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@contradevian

In The Uk An Affordable Home Is An Impossible Dream

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Good article. Glad some journalists are twigging it.

http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2013/aug/11/housing-renting-rising-property-prices

Every week, more friends are trickling down motorways from their homes of over a decade, another weekend of shovelling mattresses into vans in the awful tarmac sun, another forwarded email: "Does anybody want my wardrobe?"

When possible, they move into their mums' houses; when possible, their mums give them their savings. Last year, parents gave their children £2bn to help with housing costs; Shelter has launched a campaign imploring the government to build more new, affordable homes, because the current situation, it says, is unsustainable. The increase in the supply of mortgages (one in 10 of which is buy-to-let) and a chronic shortage of housing mean prices are rising at the fastest rate ever. We need more homes. We are overheating. We are the summer of 2008.

Not much sympathy for those trying to get on the "social housing ladder" though..

The hashtag #howtogetacouncilhouse revealed a humming swarm of racism and anger. "What a bunch of lazy, scrounging, teenage pregnant scum"; "Can someone knock me up please? I'm bored of paying a mortgage"; "How to get a council house? Become a Somali, have eight kids and then get a £2m house in London for a grand a month". If their opinions didn't exactly mirror those of Kirstie Allsopp, they certainly reflected them in a dirty puddle. She claims that young people are "losing the concept that you make sacrifices to get on the ladder". Sian Astley, a TV presenter, agreed. "Many twentysomethings seem to want Hollywood and handbags, rather than pensions and property… Hard work reaps rewards."

People shock me, constantly. Who still believes this? Who, in these times of zero-hours contracts still believes that the unemployed, the poor, the young, are simply not working hard enough? Who still believes that it is possible to buy a house on a single income, without an injection of family money?

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Good article. Glad some journalists are twigging it.

http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2013/aug/11/housing-renting-rising-property-prices

Not much sympathy for those trying to get on the "social housing ladder" though..

Yes, good article overall, she describes very well the impact of the housing crisis on the younger generation, and the pains that it causes.

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http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2013/aug/09/no-social-good-buy-to-let

Twenty years later, the result is that the housing market is totally inaccessible to most of a generation. Rents in London have gone up eight times faster than wages. Foreign landlords are driving a lot of the London transactions (they make money not just on the investment itself but on the currency exchange; an estate agent in the Brixton Foxtons told me he acted for a lot of Japanese buyers who would make £50k just in the act of buying a £500,000 flat). Seventy five percent of new homes in inner London are sold at overseas events and not even advertised to London buyers.

Plainly, no social good will come of this; rents will continue to rise, people who live in the city (and beyond – social geographers talk of a future "London" having a catchment area spreading from Bristol to Cambridge) will see their finances become more and more precarious. A brake on non-domiciled landlords – or at the very least, a tax on them – would solve only a tiny fraction of the problem. But nor is it insurmountable – there was very little capital equity, which is to say, nobody could afford their own house, in the 18th century, when building societies were created.

Mind having been around a bit, there is a lot of bubble talk here, and this usually ends up in one big enormous crash. I really hope it comes unstuck on Osborne's watch now.

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Good article. Glad some journalists are twigging it.

http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2013/aug/11/housing-renting-rising-property-prices

Not much sympathy for those trying to get on the "social housing ladder" though..

Never forget the Guardian rode the bubble like the rest of the media. Bit late for the hand wringing.

There has been a fantastic con played on young people. They've been made to believe social housing and welfare is anathema, while potentially they have the most to gain from a decent social housing policy and a rebalancing of the social contract between young and old.

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Never forget the Guardian rode the bubble like the rest of the media. Bit late for the hand wringing.

There has been a fantastic con played on young people. They've been made to believe social housing and welfare is anathema, while potentially they have the most to gain from a decent social housing policy and a rebalancing of the social contract between young and old.

Most of the welfare budget is spent on the over-60s. It is not in most young people's interests to support high/increased welfare spending.

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Good article. Glad some journalists are twigging it.

Agreed. The more columns given to these kinds of views the better. I think the old HPI = good meme is slowly receding in our group consciousness, probably helped by all these 30-somethings still living at home!

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Never forget the Guardian rode the bubble like the rest of the media. Bit late for the hand wringing.

There has been a fantastic con played on young people. They've been made to believe social housing and welfare is anathema, while potentially they have the most to gain from a decent social housing policy and a rebalancing of the social contract between young and old.

They did. But at least they've now realized the social evil that they were perpetuating and are actively speaking out against it.

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They did. But at least they've now realized the social evil that they were perpetuating and are actively speaking out against it.

They twist and they turn like a...twisty turny thing.

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Under offer at £71k

Last sold for £128k in 2006. Peak price on that road of £140k. All seem to be 3bed terrace/end terraces, so near 50% off peak.

Really seems that Detached houses have barely fell at all. Flats have cratered in value - very few seem to have lost less than 50% of value, everything else in between.

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They did. But at least they've now realized the social evil that they were perpetuating and are actively speaking out against it.

But in typical guardian fashion of demanding the govt taxpayer to do more rather than get out of the way and relax planning permission unfortunately.

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They did. But at least they've now realized the social evil that they were perpetuating and are actively speaking out against it.

The print media and broadcast media follow mainstream opinion to back a winner* i.e. sell copies and attract advertising - nothing we don't know.

They have detected a shift in sentiment among the population and among their readers as the 'priced out' start to be more important amongst their audience than the BTL-ers, and so they are changing to a new winner - good news for HPC-ers and it proves opinion is on the shift, and so property price inflation won't be seen as a means of speculative investment by amateurs in the future = house price falls.

I wouldn't credit the media with more than that, and probably, 'twas ever thus.

* and unfortunately, so do politicians through 'focus groups'

Edited by LiveinHope

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Never forget the Guardian rode the bubble like the rest of the media. Bit late for the hand wringing.

Yes, but much less than the others like the Express, Mail, & Times. Actually Grauniad have been one of the most vocal since 2008 about the structural imbalances in our housing market.

The overwhelming beneficiaries of the current welfare state and NHS are conservative voting, property owning over 60's. Nevertheless the media discourse is about the scrounging chavs and asylum seekers while any cursory view of the numbers show that this is not where the money is being spent. Anyone under 40 who is not aware of this is frankly moronic (say what you like about journalists, they are not all stupid) and its inevitable that such articles are going to be increasingly written by young and middle-aged journalists.

Unless affordable houses are built, prices are going to remain out of the reach of young people who are not from wealthy families or in high flying jobs, i.e most of the population.

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