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Ford Shuts Down Uk Plants


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Now the wretched Japanese are being used to blackmail us into staying in the EU. dry.gif

"The UK, as a champion of free trade, is a reliable partner for Japan. More than 1,300 Japanese companies have invested in the UK, as part of the single market of the EU, and have created 130,000 jobs, more than anywhere else in Europe.

"This fact demonstrates that the advantage of the UK as a gateway to the European market has attracted Japanese investment."

Ed Conway@EdConwaySky 3h I vividly remember a Japanese car CEO telling us that they might shut down UK factories if UK didn't join the euro. It didn't happen

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Now the wretched Japanese are being used to blackmail us into staying in the EU. dry.gif

"The UK, as a champion of free trade, is a reliable partner for Japan. More than 1,300 Japanese companies have invested in the UK, as part of the single market of the EU, and have created 130,000 jobs, more than anywhere else in Europe.

"This fact demonstrates that the advantage of the UK as a gateway to the European market has attracted Japanese investment."

They still lie, dont they...the single market IS NOT the EU.

The EEC was the single market. UKIP even was for that...UKIP was only formed after maastrict because the EU is NOT a single market, it is a POLITICAL UNION.

There are provisions within the EU to ensure that the UK can exit the EU and remain IN the SINGLE MARKET.

Dont know why people view the Torygraph as euroskeptic. It is clear from their reporting and lies that they support full integration and removal of national sovereignty.

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The UK motor vehicle industry does indeed have an export surplus but it is £8m compared to 1.9bn in royalties and licence fees according to ed Conway who says he got his data from the ons.

40% of our net exports are financial. Cars in percentage terms is zero.

I remember reading they provide misinformation about the great UK motor manufacturing revival. There is only a surplus in finished products. If every stage of production is added, there is a deficit, just as in every other area.

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Meanwhile many of those of us who were wary of buying a home during house price househyperboom 1.0, then the stimulus reflation, still renting, whilst house prices at ludicrous valuations.

Still hearing excuses how it was nothing to do with borrowers and their eagerness for debt to keep on paying higher prices, because it doubles every few years, not enough houses being built, 'only wanted a home'.

Printing yes, but if it's causing negative economic feedback in hidden ways that may lead back to the crash, then that's ok with me.

Are you a tenant, because it sounds like you're a cosy older owner. The tragedy is many of us are still renting, and house prices have seen a raft or measures to see them supported for VI owners. It was only yesterday someone on HPC was showing me how Help-To-Buy could be a solution for me to buy a house, when he's got a large expensive home mostly paid off and over £100K in savings.

That's the tragedy. Property owners who've been sitting pretty and not known much by any of the stress during the boom or during the reflation, wanting younger people to sacrifice themselves for older owners and the reckless borrowers, claiming we'd all be worse off in a recession with companies or banks folding. Better that for some of us than paying high rents and watching all the malivestors keep their gains.

My point is that if you don't like the rules of the game it's pointless blaming the players- you need to look at those who set the rules. I'm sure that some people took on big mortgages with the thought that they might profit from HPI- but a lot more felt they had no choice if they did not want to be 'left behind'.

What I do know is this- if the bankers had chosen to direct the capital they had available toward genuine wealth creating enterprises instead of using it to inflate a housing bubble we would all be better off.

So yes- we can blame the borrowers and we can blame the central banks- but which group of people justify their entire existence based on their skills in the socially useful deployment of capital?

That would be the bankers. We gave them the power to both create credit and manage our societies capital- and in return they gave us an epic housing bubble and a second great depression. They got to be rich- we got to be poor.

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I used to live in Southampton some years ago! I remember trains loaded up with new Transit vans. What a pity I will now have to go to Turkey, to see such wonders of nature! :blink:

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So,

The answer is high import tariffs?

No, Germany has had the answer all along.

You sign up to lots of free trade agreements, then you make it so eye-wateringly expensive for profitable companies to shut factories in your country that the multinationals don't - and they shut factories everywhere else instead...

Your home grown manufacturers like Audi can't afford to compete on price with off-shored Turkish Fords, so they compete on quality and desirability. This eventually creates a halo effect where 'German' has genuine cachet. Britain is filled with people picking up Bosch appliances in their BMW estate, whilst their elderly neighbours wonder who won the war.

Look at American car manufacturing / car industry for the complete opposite. The bosses probably paid the lobbyists to tell the government laying workers off cheap, offshoring jobs etc... would ensure profits, tax revenue, and share income. It probably did, for a year or so.

One of the best examples of why business and politics should be divorced as far as possible?

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High housing costs were caused by lax lending and a structural deficit, not wages. There's a lot of conflating and horse before the cart going on on this thread...

+1

More victim bashing dressed up as basic economics... High wage economy? Please I only have a few ribs left.

And Turkey?! PSML

The cheaper environments you move production to tend to be the more unstable ones. The Japanese are still here for a very good reason, and will prosper well should they hold their nerve and ride this out.

A ford Fiesta for £10k + another £3000 import tariff, or a more reliable better engineered Japanese rival without the import tax?! mmm let me think. That's depending on any Ford factories still standing in some proxy war zone of course.

Edited by PopGun
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For both their most pressing financial issue is the payment of rent on their premises. I've looked into the background of both their landlords, through companies house, and both have an enormous list of charges over their properties all mortgaged from, the usual suspect, state-backed banks.

Bingo.. another example of landlord parasites destroying UK business's sadly backed and egged on by successive spiv governments.

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Guest eight

Your home grown manufacturers like Audi can't afford to compete on price with off-shored Turkish Fords, so they compete on quality and desirability. This eventually creates a halo effect where 'German' has genuine cachet. Britain is filled with people picking up Bosch appliances in their BMW estate, whilst their elderly neighbours wonder who won the war.

Elderly people are the only ones I know who are able to afford BMWs or Bosch appliances.

It's like the number of real crusties you see driving Nissans and Hondas. I bet every single one of them could regale you with tales of horror about what happened to "Our Brian" working on the Burma railway.

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Bingo.. another example of landlord parasites destroying UK business's sadly backed and egged on by successive spiv governments.

Don't forget business rates. A recent survey of small businesses found almost 1 in 7 paid rates equal to or greater than their rent.

Edited by TrevorS
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Last shift at Ford's Transit van factory in Swaythling

Staff at Ford's Transit van factory in Southampton have finished their final shifts as it prepares to close its doors later.

More than 500 workers were based at the Swaythling plant, which has produced two million Transits over 40 years.

Production is moving to Turkey, where costs are "significantly lower" than in western Europe, according to Ford.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-hampshire-23432322

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With any luck we'll be able to sh1tcan Vauxhall soon.

Opel/Vauxhall share of the European market now at an all-time low.

http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424127887324348504578608931345618830.html

EM-AW433_EUCARS_NS_20130716101804.jpg

Good article.

Opel's share of the European car market is hovering around record lows, underscoring how Europe's incumbent mass-market car makers continue to struggle amid a multiyear slump in demand for new cars in the region. The market share of Opel and U.K. sister brand Vauxhall stood at 6.8% in the first half, below their 6.9% share at the end of 2012, representing a steady decline from more than 10% in the years before 2002.

I live about 10 miles from the Ellesmere Port plant, seems like it was given a reprieve recently but moved to a four-day week in October(not sure if still in effect):

http://www.guardian.co.uk/business/2012/oct/10/vuaxhall-four-day-week-ellesmere-port

Seems to be in a very precarious position.

edit wrong interpretation deleted.

Edited by cheeznbreed
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  • 415 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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