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Dave Beans

The £800K Wedge...

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http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2367293/Welcome-wedge-90in-wide-house-expands-22ft-transformed-800-000-luxury-home.html

At under eight feet wide, most people would automatically pity the owners of this narrow house. But far from being cramped, this home gives a new meaning to the phrase 'good things come in small packages', as behind its thin door is a sprawling property that actually spreads to 22ft wide. Tom and Sarah Tidbury have really made the most of their space after they purchased the period property in 2009.

Nicknamed 'the Wedge' as it starts off thin before growing wide at the rear, the couple have extended the 721 square feet of space and being granted the right for a home extension. And with a little creative thinking, the pair have transformed the 7ft 7ins wide place in Clapham, south west London, the Evening Standard reported. Despite appearances the home, which the Tidburys call 'the Tardis' because people cannot believe 'how big it is once you get inside', accommodates four bedrooms, a long, thin garden,and a generously spaced kitchen.

To appease planners, who would only grant the property a three floor extension if the roof couldn't been seen from the street, as it is in a conservation area, a 'ski-slope roof' was created, which slopes down to wards the back and has skylights to allow in.

There's certainly no slim pickings of where to relax in the house, as the roof meant they could maximise space by using slanted ceilings for bedrooms and a dining area built over the former patio, reached by walking through the kitchen, living room and the lobby. Clever use of space includes wall to ceiling shelves for books and photographs, while huge glass doors give the place a feeling of airiness, the Evening Standard reported.

A shower room and a dining area that opens on to the garden has meant that the value of the house has nearly double. It was purchased for £430,000, but is now estimated to be worth between £750,000 and £800,000. And their new spacious home with its increased value will undoubtedly be the envy of many a young would-be home-owner, who along with millions is struggling to get on to the property ladder.

Around one in three homeowners in England are pensioners as crippling house prices freeze younger generations off the property ladder, official figures revealed last week. In a sign of the property crisis facing young people, the Government’s English Housing Survey revealed homeownership has dropped to its lowest level since the 1980s. At its peak in 2003, 71 per cent of householders were ‘owner occupiers’.

Of the 14.4million homeowners in England, the largest number - by a considerable margin - are people aged 65 and over, equal to a record 30 per cent of the total. There are 4.3million homeowners in this age group, which is more than a million higher than the total number for any other age group. By comparison, there are just 2.6million ‘owner occupiers’ in the 35 to 44 age group, the age at which parents are raising a young family, with many desperate to do so in their own home. And the number between the age of 25 and 34, also with young families but likely to have had to pay an even higher price for their home, is nearly half this number at just 1.4million.

article-2367293-1ADC5173000005DC-864_634x856.jpg

article-2367293-1ADB9D32000005DC-307_634x475.jpg

...so a first time buyer could easily put their hands on £430, let alone £800k...for that!... Have the wail become estate agents?...its the second "article" about some novel house in the last 24 hours...

Edited by Dave Beans

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The poor quality of the article and grammar mistakes aside, this does represent the SE England housing madness quite well I suppose.

A shower room and a dining area that opens on to the garden has meant that the value of the house has nearly double.

Illiterately put, but you do have to ask how adding a shower room and dining area that opens on to a garden the size of a stamp means "that the value of the house has nearly double[d]" (The article was clearly written by a dribbling idiot, par for the course of such a disgusting little low brow rag like the Mail) :lol:

Imagine how a fire will rip through a place like this too, I would have trouble sleeping at night.

"Come to London, you can live in an alleyway for nearly £1 million" :huh:

Edited by JustAnotherProle

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http://www.dailymail...uxury-home.html

article-2367293-1ADC5173000005DC-864_634x856.jpg

article-2367293-1ADB9D32000005DC-307_634x475.jpg

...so a first time buyer could easily put their hands on £430, let alone £800k...for that!... Have the wail become estate agents?...its the second "article" about some novel house in the last 24 hours...

its the rustic sink that sold it for me....im calling with an offer now

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Its the drip, drip, drip of propaganda. After sufficient exposure to this propaganda the £20,000p.a. wage slave will start to believe that such a property at 40 times his salary is nothing exceptional. Next step accept that the meaning of his life is to fund a bloodsucking rentiers portfolio.....likely as not an MP. Job done.

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Its the drip, drip, drip of propaganda. After sufficient exposure to this propaganda the £20,000p.a. wage slave will start to believe that such a property at 40 times his salary is nothing exceptional. Next step accept that the meaning of his life is to fund a bloodsucking rentiers portfolio.....likely as not an MP. Job done.

The thing with buying a place like that is, what greater fool will pay more to buy it off you?.... all you can do is keep your fingers and toes crossed and hope there will be plenty. ;)

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The thing with buying a place like that is, what greater fool will pay more to buy it off you?.... all you can do is keep your fingers and toes crossed and hope there will be plenty. ;)

Just with posts on other threads tonight about being happy being humble. Less is more. Yet being totally priced out even on the humble-scale.

My younger brother recently met someone who lived at this house, prior to its conversion. There were discussing small houses and clever planning, and got onto the subject of this house. Not sure if they once owned it or rented it though.

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22' is 264 inches, or just under 3 times the frontage width. The rear photo with the grinning debt owners in the garden certainly does not show a 22' wide house (6.6 metres).

If anything, the roof with the skylights seems to indicate that the building is of approximately uniform width(the tile pattern is completely congruent with no sloping edges as might be expected if the building really was a wedge).

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22' is 264 inches, or just under 3 times the frontage width. The rear photo with the grinning debt owners in the garden certainly does not show a 22' wide house (6.6 metres).

If anything, the roof with the skylights seems to indicate that the building is of approximately uniform width(the tile pattern is completely congruent with no sloping edges as might be expected if the building really was a wedge).

It is the same width front and rear, about 8', just a bit bigger than a standard door.

Edited by davidg

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Arggghhh! It looks like the walls are closing in! Enough to give me claustrophobia.

:lol:

I knew this house came back to market a few months ago.

Sales Date: 16 May 2014. Price Paid: £837,500

Sales Date: 18 Dec 2009. Price Paid: £430,000

Source: Rightmove Sold Prices: http://www.rightmove.co.uk/house-prices/detailMatching.html?prop=28088898&sale=42837584&country=england

..reproduced with the permission of Land Registry

Found any HPI victims today? Bankers must be dragging buying victims into the banks again, like in 2003-07, forcing them to buy at such higher prices. <_<

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  • 243 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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