Jump to content
House Price Crash Forum

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

interestrateripoff

Barbara Cartland Complete Works To Be Published

Recommended Posts

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-23691203

All 823 of Barbara Cartland's novels, including 57 previously unseen works, are to be published as a result of a new distribution agreement.

The collection includes 160 manuscripts the prolific romance novelist left behind when she died 13 years ago.

News I'm sure we've all been waiting for! :lol:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

823 !! Where do they all end up? I'm a volunteer in a charity shop,and get tons of Catherine Cooksons in,but don't recall seeing a single Cartland in years.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think she was reportedly completing a book a week at her most prolific.

They must be sh*te.

Agreed. 823 is incredibly prolific.

I haven't read any of her stuff, and so can't comment on the sh!teness or otherwise of it. However, prolific doesn't have to mean sh!te - at least, not all of it. My great, great uncle was the film director Maurice Elvey, who is generally regarded as having been Britain's most prolific. Discounting uncredited stuff, he is usually considered to have directed 208 features during a career that stretched from the teens to the 50s, at the height of which he was knocking out a movie every fortnight. However, from what we can gather (no immediate relatives are still alive who actually knew him in adulthood, but this is what has been passed down in conversation), pretty much all he did was to supervise the actual filming on the set. Writing, set design, most of the rehearsals and all of the post-production was handled by others and his role in all of that ranged from miminal to non-existent. Maybe Cartland had a similar working method - have ghost writers and researchers do most of the gruntwork, and then finesse the final product herself?

Only around 30-40 of Elvey's films are known to survive, most of them from his later career, and so how 'good' his output was as a whole is impossible to judge. The ones I've seen look to me like they hold up pretty well compared to others of a similar era and budget. He seems to have liked doing sci-fi and political thrillers: High Treason and The Tunnel are both quite entertaining.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Cartland was much read by older ladies 30-40 years ago. Old fashioned historical romances, with heroes, cads, virginal heroines and happy endings.

Belongs to a past era and IMO unsaleable now. Cartland produced 28 'books' in a single year - 1983.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

They might have limited appeal nowadays (but probably not - given it's a global marketplace). But not necessarily rubbish.

I'm sure I've heard that one of the writers of the Doctor Who novelisations used to dash them off in a weekend. Admittedly, they were children's books, sometimes a bit repetitive in their phrasing and not very long - but that's quite a feat. Enid Blyton, of course, wrote more than 800 books in her lifetime. And someone I know wrote a BBC tv series tie-in factual book over the Easter holidays one year.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Enid Blyton, of course, wrote more than 800 books in her lifetime.

About eight of which could now be reprinted without contravening equality and diversity legislation.

"Oh look", said George, "there's a queer little wog". "Where?" said Dick. "Over in the bushes", said Julian. "Really, Dick, if you hadn't been so preoccupied with rogering Timmy, you would have seen him. Just because Uncle Quentin does that to you, that doesn't mean it's alright to do it to the dog as well." "Woof, woof", said Timmy.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Maybe Cartland had a similar working method - have ghost writers and researchers do most of the gruntwork, and then finesse the final product herself?

I can remember once seeing something on TV about her and it said she dictated the book to her PA. Maybe after the dictation it was given to someone else to clean up?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Agreed. 823 is incredibly prolific.

I haven't read any of her stuff, and so can't comment on the sh!teness or otherwise of it. However, prolific doesn't have to mean sh!te - at least, not all of it. My great, great uncle was the film director Maurice Elvey, who is generally regarded as having been Britain's most prolific. Discounting uncredited stuff, he is usually considered to have directed 208 features during a career that stretched from the teens to the 50s, at the height of which he was knocking out a movie every fortnight. However, from what we can gather (no immediate relatives are still alive who actually knew him in adulthood, but this is what has been passed down in conversation), pretty much all he did was to supervise the actual filming on the set. Writing, set design, most of the rehearsals and all of the post-production was handled by others and his role in all of that ranged from miminal to non-existent. Maybe Cartland had a similar working method - have ghost writers and researchers do most of the gruntwork, and then finesse the final product herself?

Only around 30-40 of Elvey's films are known to survive, most of them from his later career, and so how 'good' his output was as a whole is impossible to judge. The ones I've seen look to me like they hold up pretty well compared to others of a similar era and budget. He seems to have liked doing sci-fi and political thrillers: High Treason and The Tunnel are both quite entertaining.

So that's where your interest in film came from? Ashamed to say I'd never heard of your great uncle, I'll have a look at his work.

Regarding Cartland, I'm not sure there was ever any pretence that she was churning out anything other than lowest-common denominator slush.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So that's where your interest in film came from? Ashamed to say I'd never heard of your great uncle, I'll have a look at his work.

Regarding Cartland, I'm not sure there was ever any pretence that she was churning out anything other than lowest-common denominator slush.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

sorry!

One of the more bizarre things about dear old Barbara was that her work was translated into many other languages too. In the 1990s, I remember being in the Sahaflar çarşısı, the book market in Istanbul, and seeing racks and racks of her slush translated into Turkish for sale. On enquiry, I was told that it suited Turkish ladies as it appeared deeply romantic, did not offend the proprieties, and the simplicity of the language made it easy to translate into Turkish romantic idioms.

She was able to churn them out as she dictated at high speed to an assistant, had a sort of fact checker, employed a very competent editor, and rehashed basically the same story at least 800 times. It was a factory, efficiently organised.

There are some amusing parodies of her style included in the Viz Profanisaurus.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest eight

I have read every single one of them.

Come off it, even she hasn't read every single one of them, and she wrote them!

Bizarre what you could make a fat living off, pre the internet.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

sorry!

One of the more bizarre things about dear old Barbara was that her work was translated into many other languages too. In the 1990s, I remember being in the Sahaflar çarşısı, the book market in Istanbul, and seeing racks and racks of her slush translated into Turkish for sale. On enquiry, I was told that it suited Turkish ladies as it appeared deeply romantic, did not offend the proprieties, and the simplicity of the language made it easy to translate into Turkish romantic idioms.

She was able to churn them out as she dictated at high speed to an assistant, had a sort of fact checker, employed a very competent editor, and rehashed basically the same story at least 800 times. It was a factory, efficiently organised.

There are some amusing parodies of her style included in the Viz Profanisaurus.

I think "conkers deep" has one such parody.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Bizarre what you could make a fat living off, pre the internet.

Believe me, there are a number of self published ebook writers who are nearly as prolific (eg a book a month) and doing quite nicely out of it. Zombies and romance (either filthy shades of grey type stuff or human on vampire/werewolf action) seem to be particularly popular.

I suspect the equivalent of some of their output will probably be written by machine in a few years time.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • The Prime Minister stated that there were three Brexit options available to the UK:   203 members have voted

    1. 1. Which of the Prime Minister's options would you choose?


      • Leave with the negotiated deal
      • Remain
      • Leave with no deal

    Please sign in or register to vote in this poll. View topic


×

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.