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While I was writing the post on Kirstie's Fill Your House programme, I found myself wondering if HPCers are hoarders or quite the opposite.

Our house is rather UNcluttered, and, if anything, we're getting less cluttered over the years: books off to the charity shop, DVDs up for second-hand sale, and so on. There's also quite a resistance to acquiring new junk (and not just because of the cost).

I imagine that, although this relatively simple, uncluttered approach--somewhat anti-consumerist--is not especially common, that it would be a lot more common among the people on here: more Bohemian types here than in the general population, and more in rental accommodation also who want to remain more lightweight... more 'throw the lumber over, man' in the words of Jerome K. Jerome.

Anyway, hoarder or not?

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While I was writing the post on Kirstie's Fill Your House programme, I found myself wondering if HPCers are hoarders or quite the opposite.

Our house is rather UNcluttered, and, if anything, we're getting less cluttered over the years: books off to the charity shop, DVDs up for second-hand sale, and so on. There's also quite a resistance to acquiring new junk (and not just because of the cost).

I imagine that, although this relatively simple, uncluttered approach--somewhat anti-consumerist--is not especially common, that it would be a lot more common among the people on here: more Bohemian types here than in the general population, and more in rental accommodation also who want to remain more lightweight... more 'throw the lumber over, man' in the words of Jerome K. Jerome.

Anyway, hoarder or not?

I wanted to answer minimalist but had to change it to balanced when I remembered my shoe cupboard.

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I was a hoarder but i realised the junk i had was junk, and god rid. My other half has lots of stuff she will not let go, she manages to attach sentiment ro every innaminate object she owns, and this makss it difficult to let go.

I'm trying to go digital with everything, i can stream video and music to any device in the house, and we both have Kobos, but she will not get rid of her 500 book collection, 300 DVD collection and 400 CD collection. This is not taking into account her VHS videos and Audio Tapes that we do have have the ability to play any more. she has replaced fhe DVDs she want to keed with Blu-Ray And its not the case of "we have the space so whats the problem?" As we dont. All of this in in boxed in the hall and living room as there is no where to put them. Thats where they got stacked 18months ago when we moved in...........

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slight hoarder - but have realised this and am getting rid of stuff week-by-week.

the only 'stuff' I have now, but don't really need is my books (keeping those) and my cd's (probably keep) - am gradually getting rid of everything else - clothes, kitchen stuff, furniture etc

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I was a hoarder but i realised the junk i had was junk, and god rid. My other half has lots of stuff she will not let go, she manages to attach sentiment ro every innaminate object she owns, and this makss it difficult to let go.

I'm trying to go digital with everything, i can stream video and music to any device in the house, and we both have Kobos, but she will not get rid of her 500 book collection, 300 DVD collection and 400 CD collection. This is not taking into account her VHS videos and Audio Tapes that we do have have the ability to play any more. she has replaced fhe DVDs she want to keed with Blu-Ray And its not the case of "we have the space so whats the problem?" As we dont. All of this in in boxed in the hall and living room as there is no where to put them. Thats where they got stacked 18months ago when we moved in...........

This pretty much sums up my situation, but still have regular cupboard clear-outs. I think the first step was getting rid of my ancient 18-hole DM's! once I binned those, I realised that nothing was sacred :lol:

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This pretty much sums up my situation, but still have regular cupboard clear-outs. I think the first step was getting rid of my ancient 18-hole DM's! once I binned those, I realised that nothing was sacred :lol:

Oh you should have put those on Ebay (says he who has still has his)

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I'm a hoarder. I do not think my hoarding is a problem, the problem is a lack of space.

I've 47Sqm of flat, 45 Sqm of loft space, 100Sqm of allotment land. I have a couple of sheds dotted about, access to some other houses and garages and what not, hoping to get a garage of my own soon, and then another, also double my allotment land. Housing wise, I'm going to have to see about buying in the not too distant future I suppose. I could really do with an industrial unit too.

Got my eye on a few acres of agricultural land nearby as well.

