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Gudz

Bbc Propaganda Machine

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This forum has taught me a lot in recent times, the nature of market cycles, how and where to invest my hard earned cash, and how to sound the mighty troll call "AWOOOGA!" but one thing above all else stands out and it's not to trust Nu Labours spin machine "the BBC".

Just had a look through the news blog, and it's laughable!

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/business/4263852.stm

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/business/4442086.stm

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/business/4437632.stm

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/business/4438226.stm

How more obvious can the BBC get before people actually start wising up to the fact that their primary purpose these days is to release good news only, aimed at reassuring the general population. I can't remember the last bit of bearish economic news I heard from the Beeb! There's definately been a lot recently elsewhere!

They've finally lost what last bit of repect I had for them as an impartial and informative source of economic news. Scrap the Licence fee I say, and let em die - Even Rupert M. is more inpartial and that's saying something!

I'm now thinking that I'm better off reading a BBC article from an objective stand-point, and asking myself the question "Why would the government be trying to reassure me about this subject?" I can then quickly deduce that the BBC article is in fact identifying the governments concerns and in many times the opposite is actually true.

Sry - needed that whinge.

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I think this is just the way that financial industry reporting works.

I work for "Company X" (in case im accused of advertising) - a company that supplies insurance quotes to IFA's through a website.

Whenever we have a story to tell (new product or partnership with another company etc..) our marketing company puts together a bulletin to send out to all of their contacts in the financial press.

This bulletin is two pages. Page one is the story we want printed and includes quotes from our managing director, me and other colleagues (if we developed the product). Page 2 is always "10 facts about Company X" which has things like :

1. Company X was the first company to provide online insurance quotes in the UK

2. Company X has increased doubled its customer base in two years

3. Company X provided its 20 millionth quote on 2/4/05

etc

The journo's (if interested or no better story around) just take all this information and put it in a story ala:

"Company X, the first provider of online quotes in the UK, has teamed up with Company Y to provide a new product. 'This will provide our customers with far better service' said Mr. A, Managing Director. Having increased their customer base two fold over the last two years......." etc

No reporter ever phones to challenge anything we say. They just sit on their fat arses and report what we tell them.

Through seeing my own quotes appear in the financial press, I've realised that most of the other quotes in other stories have the same value as mine. They are all biased, uninvestigated opinion.

In my opinion, reporting is dead, in all areas, except when concerned with the sex/drug lives of footballers or the latest washed up celebs on the latest reality tv show.

It's just too much like hard work to find the truth that noone wants to hear.

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One positive note on the BBC VI FTB article is that it advises FTBs to knock 5-10% off the asking price. True, but isn't being an FTB worth 10% off anyway plus the normal 10%?

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Agreed, the problem is not journalistic bias, just simple laziness.

As far as I can see most of the BBCs output on house prices is simply a cut and paste of whatever press release they have been handed by the VIs. Since no similar releases come from the other side only the VIs story tends to get reported.

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I think this is just the way that financial industry reporting works.

I work for "Company X" (in case im accused of advertising) - a company that supplies insurance quotes to IFA's through a website.

Whenever we have a story to tell (new product or partnership with another company etc..) our marketing company puts together a bulletin to send out to all of their contacts in the financial press.

This bulletin is two pages. Page one is the story we want printed and includes quotes from our managing director, me and other colleagues (if we developed the product). Page 2 is always "10 facts about Company X" which has things like :

1. Company X was the first company to provide online insurance quotes in the UK

2. Company X has increased doubled its customer base in two years

3. Company X provided its 20 millionth quote on 2/4/05

etc

The journo's (if interested or no better story around) just take all this information and put it in a story ala:

"Company X, the first provider of online quotes in the UK, has teamed up with Company Y to provide a new product. 'This will provide our customers with far better service' said Mr. A, Managing Director. Having increased their customer base two fold over the last two years......." etc

No reporter ever phones to challenge anything we say. They just sit on their fat arses and report what we tell them.

Through seeing my own quotes appear in the financial press, I've realised that most of the other quotes in other stories have the same value as mine. They are all biased, uninvestigated opinion.

In my opinion, reporting is dead, in all areas, except when concerned with the sex/drug lives of footballers or the latest washed up celebs on the latest reality tv show.

It's just too much like hard work to find the truth that noone wants to hear.

I agree. Over the years, I have had articles on new insurance products printed virtually verbatim in the FT, Times, Mail, Wall St Journal, NY Times and elsewhere mostly because the journos are too lazy (and often ignorant) to do any better or even ask any searching questions...

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Frank Fields (labour) MP was on breaky news and said that labour had only put the stuff out about csa to distract from the pensions news (Or is it the other way round) Anyway he was openly admiting that labour were trying to hide/ignore stuff.

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I saw a particularly shameless story from the BBC last week:

New media 'help toddlers learn'

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/education/4403224.stm

This 'story' was a survey commisioned by the BBC which showed that parents think that TV is good for their children.

I presume this is attempting to get back at research last month in which scientists proved that childrens programming with fast editing damages brain development, leading to attention problems.

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  • 301 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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