Jump to content
House Price Crash Forum

How To Get A Council House C4 Now.


Recommended Posts

When I got one - you would be offered two 'as an emergency' option and then if you rejected both you'd get offered nothing again for probably forever as you'd be deemed to not to actually be in housing emergency need at all.

I refused the first one as it was directly opposite my soon to be ex's house and accepted the next one.

The one I took had been home to a smoker who had a million pictures on the wall. Once their wallpaper was stripped off it was fine though.

The first one they showed me was a great flat, just needed decorating. However it had an old two bar electric fire mounted on the wall which seemed to put most people off (don't know why as the place had full gch). Looked worse than it was because the Council by default strip any place of carpets (even if they are new).

Heard comments like it was "pokey" but it wasn't at all. It was 1960/70's so generously sized. Even the Council staff were taken a back by the comments, one saying "it looks a perfectly nice flat to me" and I agreed. I sensed they get this all the time.

It was apparent only me and another guy were interested and he got it, because he'd been on the list longer.

The second one they offered there was no competition. In fact I don't even think I bid on it. It turned out to be perfect and had recently been completely been redecorated by the former tenants and the kitchen, bathroom all brand new (council basic but perfectly OK).

One thing about Council offers, you do usually have to accept them straight away. Can be a problem if you are a private tenant on a fixed term contract.

Edited by aSecureTenant
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Replies 77
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

I'm assuming that Right to Buy kicks in after you've succeeded in getting the place. How long after? That presumably can take yet another social housing property off the market, and makes the demand/waiting list problem worse. Is that the case? What are the rules?

Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm assuming that Right to Buy kicks in after you've succeeded in getting the place. How long after? That presumably can take yet another social housing property off the market, and makes the demand/waiting list problem worse. Is that the case? What are the rules?

Ah, I wonder if this accounts for the fussiness. Are people hoping to be given a place in a more desirable location so they can maximise profits when they buy and sell on?

Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm assuming that Right to Buy kicks in after you've succeeded in getting the place. How long after? That presumably can take yet another social housing property off the market, and makes the demand/waiting list problem worse. Is that the case? What are the rules?

50% after five years for a flat 35% for a house.

You could argue that you are building up RTB "equity" at 10% a year for a flat.

Bear in mind that you might have to repay the RTB discount if you sell within 5 years. Whether anyone does or not is another matter.

I don''t think it results in all the fussiness because RTB is portable between council properties.

Link to post
Share on other sites

The striking comment I heard was that the same ex council flat in private hands would cost £300 per week instead of the council £113,which is ironic as most of the ex council flats are in the hands of pruivate Buy to Letters.

Not the most successful policy of the 1980's.

Except electorally of course it was; I have arguments to this day with people who still think it is A Good Thing.

That Labour did not reverse this policy, or at least allow councils to use the capital receipts to build more homes, is to their shame.

I say extend Right To Buy to private tenants, with a mandatory discount to offset rent paid over the years.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I say extend Right To Buy to private tenants, with a mandatory discount to offset rent paid over the years.

Couldn't agree more and would help break up these huge portfolio's that the land hoarders have been amassing.

If you support RTB in the social sector then you have to support it in the private IMO, and the private sector is to a large extent publicly supported.

Link to post
Share on other sites

In the 80s growing up there were kids in big post-war councils homes more spacious than the mortgaged home where I lived. Friends that lived in them always had all the latest tellies, VCRs and HIFIs because the rent was b'all.

Lower-middle class people like my parents would effectively have a big mortgage and not much spare money for the cachet of not living in a council house/estate.

Now even that's gone as the private house next door with the hefty rent could be rented to people on benefits via HB for free. Or your big mortgage could be on an ex-council flat.

The neoliberals have really scammed us. Surely the mixed-economy model where a bus conductor could raise a family in London in a nice spacious council home was a sort of utopia?

The megarich had better watch out else millions are going to conclude a mild form of communism could probably suit them better. The 'calm life' as some Eastern Europeans refer to their parents' existence under such systems.

Link to post
Share on other sites

In the 80s growing up there were kids in big post-war councils homes more spacious than the mortgaged home where I lived. Friends that lived in them always had all the latest tellies, VCRs and HIFIs because the rent was b'all.

