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Fast-Food Workers In Nyc Stage Strikes, Rallies

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http://bigstory.ap.org/article/fast-food-workers-nyc-stage-strikes-rallies

Workers at McDonald's, Burger King and Wendy's restaurants across New York walked out Monday in a one-day strike to demand better pay and the right to unionize, calling for minimum wage to more than double from $7.25 to $15 an hour and the end to what activists called "abusive labor practices."

"It's noisy, it's really hot, fast, they rush you. Sometimes you don't even get breaks. All for $7.25? It's crazy," said Nathalia Sepulveda, who works at a McDonald's opposite Yankee Stadium in the Bronx, where one protest took place.

Outside the McDonald's as well as a Wendy's in lower Manhattan, workers chanted "we can't survive on $7.25" and "supersize our wages." At the Wendy's, the crowd shouted at customers not to go in and two police officers were stationed inside.

http://www.latimes.com/business/money/la-fi-mo-fast-food-strike-minimum-wage-20130729,0,1355524.story

..

Head honchos get $11.9 million a year on average, including options, while full-time employees earn $15,080, according to the group.

A separate report in July from the National Employment Law Project, which backs low-wage workers, showed few fast food workers rising into the ranks of upper management.

But in reaction to Monday’s walkouts, the right-leaning Employment Policies Institute said that a $15 minimum wage threshold would actually pose a hardship for employees, especially in the low-margin restaurant industry.

Tight-pressed eateries forced to pay higher salaries would likely start shifting from human labor to automated technology such as touch-screen ordering or payment devices, according to the group.

Looks like the wealth extraction process is well and truly broken, $7.25 an hour isn't going to go too far in the US, still they can always get a 2nd and maybe a 3rd job. In the fast food industry zero tips to make up the difference, still at least the big wigs gets share options etc..... for all the hard work they put in, paying those golfing fees won't be cheap and has to be funded somehow.

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Tight-pressed eateries forced to pay higher salaries would likely start shifting from human labor to automated technology such as touch-screen ordering or payment devices, according to the group

Somebody posted a short story about that the other month - it was pretty crap overall but it started good.

Can't remember what it was called though so this post is about a useless as one of the CEO's!

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Somebody posted a short story about that the other month - it was pretty crap overall but it started good.

Can't remember what it was called though so this post is about a useless as one of the CEO's!

Thing is, I'm sure they'd automate it if they possibly could. And to be honest, automating away a swathe of unpleasant retail/service jobs would, in a properly organised and sane economy, be a good thing.

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Thing is, I'm sure they'd automate it if they possibly could. And to be honest, automating away a swathe of unpleasant retail/service jobs would, in a properly organised and sane economy, be a good thing.

I saw this on another website Artificial Intelligence and human unemployment

The thesis is that people will generally be reallocated to other areas of the workforce which are harder or less profitable to automate.

"When I was young I never expected to be so poor that I could not afford a servant, or so rich that I could afford a motor car."

- Agatha Christie

Just because fewer people are employed as servants does not mean the people who would have been employed thus have ceased to exist or have been made redundant.

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Just because fewer people are employed as servants does not mean the people who would have been employed thus have ceased to exist or have been made redundant.

Hence the 'properly organised and sane' statement.

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Thing is, I'm sure they'd automate it if they possibly could. And to be honest, automating away a swathe of unpleasant retail/service jobs would, in a properly organised and sane economy, be a good thing.

Out of interest what would the people currently employed in this sector do for a job then?

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I worked at McDs part-time when I was studying for my GCSEs and A levels. It was bloody hard work and I witnessed some truly dreadful employment practices including the lack of breaks as mentioned in the article. I was too young to know any better. It wasn't all bad though. It was a good laugh sometimes, especially the late shift and it was good to be working amongst people my own age. I made some good friends and it taught me some good life skills.

Obviously it's a completely different scenario if you're not a youngster and it's your primary source of income. That would be a nightmare. Which is why you will rarely see anyone over the age of 25 working at a fast food restaurant.

Edited by Priced_Out_GenXer

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I saw this on another website Artificial Intelligence and human unemployment

The thesis is that people will generally be reallocated to other areas of the workforce which are harder or less profitable to automate.

Just because fewer people are employed as servants does not mean the people who would have been employed thus have ceased to exist or have been made redundant.

Fast food is a form of having servants isn't it. Someone cooks and serves the food for you, even delivers it your door on a moped. Maybe it will all go the same way as the servants.

I never thought I'd be so rich as to have so many servants!

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The thesis is that people will generally be reallocated to other areas of the workforce which are harder or less profitable to automate.

It's odd to me that people in the field of robotics and AI seem to have a problem dealing with the reality that an exponential function will- if given enough time- inevitably overtake a linear function- even if that linear function has a really good head start in the race.

Odd because I'm sure that if you asked them if their field will continue to advance into the foreseeable future they would say yes.

So in world were AI improves constantly while the average man remains -well- average- the question really is not if most average people will wind up one day competing with AI for a job- the question is surely only when that might occur.

I suspect they do get this but are genuinely nervous that a negative view of their work might become a problem, so prefer to play down the degree to which what they do represents a real threat to the jobs of a lot of people.

Edited by wonderpup

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It's odd to me that people in the field of robotics and AI seem to have a problem dealing with the reality that an exponential function will- if given enough time- inevitably overtake a linear function- even if that linear function has a really good head start in the race.

