Jump to content
House Price Crash Forum

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

Ill_handle_it

Spanish Rail Crash Bumped By Baby Name On Bbc News At 10Pm

Recommended Posts

http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2013/jul/24/spain-train-crash

At least 45 people were killed and 70 injured when a train derailed on the outskirts of the northern Spanish city of Santiago de Compostela on Wednesday in one of Europe's worst rail disasters.

Bodies covered in blankets lay next to the overturned carriages as smoke billowed from the wreckage. Firemen clambered over the twisted metal trying to get survivors out of the windows.

The government said it was working on the hypothesis the derailment was an accident – though the scene will stir memories of 2004's Madrid train bombing, carried out by Islamists, that killed 191 people.

The train operated by state rail company Renfe with 247 people on board derailed on the eve of the ancient city's main festival when thousands of Christian pilgrims travel in to pack the streets.

"It was going so quickly … It seems that on a curve the train started to twist, and the wagons piled up one on top of the other," passenger Ricardo Montesco told Cadena Ser radio station.

"A lot of people were squashed on the bottom. We tried to squeeze out of the bottom of the wagons to get out and we realised the train was burning … I was in the second wagon and there was fire … I saw corpses," he added.

One witness near the scene told the radio station she heard an explosion before seeing the derailed train.

Prime Minister Mariano Rajoy, who was born in Santiago de Compostela, held an emergency meeting with his ministers. He would visit the site on Thursday morning, his spokeswoman added.

The head of the surrounding Galicia region, Alberto Nunez Feijoo, said at least 45 people were killed and round 70 injured, more than 20 of them seriously.

"The scene is shocking, it's Dante-esque," he said in a radio interview.

The train was travelling from Madrid to Ferrol on the Galician coast when it derailed, state train company Renfe said in a statement.

The crash happened a day before the city's main festival focused on St James, one of Jesus's 12 disciples whose remains are said to rest in the city.

The apostle's shrine there is the destination of the famous El Camino de Santiago pilgrimage, followed by Christians since the Middle Ages.

The derailment happened less than two weeks after six people died when a train came off the tracks and hit the platform at a station in central France.

That accident may have been caused by a loose steel plate at a junction, French train operator SNCF said.

It was one of the worst rail accidents in Europe over the past 25 years.

In November 2000, 155 people were killed when a fire in a tunnel engulfed a funicular train packed with skiers in Austria.

In Montenegro, up to 46 people were killed and nearly 200 injured in 2006 when a packed train derailed and plunged into a ravine outside the capital Podgorica.

The BBC News at 10pm ran with the lead story of the "royal baby" being named George Alexander Louis. However, at least 45 people were killed in a disaster which took place at 8:24pm. The train wreck ran as second story.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2013/jul/24/spain-train-crash

The BBC News at 10pm ran with the lead story of the "royal baby" being named George Alexander Louis. However, at least 45 people were killed in a disaster which took place at 8:24pm. The train wreck ran as second story.

I guess someone had to make a decision on the lead story some time before 10pm, so less than 90 minutes after the accident occurred. It wouldn't have been an easy call.

But on the other hand, the BBC do seem to be firmly of the opinion that the entire world is obsessed with this ******ing baby. I'm surprised we haven't been treated to pictures of the Royal nappy yet.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest eight

The BBC News at 10pm ran with the lead story of the "royal baby" being named George Alexander Louis. However, at least 45 people were killed in a disaster which took place at 8:24pm. The train wreck ran as second story.

If it had indeed turned out to be terrorism the BBC would have been all over it. The fact it was just an accident means that 77 deaths are neither here nor there, compared to the new arrival.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Why are either of these events considered "news"? Neither of them will have any impact on the way you or anybody you know lives. The vast majority of what passes for news is just a series of things that grab your attention but carry no useful information, just like a fictional TV show.

Neil Postman writes about this in his book Amusing Ourselves to Death.

The great thing about HPC is that a much higher proportion of the news that makes it onto here is relevant to the lives of the people who are reading it. Many/most of us encounter problems in our own lives due to the UK's dysfunctional property market so information about it could be useful to us now or in the future.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I guess someone had to make a decision on the lead story some time before 10pm, so less than 90 minutes after the accident occurred. It wouldn't have been an easy call.

I don't think that's a valid excuse when you've got News 24 broadcasting news errrr... 24/7 on another channel by the same broadcaster.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Why are either of these events considered "news"? Neither of them will have any impact on the way you or anybody you know lives. The vast majority of what passes for news is just a series of things that grab your attention but carry no useful information, just like a fictional TV show.

Neil Postman writes about this in his book Amusing Ourselves to Death.

The great thing about HPC is that a much higher proportion of the news that makes it onto here is relevant to the lives of the people who are reading it. Many/most of us encounter problems in our own lives due to the UK's dysfunctional property market so information about it could be useful to us now or in the future.

I have to agree with you.

Do I need to know anything about the royal parasite (don't wish any ill of it but dont agree with hereditary monarchy) and its name? No.