Lower-middle class people like my parents would effectively have a big mortgage and not much spare money for the cachet of not living in a council house/estate.

Now even that's gone as the private house next door with the hefty rent could be rented to people on benefits via HB for free. Or your big mortgage could be on an ex-council flat.

The neoliberals have really scammed us. Surely the mixed-economy model where a bus conductor could raise a family in London in a nice spacious council home was a sort of utopia?

The megarich had better watch out else millions are going to conclude a mild form of communism could probably suit them better. The 'calm life' as some Eastern Europeans refer to their parents' existence under such systems.

Speaking to my cousins about this and the tipping point appeared to be around the 70's when a spacious new semi-detached was affordable (especially up here in the North) and made buying, compared to renting from the Council a bit of a no brainer.

London of course is a different planet entirely and the inner suburbs have never been particularly affordable to the 'working man' without State intervention (as you point out). Also some of the most expensive areas of London now (Notting Hill, even St Johns Wood) were once notorious slums.

Edited by aSecureTenant
Link to post
Share on other sites

I think a lot of it is making your own luck and being in the right place at the right time. I guess a lot of people put their names down, then forget, or don't check up and don't answer their phones when the Housing Officer rings them up. Some might not be actively bidding.

Hmmm? No housing officer ever rang me :blink: Not ever.

I get the occasional letter offering shared ownership, but that's all. I've even been to view a couple of those, but wasn't impressed (I could point at blog entries about them).

Link to post
Share on other sites

I watched this program this morning. Thanks to all the posters on this thread for drawing it to my attention.

I grew up on a couple of council estates but no longer have much idea how this all works. I have some questions:

1, the method for allocating council housing shown on the program, (those with the greatest need, be it kids or disability go straight to the top of the list) is that universal, I mean do all councils in the UK use this method, do any give any weighting to things like your ties to the area, whether you have family nearby or whatever?

2, if allocating housing based on need (kids or disability) were universal, then surely the young couple who lived in the room, the recruitment consultant and his family, the bloke who was a guardian of his two grandaughters, they would all be better off if they just left London and went to somewhere with a lot of social housing like Portsmouth or Plymouth or Swansea or similar, and declared themselves homeless there, as they would probably be housed decently a good deal quicker as I guess Portsmouth, Plymouth and Swansea don't have the population pressures that Tower Hamlets has and also, they have great need as they all have kids or have kids on the way - right?

Link to post
Share on other sites

Ah, I wonder if this accounts for the fussiness. Are people hoping to be given a place in a more desirable location so they can maximise profits when they buy and sell on?

On the nail. That accounts for why the (Asian?) lady was so keen on somewhere with a parking space. She didn't drive or own a car.Could she be thinking ahead to resale day?..

Edited by juvenal
Link to post
Share on other sites

On the nail. That accounts for why the (Asian?) lady was so keen on somewhere with a parking space. She didn't drive or own a car.Could she be thinking ahead to resale day?..

I so hope this wasn't the case. If I was a parent applying for council housing then my main concern would be enough space and comfort for the children to play and to do homework in. Her daughter was studying for A-Levels and I guess the sons were still at school Council homes should not be seen as a potential cash cow in a decade's time. :unsure: Who knows? Hopefully the London property market will tank by then?? Or Right To Buy will be abolished. :blink: Is that a flying pig? :lol:

Who knows? Maybe the children in this episode will do so well in their careers that they will buy their parents a house one day to retire in. :)

Re: The ground floor flat that the male pensioner didn't bother to go and view. I'm surprised that the 2nd priority tenant, an 83 year old lady with mobility problems of her own, accepted it instead. Desite being a ground floor flat, there were still about 10 steps to get to it and the lift didn't stop at the actual ground floor. Seems a strange set up.

Link to post
Share on other sites

On the nail. That accounts for why the (Asian?) lady was so keen on somewhere with a parking space. She didn't drive or own a car.Could she be thinking ahead to resale day?..

No it doesn't. The RTB discount goes with the tenant, not the property.

Would make more sense to accept anything just to get on the "council housing ladder" so to speak.

IMO if you reject properties without a really good reason you should be knocked down to the bottom of the queue, and after a couple of strikes, you are out.