Odd because I'm sure that if you asked them if their field will continue to advance into the foreseeable future they would say yes.

So in world were AI improves constantly while the average man remains -well- average- the question really is not if most average people will wind up one day competing with AI for a job- the question is surely only when that might occur.

I suspect they do get this but are genuinely nervous that a negative view of their work might become a problem, so prefer to play down the degree to which what they do represents a real threat to the jobs of a lot of people.

Hmm.

I was a student in Manhattan in 1988 and worked under union rules as a contract cleaner on night shift in a dental training hospital on east avenue. We had no work to do - summer break for the dental students - but earned $500 a week. It was great compensation for being bored and tired, and it covered the rent in Little Italy + pizza.

There's always money to be skimmed, just a question of the right associations.

Nothing to stop people joining unions, or even making unions. I recognise it's very difficult for the indebted/self-employed, but so frustrating to seem them fail to make any farking demands. A weird refutation of Norman Tebbit.

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It's been a while since Peter Schiff had a rant on this forum

Yeah..... whatever..... Kleptocratic elitist who's busy sucking up the wealth everyone else makes, rants that those he's stealing wealth from have too much and should make do with less.

Back in the real world....

The average age of workers in the fast-food industry in the U.S. is 32. So it's not an entry level job as he presumes.

60% of the jobs created in the U.S. since 2008 are in low wage sectors or pay wages comparable to those sectors. So the higher paying jobs which he thinks they should "upskill" to don't exist either.

Edited by alexw

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Nothing to stop people joining unions, or even making unions. I recognise it's very difficult for the indebted/self-employed, but so frustrating to seem them fail to make any farking demands. A weird refutation of Norman Tebbit.

Actually if Fast Food Nation is to be believed, McDonalds does stop its workers joining unions. The branch that signed up got closed, and then McDonalds opened a new branch down the road from the old one and only rehired the workers that hadnt joined the union.

google books link to relevant page

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It's odd to me that people in the field of robotics and AI seem to have a problem dealing with the reality that an exponential function will- if given enough time- inevitably overtake a linear function- even if that linear function has a really good head start in the race.

Odd because I'm sure that if you asked them if their field will continue to advance into the foreseeable future they would say yes.

So in world were AI improves constantly while the average man remains -well- average- the question really is not if most average people will wind up one day competing with AI for a job- the question is surely only when that might occur.

I suspect they do get this but are genuinely nervous that a negative view of their work might become a problem, so prefer to play down the degree to which what they do represents a real threat to the jobs of a lot of people.

The interesting thing is that the natural reaction to the problem would be..

- Shorten the working week

- Increase minimum wage / introduce a Citizen's Income

- Increase the amount of free education available (including mid-life/career)

- Lower the retirement age.

All of which would act to share the remaining work out. Eventually you'd transition to an almost communist society (communism works a lot better when robots do all the work, where work is defined as 'something you have to be paid to do').

Of course, this means that the owners of the robots have to pay more and more of their income in tax - trending to 100% as their labour costs fall to zero. This is where the problems start..

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Guest eight

The interesting thing is that the natural reaction to the problem would be..

- Shorten the working week

- Increase minimum wage / introduce a Citizen's Income

- Increase the amount of free education available (including mid-life/career)

- Lower the retirement age.

All of which would act to share the remaining work out. Eventually you'd transition to an almost communist society (communism works a lot better when robots do all the work, where work is defined as 'something you have to be paid to do').

Of course, this means that the owners of the robots have to pay more and more of their income in tax - trending to 100% as their labour costs fall to zero. This is where the problems start..

This is a seriously good post.

We have a problem in that working excessively long hours, working for very low pay (or even for free) or working very physically hard are somehow all seen as virtuous. Yet they're actually all a bit anti-social - you're effectively stealing somebody else's share of the available work pie.

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Of course, this means that the owners of the robots have to pay more and more of their income in tax

The way things work is that as their share of the wealth grows so does their political clout- so the more extreme the wealth divide becomes, the less likely anything will be done to fix it.

History seems to indicate a ruling elite finds it impossible to reverse it's tendency to loot the system- a process that only stops when the system itself fails due to the imbalances caused by the looting.

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Let's see:

1. Easily-replaced workers demanding doubling of wages.

2. Artificially low interest rates making capital investment cheap.

What do you think is going to happen?

Hint: there's at least one company developing burger-making machines right now.

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The interesting thing is that the natural reaction to the problem would be..

- Shorten the working week

- Increase minimum wage / introduce a Citizen's Income

- Increase the amount of free education available (including mid-life/career)

- Lower the retirement age.

All of which would act to share the remaining work out. Eventually you'd transition to an almost communist society (communism works a lot better when robots do all the work, where work is defined as 'something you have to be paid to do').

Of course, this means that the owners of the robots have to pay more and more of their income in tax - trending to 100% as their labour costs fall to zero. This is where the problems start..

That post should be posted on the ' How would you fix the UK?' thread.......after all there are so many jobs that are being done and being paid for as if they were a job when in fact the work could be made quite easily into two jobs or no job at all.....that person could be growing some vegetables or sitting in the garden and nobody would be any the worse off for it or perhaps not even noticing the 'paid for job' that is not really a job was not being done. ;)

Edited by winkie

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