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Sancho Panza

3 Million British 20-34 Year Olds Living With Parents.

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ONS 2011

'In 2011, nearly 3.0 million adults aged between 20 and 34 were living with a parent or parents, an increase of almost half a million, or 20 per cent, since 1997. This is despite the number of people in the population aged 20 to 34 being largely the same in 1997 and 2011.'

Mish 4/8/13

'PEW Social Trends research shows a Record 21.6 Million Young Adults Live in Their Parents’ Home.

Bernanke wants 2% inflation in a deflationary world. Wages have not kept up with inflation as Fed policies exacerbate the trends.

The result is apparent. Everyone pays the price, but especially Young adults who cannot afford to get married, and they certainly cannot afford a house.

The Fed wants home prices up to help out the banks, but what about the new household formation? And what about student loans and the ability to pay those loans back?

And think about how cheap money allows corporations to borrow money for next to nothing to buy technology to replace humans with hardware and software robots.

Trends noted by PEW and predicted in this corner at least six years ago are structural long-lasting trends.'

No wonder rents have been so restrained over the last ten years.

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ONS 2011

'In 2011, nearly 3.0 million adults aged between 20 and 34 were living with a parent or parents, an increase of almost half a million, or 20 per cent, since 1997. This is despite the number of people in the population aged 20 to 34 being largely the same in 1997 and 2011.'

Mish 4/8/13

'PEW Social Trends research shows a Record 21.6 Million Young Adults Live in Their Parents' Home.

Bernanke wants 2% inflation in a deflationary world. Wages have not kept up with inflation as Fed policies exacerbate the trends.

The result is apparent. Everyone pays the price, but especially Young adults who cannot afford to get married, and they certainly cannot afford a house.

The Fed wants home prices up to help out the banks, but what about the new household formation? And what about student loans and the ability to pay those loans back?

And think about how cheap money allows corporations to borrow money for next to nothing to buy technology to replace humans with hardware and software robots.

Trends noted by PEW and predicted in this corner at least six years ago are structural long-lasting trends.'

No wonder rents have been so restrained over the last ten years.

Yep, just dropped mine 50 quid a month, landlord said getting young punters (students) to cough up every month was well nigh impossible. 3 million, and growing probably, youngsters opting out of the debt Ponzi is going to have some nice effects for the HPC cause.

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Don't think its a case of choice and can't see this changing much. I didn't leave home till I was 27 and

It will change when the property debt Ponzi collapses, youngish people now will pick up cheap property in the future (if they even want it by that time)

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I left school in 2001 so my year group is all turning 30 this year. Five of my old school friends are still living with their parents. Four of them work full time for NMW, the fifth is long-term unemployed and has been unsurprisingly diagnosed with depression.

NMW is £6.19ph, so using this calculator a 37.5 hour week leaves you with £919 in your pocket at the end of each month. A room in a shared house in the south of England goes for around £400pm, add on council tax and utilities and you'll be doing well to have £400 discretionary income each month.

Until housing is cheaper it doesn't make sense for people like this to move out if their parents will have them. They would be taking on one enormous fixed cost on a 6/12 month contract that would completely sink them if they were out of work for a couple of months.

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I left school in 2001 so my year group is all turning 30 this year. Five of my old school friends are still living with their parents. Four of them work full time for NMW, the fifth is long-term unemployed and has been unsurprisingly diagnosed with depression.

NMW is £6.19ph, so using this calculator a 37.5 hour week leaves you with £919 in your pocket at the end of each month. A room in a shared house in the south of England goes for around £400pm, add on council tax and utilities and you'll be doing well to have £400 discretionary income each month.

Until housing is cheaper it doesn't make sense for people like this to move out if their parents will have them. They would be taking on one enormous fixed cost on a 6/12 month contract that would completely sink them if they were out of work for a couple of months.

And with less and less young people wanting to fund themselves through a joke degree the prospects for BTL just get worse and worse?

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I left school in 2001 so my year group is all turning 30 this year. Five of my old school friends are still living with their parents. Four of them work full time for NMW, the fifth is long-term unemployed and has been unsurprisingly diagnosed with depression.

NMW is £6.19ph, so using this calculator a 37.5 hour week leaves you with £919 in your pocket at the end of each month. A room in a shared house in the south of England goes for around £400pm, add on council tax and utilities and you'll be doing well to have £400 discretionary income each month.

Until housing is cheaper it doesn't make sense for people like this to move out if their parents will have them. They would be taking on one enormous fixed cost on a 6/12 month contract that would completely sink them if they were out of work for a couple of months.

Excellent post.

The problem is low wages and poor/no job security.

Yet, the supply siders incredibly want to see even lower wages and less job security.

Insanity.

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I left school in 2001 so my year group is all turning 30 this year. Five of my old school friends are still living with their parents. Four of them work full time for NMW, the fifth is long-term unemployed and has been unsurprisingly diagnosed with depression.

NMW is £6.19ph, so using this calculator a 37.5 hour week leaves you with £919 in your pocket at the end of each month. A room in a shared house in the south of England goes for around £400pm, add on council tax and utilities and you'll be doing well to have £400 discretionary income each month.

Until housing is cheaper it doesn't make sense for people like this to move out if their parents will have them. They would be taking on one enormous fixed cost on a 6/12 month contract that would completely sink them if they were out of work for a couple of months.

....This is the growing elephant in the room......the young people I know, out of uni and college have no other place to go and can't secure a London job that will pay the rents the London debt mortgage holders are wanting........They would be mad to pay their asking prices even if they could, at home they get their food cooked and washing done if lucky and their earned money if they can get a job goes into the family purse and towards savings.......the priced out homeless without work or secure worthwhile work living in a country that is doing very little or anything at all about it apart from brushing it under the carpet. ;)

Edited by winkie

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I left school in 2001 so my year group is all turning 30 this year. Five of my old school friends are still living with their parents. Four of them work full time for NMW, the fifth is long-term unemployed and has been unsurprisingly diagnosed with depression.

NMW is £6.19ph, so using this calculator a 37.5 hour week leaves you with £919 in your pocket at the end of each month. A room in a shared house in the south of England goes for around £400pm, add on council tax and utilities and you'll be doing well to have £400 discretionary income each month.

Until housing is cheaper it doesn't make sense for people like this to move out if their parents will have them. They would be taking on one enormous fixed cost on a 6/12 month contract that would completely sink them if they were out of work for a couple of months.

Same here (Although I'm 29 this year, guess you had a sixth form at your secondary school?)

Where in the country are you? I don't know many people in my age group who are in the same position as me...

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Same here (Although I'm 29 this year, guess you had a sixth form at your secondary school?)

Where in the country are you? I don't know many people in my age group who are in the same position as me...

Yes, we had a sixth form. My home town is in SE England.

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Yes, we had a sixth form. My home town is in SE England.

Same here.

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This has got to be the most amazing coincidence because my school was in the south east and it too had a 6th form. How spooky is that. ;)

Stalker

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I'm 29 this year too. I am married and we live with my mother. Very uncool but everyone gets on (more or less) and it has allowed us to save a 25% deposit. Where I am in Scotland, privately renting makes zero sense unless you are getting housing benefit. With our deposit our mortgage will cost half as much as private rent.

The only problem we are having is that there are no houses for sale that we would actually want to buy.

I don't understand why any young person in the South East that isn't earning mega bucks want's to live there.

Edited by lovelyhead

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Is everyone reading this thread 29 and living with parents?

....I'm 29 and have just moved back in with the parents btw....

My brother is 29 and lives with my/our parents

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