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Alcohol Sales Down 6-10%?

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http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-23502892

Consumption of alcohol, having reached a peak in 2000, is declining in the UK. The number of people who never drink is rising. Alcohol sales are falling, with a drop of as much as 6-10% in the past 12 months, according to retail analyst Mintel.

Was reading this article about the decline in alcopops and found this stat, which appears to be showing a very large drop in alcohol sales and ultimately must mean that the Treasury is taking a big hit on the taxes. It's almost as if the magic tax rising escalator has broken and people are now making other choices.

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http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-23502892

Was reading this article about the decline in alcopops and found this stat, which appears to be showing a very large drop in alcohol sales and ultimately must mean that the Treasury is taking a big hit on the taxes. It's almost as if the magic tax rising escalator has broken and people are now making other choices.

Alcohol is pretty expensive compared to other groceries so as disposable income falls, people may well be cutting down on how much they buy at the supermarket after they break down their shopping bills.

It's outrageously expensive in pubs these days too, plus pubs have taken a hit from the smoking ban reducing custom. I'm not short of disposable income but some of the prices I see for a basic pint really make me think twice about my speed of knocking them back. If I was younger, probably with a lot less money to spare, I've no idea how I'd be able to go out and drink in pubs these days. I've noticed a really marked falloff in pub crowd numbers over the last 6-7 years since boom turned to bust and of course there are less and less pubs too. Plus people are leaving it later and later before they go out (possibly balanced by more consumption at home first, though). All this has also probably impacted overall consumption.

It will be interested to see if the government continues to treat booze as a goose that lays golden revenue eggs and if they will eventually kill it, as per the fairytale. My guess is that they will back off the constant tax hikes as they have done with road fuel.

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Sharing a bottle of wine at my local now costs £15. It is now empty and cold, so why even pay for the atmosphere. Depressing, I miss it.

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Alcohol sales per person have been falling for some time: beer sales are at best even (tho we are drinking much better quality: independent real ales are grwoing)

I would think the greater proportion of Muslims would affect sales too - any pubs left in Tower Hamlets?

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Alcohol is more expensive here, but the pubs are full. I think that pubs are more to do with culture than price.

[edit[ The UK has no culture is was destroyed by immigration discuss (link to daily mail)

anyway we might pop out once a fortnight for a couple of pints on a Friiday evening, but generally I brew (ferment) my own wine. It is much much cheaper than buying and the quality is superb.

30 bittle wine kits €65

30 bottle wine kits for €50

Before moving to Ireland we lived in Dover so used to go over to france every now and then and pickup some good bottles at €3. I do believe that the homebrew is better quality than the cheap stuff as the cheap wine is usually made with the poorer quality grapes and many of the wines are only 50% grape juice then made up to strength with sugar thus a watery wine.

Edited by Gone to Ireland.

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Mobile phone culture killed pubs IMO, who wants to be around groups of self absorbed w*ankers talking loudly, or texting like they are some kind of robot into a handset? People are too lacking in social skills now for pubs to thrive IMO. You can get decent single malts for £25 in any supermarket, and if you limit yourself to a glass or two in the evening it will last a while. I am specifically buying less alcohol because of the tax/vat dimension as I won`t feed a government that runs a house price Ponzi economy, and I avoid take away because it starves the businesses that pay rates to the council that demands I pay council tax with menaces. They can`t have it all ways, something is going to give.

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I'm not sure if it's food sales. My local spoons is probably the only pub that gets a decent amount of footfall all days of the week.

I think they are popular because they are cheap and don't try to be anything but a pub. They have a good selection of booze and I can go there and have a chat with my mates. I won't be deafened by loud music.

Having said that, I tend to avoid it on a Saturday. Too busy.

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Profit mainly due to food sales?

I find them now just as expensive as the local pub in terms of alcohol. In fact on Mondays the local is about 20p a pint cheaper than spoons with the drink offers.

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Alcohol is pretty expensive compared to other groceries so as disposable income falls, people may well be cutting down on how much they buy at the supermarket after they break down their shopping bills.

A bottle of wine often doubles the price of dinner at home for two.

I think with a £5 bottle, about £3 is tax. It would feel very different if I could buy it tax free for £2.

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Alcohol is pretty expensive compared to other groceries so as disposable income falls, people may well be cutting down on how much they buy at the supermarket after they break down their shopping bills.

It's outrageously expensive in pubs these days too, plus pubs have taken a hit from the smoking ban reducing custom. I'm not short of disposable income but some of the prices I see for a basic pint really make me think twice about my speed of knocking them back. If I was younger, probably with a lot less money to spare, I've no idea how I'd be able to go out and drink in pubs these days. I've noticed a really marked falloff in pub crowd numbers over the last 6-7 years since boom turned to bust and of course there are less and less pubs too. Plus people are leaving it later and later before they go out (possibly balanced by more consumption at home first, though). All this has also probably impacted overall consumption.

Beer sales are down 5.8% 2nd quarter 2013

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Isn't this excellent news?

If "nobody can afford to go out because they are having to hand over every penny they earn to the bank and the utility companies" is excellent news, then I suppose it's excellent news. ;)

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Isn't this excellent news?

If your the govt probably not as tax revenues go down. The idea of increasing taxes isn't to discourage us from drinking but to collect more tax for the sociopaths to spend.

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Alcohol is more expensive here, but the pubs are full. I think that pubs are more to do with culture than price.

[edit[ The UK has no culture is was destroyed by immigration discuss (link to daily mail)

anyway we might pop out once a fortnight for a couple of pints on a Friiday evening, but generally I brew (ferment) my own wine. It is much much cheaper than buying and the quality is superb.

30 bittle wine kits €65

30 bottle wine kits for €50

Before moving to Ireland we lived in Dover so used to go over to france every now and then and pickup some good bottles at €3. I do believe that the homebrew is better quality than the cheap stuff as the cheap wine is usually made with the poorer quality grapes and many of the wines are only 50% grape juice then made up to strength with sugar thus a watery wine.

dunno about lackof culture, but our local has a nest of chavs living outside...they size you up on entry and exit...no trouble, but the eyeing up is offputting, so we dont go.

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Mobile phone culture killed pubs IMO, who wants to be around groups of self absorbed w*ankers talking loudly, or texting like they are some kind of robot into a handset?

A very interesting point...

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Alcohol sales down? Means an upturn in the general health of the nation and possibly a bit of wealth too.

I'll drink to that! ;)

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They get enough of my hard-earned via income tax and national insurance. They can whistle for anything else from my discretionary spending if i can help it.

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http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-23502892

Was reading this article about the decline in alcopops and found this stat, which appears to be showing a very large drop in alcohol sales and ultimately must mean that the Treasury is taking a big hit on the taxes. It's almost as if the magic tax rising escalator has broken and people are now making other choices.

Alcopops alive and well

http://petebrown.blogspot.co.uk/2013/08/alcopop-drink-that-dare-not-speak-its.html

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