers or lunch during the week - or any food bar a light supper and whatever nutrition one gains from milk in the occasional coffee.

Mrs JTB says i've got the 5-2 thing the wrong way round!

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I can go all day without eating if I don't have breakfast. It's the first thing I eat that dictates how much I go on to eat. Or in other words, once I've started, I find it hard to stop.

You shouldn't be eating Pringles for breakfast...

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Guest eight

You shouldn't be eating Pringles for breakfast...

:lol:

More or less calories than McDonalds?

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I stopped eating it about 6 months ago. Lost 6 kilos. I don't miss it? If I don't have some carbs for lunch I can be a bit of a ..ehm...short termpered around dinner time but apart from that only good things so far.

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I can go all day without eating if I don't have breakfast. It's the first thing I eat that dictates how much I go on to eat. Or in other words, once I've started, I find it hard to stop.

That's what I find. As soon as I start eating then you have to continue eating? Whereas now, as I don't eat brekkie, I seem to just eat off my own fat (the way things should be).

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I can go all day without eating if I don't have breakfast. It's the first thing I eat that dictates how much I go on to eat. Or in other words, once I've started, I find it hard to stop.

Snap, with the exception of having a couple of egg, but that takes a few days before the effect really starts to kick in, and then after a week or so, it begins to have "uncomfortable side effects".

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Now I am biased, and I just skimmed through that, but this addreesses one of my criticisms of most controlled studies on dieting. Here they just seem to have tweaked one variable, breakfast, and then let the programme run, to see what the outcomes were. Quite applicable to real life.

The ones I don't like, are the ones where they try and completely control the daily intake, e.g. one group gets most of its calories morning, another gets them in the evening. As far as I can see, these will only ever work under the artificially imposed conditions of the study, which are ususally only for fairly limited duration.

On tap of that, even if they are correct, all these sorts of studies may only be true for 60 -90% of the population, for them to give apparently very convincing results and definitive advice for the entire population.

Best to experiment, and work out what works for you.

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Hw long after one has woken up is a 'breakfast' a 'breakfast'. Does the length of time that someone sleeps come into it? Is it the distance of the meals i.e. go x hours without any food might be the important factor. Or is it to do with sleep/wake states?

Is there a standard definition?

We need more research threads.

Calories are an illusion.

Our true source of sustenance is the pranayama which energises the cosmos.

If anyone wants to lose weight, shallow breaths, simples.

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My view no scientific evidence....two schools of thought........food eaten early in the day is used/burnt more efficiently, meaning the calories are used steadily throughout the day, food eaten late at night are more easily converted into fat during the night from the excess calories not used.

The less that is eaten generally so the stomach shrinks, therefore feels full.....people used to eating big heavy meals regularly will always feel not full up and therefore hungry because their stomachs have been used to being stretched so crave bulk to satisfy their needs.

So educate the stomach to accepting less. ;)

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I can go all day without eating if I don't have breakfast. It's the first thing I eat that dictates how much I go on to eat. Or in other words, once I've started, I find it hard to stop.

That's what I find. As soon as I start eating then you have to continue eating? Whereas now, as I don't eat brekkie, I seem to just eat off my own fat (the way things should be).

Snap, with the exception of having a couple of egg, but that takes a few days before the effect really starts to kick in, and then after a week or so, it begins to have "uncomfortable side effects".

Definitely agree, and nice to see others experience the same.

If facing a long strenuous day without time to eat, I might have some porridge because it lasts so long. But a cooked breakfast would be insane. I can't believe anyone still does that.

I'm currently breaking my own routine though by having a blended vegetable smoothie every morning (lettuce, cucumber, carrots etc). But this is purely for health reasons, due to a serious problem with heartburn this year. Interestingly it doesn't seem to create hunger the same way a cooked breakfast might or even porridge. So there are always exceptions.

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If facing a long strenuous day without time to eat, I might have some porridge because it lasts so long.

For you possibly, not everyone else though.

My understanding is that porridge has a highish glycemic index (compared to protein/ fat based foods) and gives up its calories relatively quickly

It lasts long time compared to cornflakes, which have a significantly higher GI, not as long time as a couple of fried eggs or a bag of peanuts

edit: I blame retro Ready Brek ads

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Now I am biased, and I just skimmed through that, but this addreesses one of my criticisms of most controlled studies on dieting. Here they just seem to have tweaked one variable, breakfast, and then let the programme run, to see what the outcomes were. Quite applicable to real life.

The ones I don't like, are the ones where they try and completely control the daily intake, e.g. one group gets most of its calories morning, another gets them in the evening. As far as I can see, these will only ever work under the artificially imposed conditions of the study, which are ususally only for fairly limited duration.

On tap of that, even if they are correct, all these sorts of studies may only be true for 60 -90% of the population, for them to give apparently very convincing results and definitive advice for the entire population.

Best to experiment, and work out what works for you.

Going by your username, I suspect it's just the bacon and sausages aspect that's annoying..

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For you possibly, not everyone else though.

My understanding is that porridge has a highish glycemic index (compared to protein/ fat based foods) and gives up its calories relatively quickly

It lasts long time compared to cornflakes, which have a significantly higher GI, not as long time as a couple of fried eggs or a bag of peanuts

edit: I blame retro Ready Brek ads

That porridge is slow-release is a myth IMHO

http://www.nutritionletter.net/general-nutrition/oatmeal-vs-omelet

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That porridge is slow-release is a myth IMHO

http://www.nutritionletter.net/general-nutrition/oatmeal-vs-omelet

If you make it with 'lashings of milk' as recommended in that ad I just pasted in above, it would bring the overall GI down and work better.

Them were the good old days of cereal manufacturers incorporating the contribution of the milk (and sometimes sugar) into the nutritional analysis of their products.

I remember being mightily impressed by the state of the art special FX in the Ready Brek ads as a kid. Shame it was BS.

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Short (but not very interesting or conclusive) anecdote. Had to go into hospital a few years ago for some minor poking around, and I got a note saying "make sure you have a light breakfast beforehand" so I thought about what was usually on the "Continental Breakfast" side of the menu, and made myself a nice bowl of porridge. I had assumed I was being instructed to get a few calories inside me, to make sure I didn't faint or anything, but apparently I was being told not to eat much. Apparently porridge sits in your stomach for several hours, and there's a danger of throwing up under anaethetic, so I got sent to the back of the queue.

The inconclusive part: it's impossible to tell these days, if doctors really know anything much about anything.

The punchline. When it was finally my turn, the doctor said to me, "sorry to keep you waiting, some idiot had porridge for breakfast, and it's messed up all our appointments" (or something). I have kind of mixed views on the NHS.

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