Edited by aSecureTenant
Link to post
Share on other sites

I distinctly remember a few people on this forum arguing that council house rent is not subsidised...but clearly this program shows it to be the case?

On another note, did anyone catch that Asian woman's youngest son (when they talked about how they shared the bed), he had an iPhone 4/4S. Hes probably 10-12 years old. These people don't need council houses. Seriously :/

Link to post
Share on other sites

I distinctly remember a few people on this forum arguing that council house rent is not subsidised...but clearly this program shows it to be the case?

1. Where I live many single one bed/studio places on the private market are now at social rent levels. There is probably a case for the LHA rate to fall but they can't without it making certain types of Council properties look expensive. Bear in mind that Housing Association rents are even higher!

2. One of the social properties the recruitment consultant guy bid on was over £200 pw!

Fairly certain a private rental could be found at that level. Probably not Tower Hamlets, maybe in neighbouring Newham, or Barking & Dagenham/Havering?

3. Apparently, where I live the ALMO now operates within the money it receives from rent revenues.

Edited by aSecureTenant
Link to post
Share on other sites

3. Apparently, where I live the ALMO now operates within the money it receives from rent revenues.

Yep.

As a tenant of a normal council house I can tell you that our council agreed in April 2011 to pay off their 'historical debt' to central government. Around 10 million was borrowed from high street banks at around 5% over 30 years. Most other councils have followed.

So roughly half my rent goes to the banks and half goes for repairs etc.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Yep.

As a tenant of a normal council house I can tell you that our council agreed in April 2011 to pay off their 'historical debt' to central government. Around 10 million was borrowed from high street banks at around 5% over 30 years. Most other councils have followed.

So roughly half my rent goes to the banks and half goes for repairs etc.

..and as durhamborn has pointed out, ALMO staff are usually employed on very generous terms, good pensions, generous paid leave etc..

Link to post
Share on other sites

2. One of the social properties the recruitment consultant guy bid on was over £200 pw!

Fairly certain a private rental could be found at that level. Probably not Tower Hamlets, maybe in neighbouring Newham, or Barking & Dagenham/Havering?

The guy has a wife and 2 kids so I assume he was bidding on flats with at least 2 bedrooms. No way you would get that for £200pw (=£880pm) in the private sector. That's about the price I would expect for a privately rented basic 1 bedroom flat in London nowadays.

I'm sure you're right that social and private sector rents are pretty level in the town where you live but there is a huge difference in London.

Link to post
Share on other sites

It's amazing the amount some people get just for phoning the plumber every so often....

http://www.insidehou...orycode=6527962

It just doesn't need ALMO or HA management to be paid these amounts of remuneration. Especially ALMO's which is basically managing a legacy housing stock and estate management. It just doesn't need that level of "talent."

Annoys me because the Housing gravy train give social housing a bad press and we the tenants get the blame for being the 'subsidised' scumbags.

Most of the Social housing in the country was bought and paid for bloody ages ago, and thats before we get into the fact that the private contractors "gerry built" some of it with the Councils having to pick up the tab for putting it right.

Edited by aSecureTenant
Link to post
Share on other sites

Worcester Council manages to halve its applicant list!

http://www.24dash.com/news/local_government/2013-08-07-Council-halves-housing-applicants?utm_source=dlvr.it&utm_medium=twitter

At the start of April there were 4,500 applicants on the register. The council’s strategic housing team contacted them all and asked them to re-register, giving them three months to respond. Any that did not reply were removed from the list.

The result is that there are now 2,393 households listed.

Surprised they didn't do that before!

Link to post
Share on other sites

What the feck are councils doing offering council tenants luxury accommodation like that flat? The idiots should agree to rent out properties like that privately and the money made going towards providing much cheaper housing elsewhere. Disgraceful use of taxpayers money.

Link to post
Share on other sites

What the feck are councils doing offering council tenants luxury accommodation like that flat? The idiots should agree to rent out properties like that privately and the money made going towards providing much cheaper housing elsewhere. Disgraceful use of taxpayers money.

Probably because a proportion of new developments in London need a quota of social housing built for "affordable rent."

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • 434 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.