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I'm a hoarder. I do not think my hoarding is a problem, the problem is a lack of space.

I've 47Sqm of flat, 45 Sqm of loft space, 100Sqm of allotment land. I have a couple of sheds dotted about, access to some other houses and garages and what not, hoping to get a garage of my own soon, and then another, also double my allotment land. Housing wise, I'm going to have to see about buying in the not too distant future I suppose. I could really do with an industrial unit too.

Got my eye on a few acres of agricultural land nearby as well.

Woods have been selling like hot cakes......to the rich/wealthy I would presume could be because of all the tax benefits it offers them......the rich get richer because they are paying a far less percentage in tax than the poor who pay the most. ;)

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I grade old newspapers according to what I've used them for (cleaning glass, paint brushes, absorbing spillage etc), likewise rag, bits of wood ...

Don't think I'm materialistic though. I hate buying stuff (for me). Recently threw away my last 31'6d shirt.

Result is, inevitably, I'm drowning in junk. Expect to see me on the telly soon ...

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I grade old newspapers according to what I've used them for (cleaning glass, paint brushes, absorbing spillage etc), likewise rag, bits of wood ...

Don't think I'm materialistic though. I hate buying stuff (for me). Recently threw away my last 31'6d shirt.

Result is, inevitably, I'm drowning in junk. Expect to see me on the telly soon ...

Judging by your avatar and the link I posted, you and Batman should just get a room already...

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While I was writing the post on Kirstie's Fill Your House programme, I found myself wondering if HPCers are hoarders or quite the opposite.

Our house is rather UNcluttered, and, if anything, we're getting less cluttered over the years: books off to the charity shop, DVDs up for second-hand sale, and so on. There's also quite a resistance to acquiring new junk (and not just because of the cost).

I imagine that, although this relatively simple, uncluttered approach--somewhat anti-consumerist--is not especially common, that it would be a lot more common among the people on here: more Bohemian types here than in the general population, and more in rental accommodation also who want to remain more lightweight... more 'throw the lumber over, man' in the words of Jerome K. Jerome.

Anyway, hoarder or not?

For every item I chuck out my Mrs buys another one. We're balanced overall but, at some point, I'm going to wake up to find out that my last possessions are a toothbrush and a pair of underpants.

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Wrong character:

D-d-d-danger ...

How odd! I missed that too, despite having quite a lot of SAHB on vinyl! :blink:

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Something weird happened to me when I discovered eBay. I used to discard 'things' after a while and was a terrible wastrel.

After spending loads on extensions we decided to furnish on great quality but second hand furniture only on eBay ( or jumble sales, car boots etc)

The fact that we tracked items, researched their real market price ( or equivalent new price) and then had the excitement of trying to 'win' the auctions, then followed by early hours long journeys to pick up etc suddenly created a ' bond' of some sort with the items.

I'm completely unpractical as a craftsman so putting other 'efforts' in gave me much more satisfaction of ownership so I actually 'love' these items and care and respect them more than if I'd had done impulsive soulless purchasing experience.

Added to that was the joy of knowing you'd saved . We bought a nearly new dresser for £200 that was still retailing in the sane branded store for £600. We spent done of the 'savings' ( our max bid was £300 ) on a family treat meal . The whole day was pretty meaningless to the rest of the world but for us it was a lovely satisfying day and ill probably hoard that item forever .

Weird and illogical but special to us and I still have fond memories of that day, especially as I spent the day cleaning the item whilst listening to uninterrupted test match special all day . Good times .

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Something weird happened to me when I discovered eBay. I used to discard 'things' after a while and was a terrible wastrel.

After spending loads on extensions we decided to furnish on great quality but second hand furniture only on eBay ( or jumble sales, car boots etc)

The fact that we tracked items, researched their real market price ( or equivalent new price) and then had the excitement of trying to 'win' the auctions, then followed by early hours long journeys to pick up etc suddenly created a ' bond' of some sort with the items.

I'm completely unpractical as a craftsman so putting other 'efforts' in gave me much more satisfaction of ownership so I actually 'love' these items and care and respect them more than if I'd had done impulsive soulless purchasing experience.