Do I need to know about a train crash in Spain? Does it impact my life in any way? Does it improve my life to hear about it? No.

Why the hell should I watch or read news reports about such things? I only have a short time on earth, why spend my valuable non-work time focusing on such matters. My time is far better spent with my family and actively engaging with my neighbours and local community.

I no longer watch the news or even listen to it on the radio very often. I don't buy newspapers though I will browse a couple of news sites online if I have the spare time whilst working.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I wondered why all the front pages had a baby's face. I had no idea she was expecting. No tv or radio in my life. :)

How ******ing empty and crap does your life have to be to give a solitary flying toss about the "royal family"?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have to agree with you.

Do I need to know anything about the royal parasite (don't wish any ill of it but dont agree with hereditary monarchy) and its name? No.

Do I need to know about a train crash in Spain? Does it impact my life in any way? Does it improve my life to hear about it? No.

Why the hell should I watch or read news reports about such things? I only have a short time on earth, why spend my valuable non-work time focusing on such matters. My time is far better spent with my family and actively engaging with my neighbours and local community.

I no longer watch the news or even listen to it on the radio very often. I don't buy newspapers though I will browse a couple of news sites online if I have the spare time whilst working.

The baby is of no interest.

The train crash however - do you never use public transport? We have a need to know about bad train/ship/air/road accidents, to find out why they happened, to assess our own personal risks when we travel. however, we don't need the media to wallow in a feeding frenzy of false sympathy with pictures of grieving relatives. That's one part of MSM news reporting that really makes me churn.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The train crash however - do you never use public transport? We have a need to know about bad train/ship/air/road accidents, to find out why they happened, to assess our own personal risks when we travel.

Were you unaware before this that train crashes happen? After this one in Spain did you sit down and redo your sums and think "gosh, this bumps up the death rate from 0.88 per billion passenger miles to 0.89, better walk everywhere from now on"?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I wondered why all the front pages had a baby's face. I had no idea she was expecting. No tv or radio in my life. :)

How ******ing empty and crap does your life have to be to give a solitary flying toss about the "royal family"?

Cutting out broadcast media is one of the best things you can do to increase your quality of life.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Why are either of these events considered "news"? Neither of them will have any impact on the way you or anybody you know lives. The vast majority of what passes for news is just a series of things that grab your attention but carry no useful information, just like a fictional TV show.

Neil Postman writes about this in his book Amusing Ourselves to Death.

The great thing about HPC is that a much higher proportion of the news that makes it onto here is relevant to the lives of the people who are reading it. Many/most of us encounter problems in our own lives due to the UK's dysfunctional property market so information about it could be useful to us now or in the future.

rubber necking is todays reality for many....A baby that will have no impact on anyones wellbeing today, a train crash, the big brother house, who wins X Factor....all irrelevent

meanwhile, US "parliament" votes to keep surveillance on its own citizens, the UK government out of thin air pushes to block sections of the Internet, bankers aim to trash the £ in yor pocket....things that WILL affect you adversely, and because there is no remote control over this, people do or say nothing...indeed, best not to care.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Journalistic ego and need for high salaries. Journos took over the BBC during the era of Birt and it has never been the same. Hence why we now have journos dominating so many shows from what passes as documentaries through to light entertainment.

As for the news content, I think watching UK news daily can make you depressed and ill - it is so negative.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So you'd all rather the news only told you what you what they decided you need to know. OK... Personally I thought that it's job was just to say what was going on (which they stray beyond far too often but that's a different issue).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So you'd all rather the news only told you what you what they decided you need to know. OK... Personally I thought that it's job was just to say what was going on (which they stray beyond far too often but that's a different issue).

It seems much of the news is either press releases or talking points.

or journos talking to journos talking to journos.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Deeply frustrating when you realise how useless the News is that they serve us. Frankly, I think the whole Syria reporting debacle has led many people to this realisation. That it wasn't news to them personally, that it was incessant night after night, that lots of this stuff is going on all over the place (e.g. the Congo), so the question that arises was "what is it there for?"....and I think many people correctly concluded that it was part of a long softening up process as a prelude to direct physical intervention. Unfortunately for the politicos, they never managed to tilt the polls in favour of action at any stage and even said as such, blaming Labour's Iraq debacle.

Whilst I agree with what you are saying, in that example, coverage of the meddling in Syria could serve a useful purpose and let us know what's been done in our name with our money. There is an argument for international news, just not biased international news.

Three books come to mind which cover different aspects of the useless, sometimes plain dangerous nature of corporate news...

Amusing Ourselves to Death is a well-written, funny book, already discussed

Flat Earth News is a well-written, not especially funny book, on the death of investigative journalism and the rise of reporting by press release

Manufacturing Consent is a slog, on the propaganda model of corporate reporting bias

The long OT thread on the George Zimmerman trial is stuffed full of examples of bent reporting and attempts to manufacture consent.

The long OT thread on government imposing filters on the internet is one huge example of what's on the cards, now that the internet is making it harder to lie us into wars and witch hunts.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So you'd all rather the news only told you what you what they decided you need to know.