Added to that was the joy of knowing you'd saved . We bought a nearly new dresser for £200 that was still retailing in the sane branded store for £600. We spent done of the 'savings' ( our max bid was £300 ) on a family treat meal . The whole day was pretty meaningless to the rest of the world but for us it was a lovely satisfying day and ill probably hoard that item forever .

Weird and illogical but special to us and I still have fond memories of that day, especially as I spent the day cleaning the item whilst listening to uninterrupted test match special all day . Good times .

I've noticed that furniture is almost as faddy as clothing. Not quite perhaps because it's more expensive. I recall, for example, those kind of dining chairs that had extremely long backs to them that went down to the floor. They seemed to be the in thing maybe five or ten years ago? (Maybe someone who follows furniture fashions would know better how long ago this was.)

When we buy items of furniture of one sort or another (which is almost never), we tend to consider it as if it's a once-in-a-lifetime purchase. It probably isn't--furniture doesn't last forever--but it means we buy solid, non-fashionable stuff that we really like. This has mostly turned out to be sturdy wooden stuff (unpainted and minimally treated) which gives our place a certain approximate coordination without specifically giving a monkeys about how this piecemeal collection would look when employed in close proximity.

Due to the choosing, and how long these items tend to hang around in our lives, there is certainly a certain fondness for them. This isn't unusual for me--it happens the same way for items of clothing, footwear and so on too. Owning an item of clothing (that's used frequently) for fifteen years isn't especially unusual for me.

I'm a scarecrow and proud. :)

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Nearly two thirds of HPCers who responded are reducing the amount of stuff they have in their houses or are pretty much staying the same. If I had to guess, I would've imagined there were more than about 35% of the general population who are accumulating, so maybe HPCers are unusual in that respect (and possibly many other respects... :D )

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A general minimalist thwarted at every turn by my wife's mates, who are (it seems) determined to furnish our house with trinkets/tat every birthday/christmas. It is acutely annoying to have to surreptitiously dispose of gifts which are essentially landfill to start with, and they all know it, but for some reason just cannot stop buying it for each other.

The arrogance in assuming that others' tastes are identical to your own is the most irksome bit.

I only buy people consumable gifts- tasty, then it's a pleasant memory. I wish they'd move to a similar view.

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How is it possible not to hoard? If you have a car, you'll typically have a few tools, equipment and bottles of 'stuff' associated with it. Have a computer and by the time you consider a printer, a camera, discs, memory cards, leads, other peripherals etc you have a load of 'stuff'. Like to listen to music or play ideo games? You'll likely have a few boxes that do that for you. Need to fix things around the home? Well you'll need a little more than a swiss army knife to do it justice. Even an innocent hobby or sporting interest can accumulate masses of things. And don't get me started on children. Always needing more stuff, clothes, toys etc. There's stuff everywhere.

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How is it possible not to hoard? If you have a car, you'll typically have a few tools, equipment and bottles of 'stuff' associated with it. Have a computer and by the time you consider a printer, a camera, discs, memory cards, leads, other peripherals etc you have a load of 'stuff'. Like to listen to music or play ideo games? You'll likely have a few boxes that do that for you. Need to fix things around the home? Well you'll need a little more than a swiss army knife to do it justice. Even an innocent hobby or sporting interest can accumulate masses of things. And don't get me started on children. Always needing more stuff, clothes, toys etc. There's stuff everywhere.

If you're 16 years old and own practically nothing, 'hoarding' is pretty much inevitable unless you decide on a life of bare subsistence in a cave. But even if said 16 year old embarks on a more orthodox lifestyle, after they've acquired a reasonable quantity of useful stuff, why isn't it possible NOT to hoard?

Edited by Ologhai Jones

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How is it possible not to hoard? If you have a car, you'll typically have a few tools, equipment and bottles of 'stuff' associated with it.

I've personally got enough spare parts squirreled away to rebuild our car twice over.

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  • 238 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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