Erm, if you watch the evening news or read a newspaper that's exactly what you're getting. Somebody at the BBC or News International decided which stories to run today. They also decided which information you didn't need to know. Still, I'm sure they have your best interests at heart.

If you make a conscious effort to locate sources of information which are relevant to you then you are the one deciding what you need to know.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Marshall McLuhan famously said 'the medium is the message'.

By it's nature watching a broadcast TV news bulletin is a pre-packaged, passive experience.

Contrast that, say, with sitting at a browser and clicking all round the shop. Potentially at least, there is a lot more scope to be thinking about what you're being told, to check out sources and opposing points of view.

TPTB would impo clearly prefer using the Internet to be as much like watching television as possible.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest eight

Marshall McLuhan famously said 'the medium is the message'.

By it's nature watching a broadcast TV news bulletin is a pre-packaged, passive experience.

Contrast that, say, with sitting at a browser and clicking all round the shop. Potentially at least, there is a lot more scope to be thinking about what you're being told, to check out sources and opposing points of view.

TPTB would impo would clearly prefer using the Internet to be as much like watching television as possible.

I think that's what bugs me so much about tablets and the Windows 8 style browsers now appearing. No keyboard, no need for a keyboard, no need for a browser, all popular websites in the form of a pre-installed app. Consumption tools, nothing more.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think that's what bugs me so much about tablets and the Windows 8 style browsers now appearing. No keyboard, no need for a keyboard, no need for a browser, all popular websites in the form of a pre-installed app. Consumption tools, nothing more.

I don't think that's accidental. It's systemic.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Were you unaware before this that train crashes happen? After this one in Spain did you sit down and redo your sums and think "gosh, this bumps up the death rate from 0.88 per billion passenger miles to 0.89, better walk everywhere from now on"?

Strawman.

What if there were a number of train crashes, and they seemed to have common link - let's say the adoption of lower standards of track maintenance because of budgetary contraints. Would you prefer the crashes or investigations weren't reported, whilst you happily carried on using what you thought was a safe mode of transport? Or would you perhaps think that it might be prudent to avoid that train maker/operator/route until the causes were understood?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Strawman.

What if there were a number of train crashes, and they seemed to have common link - let's say the adoption of lower standards of track maintenance because of budgetary contraints. Would you prefer the crashes or investigations weren't reported, whilst you happily carried on using what you thought was a safe mode of transport? Or would you perhaps think that it might be prudent to avoid that train maker/operator/route until the causes were understood?

...or how about if the Dreamliner problems, or the Fukushima issues weren't reported? "well, we'll just sweep any problems under the carpet..."

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Strawman.

What if there were a number of train crashes, and they seemed to have common link - let's say the adoption of lower standards of track maintenance because of budgetary contraints. Would you prefer the crashes or investigations weren't reported, whilst you happily carried on using what you thought was a safe mode of transport? Or would you perhaps think that it might be prudent to avoid that train maker/operator/route until the causes were understood?

I'm very happy for all of these things to be reported, and for people who have some particular connection with or interest in the field of public transport to chew over the details as we do for house prices on here. If they hit upon a significant reoccurring problem then I'm pretty sure I'm casting my net wide enough that I'd have a good chance of hearing about it.

What I'm not interested in is being bothered by every little datapoint. We all know that train crashes happen at a certain rate due to mechanical failure or human error. Also I might drop a saucepan of boiling water on my foot, I might trip over and crack my head open, I might choke on a fishbone. Should I spend every moment of every day worrying about a million rare events that might happen to me for no significant reason? Doesn't seem like that would be very good for my mental health or my ability to identify and deal with problems I might actually be able to do something about.

So, since you seem so concerned about this Spanish train crash, have you looked up who made the train and will you use this information to plan journeys in future? Because if not, it seems like you are admonishing me for saying a report of one crash is not particularly useful information while not making use of it yourself.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Erm, if you watch the evening news or read a newspaper that's exactly what you're getting. Somebody at the BBC or News International decided which stories to run today. They also decided which information you didn't need to know. Still, I'm sure they have your best interests at heart.

If you make a conscious effort to locate sources of information which are relevant to you then you are the one deciding what you need to know.

No, they aren't deciding what you need to know. They're deciding what they can make a story out of and so on. There's very rarely anything that happens anywhere that you need to know that's remotely newsworthy to most other people; traffic news is about as close as it gets. You say I don't need to know about a train crash in Spain, I don't need to know about a train crash anywhere unless I'm planning a train journey or have reason to think someone I know was on it (and the chance of that in a random event anywhere is vanishingly small).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

...or how about if the Dreamliner problems, or the Fukushima issues weren't reported? "well, we'll just sweep any problems under the carpet..."

Some of the arguments I've heard on here suggest that Fukushima shouldn't have been reported because why do we need to know about some Japanese reactors? In this case you could make an argument about nuclear power in general, in which case it should've at best been the only thing we heard about and the rest of the earthquake and tsunami wasn't stuff we should've been told.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • 239 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.