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Executive Sadman

The Ultimate Boomer

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Bit black and white if you don't mind me saying. To say that all grads have a sense of entitlement would be as stupid as saying no grads have a sense of entitlement. I am sure there were people that could have bought a small grotty terrace on a repayment mortgage but went for the quick fix and rented a much nicer house. This may have been because he felt the terrace was over valued or it may have been his feeling of entitlement pushed him away from the long slow route.

HTB is probably the dumbest policy the government has ever brought out. But it doesn't mean it wouldn't be worth using it.

5% down if house prices fall sell it at a loss in 5 years time and let the government take the hit. Ok you will have lost your 5% deposit but the saving in rent may compensate you for that. The calculator is you friend on that one.

The terrace likely was and still is over-valued, but everything has been thrown at preventing a HPC. Including for Junes of this world, moaning about their council tax.

Thanks for your encouragement with HTB; I'll get right on to my multiple applications for debt to bank and government debt provider on my back. I'm sure gubbermint will be happy to take the loss, and allow the buyer to sell at a loss.

I think the chart maybe inaccurate. You would have to take away peoples savings from their debt to get any meaningful result.

I still owe £70,000 on my mortgage but have £120,000 in savings and investments. Is that showing up on the graph?

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HTB is probably the dumbest policy the government has ever brought out. But it doesn't mean it wouldn't be worth using it.

5% down if house prices fall sell it at a loss in 5 years time and let the government take the hit. Ok you will have lost your 5% deposit but the saving in rent may compensate you for that. The calculator is you friend on that one.

Now you are thinking!

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I am sure there were people that could have bought a small grotty terrace on a repayment mortgage but went for the quick fix and rented a much nicer house. This may have been because he felt the terrace was over valued or it may have been his feeling of entitlement pushed him away from the long slow route.

Or it could have been as was my case that my work prospects would have been limited had I tied myself to a particular location. There are more reasons in the decision to rent or not other than whether a person feels like they deserve a nicer rented home.

What I wasn't expecting was that the government would make property unaffordable to 90% of the population unless they took on an irresponsible amount of debt. I rather foolishly expected a market to operate like a market, and could not foresee unaffordable items not reducing in price until they were affordable.

As to the question of entitlement, what should we feel entitled to in a developed nation? Clean running water? Medical treatment on the basis of need? Opportunity regardless of background? To have guaranteed access to a shelter we can call home for longer than an ast?

Seems to me the basis for what most feel they can have too (or are entitled to, it's not a dirty word) is based largely on what they see around them, or what they saw whilst growing up, or what their parents had. So yes I actually do feel entitled (he said the word! To the stocks!) to be able to earn access to a shelter I can call home and not have to rent having seen what every day simple low earning folk of my parents generation had access to.

Big whoop.

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Bit black and white if you don't mind me saying. To say that all grads have a sense of entitlement would be as stupid as saying no grads have a sense of entitlement. I am sure there were people that could have bought a small grotty terrace on a repayment mortgage but went for the quick fix and rented a much nicer house. This may have been because he felt the terrace was over valued or it may have been his feeling of entitlement pushed him away from the long slow route.

Or it could have been as was my case that my work prospects would have been limited had I tied myself to a particular location. There are more reasons in the decision to rent or not other than whether a person feels like they deserve a nicer rented home.

What I wasn't expecting was that the government would make property unaffordable to 90% of the population unless they took on an irresponsible amount of debt. I rather foolishly expected a market to operate like a market, and could not foresee unaffordable items not reducing in price until they were affordable.

As to the question of entitlement, what should we feel entitled to in a developed nation? Clean running water? Medical treatment on the basis of need? Opportunity regardless of background? To have guaranteed access to a shelter we can call home for longer than an ast?

Seems to me the basis for what most feel they can have too (or are entitled to, it's not a dirty word) is based largely on what they see around them, or what they saw whilst growing up, or what their parents had. So yes I actually do feel entitled (he said the word! To the stocks!) to be able to earn access to a shelter I can call home and not have to rent having seen what every day simple low earning folk of my parents generation had access to.

Big whoop.

I think it would have been fairer if you hadn't chopped off the first part of my post.

Edited by gf3

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no 20 something year old newly graduated would be able to own a detached house (unless they have well-heeled parents or inherit money). nor should they expect to be able to do more than rent a shared house or a bedsit. That is as it has always been.

I am sure no 20 something would swap places with this particular 72 year old and by the way they would also be entitled to the 25% reduction if living alone.

just saying

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no 20 something year old newly graduated would be able to own a detached house (unless they have well-heeled parents or inherit money). nor should they expect to be able to do more than rent a shared house or a bedsit. That is as it has always been.

I am sure no 20 something would swap places with this particular 72 year old and by the way they would also be entitled to the 25% reduction if living alone.

just saying

Did you see post #50? Are you willing to comment on that?

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no 20 something year old newly graduated would be able to own a detached house (unless they have well-heeled parents or inherit money). nor should they expect to be able to do more than rent a shared house or a bedsit. That is as it has always been.

I am sure no 20 something would swap places with this particular 72 year old and by the way they would also be entitled to the 25% reduction if living alone.

just saying

We are not talking about a 20 year old owning a detached house. But rather hundreds of thousands in their early to late 30's (note 30 years ago couples generally bought in their mid-20s) being UNABLE to buy a small, terraced or semi starter home, in a semi-decent area. Despite many of them earning above average salaries.

Also your attempt to portray her situation as someone who is living on the breadline is just plain ludicrous.

This woman is in her later stages of life and so has few of the life-costs that a youngster does. Here are some of the largest ones -

No rent/mortgage to pay.

No savings needed to cover unemployment (her income is guaranteed for life)

No need to save for a pension or accrue capital to draw down in retirement

No work related travel costs

No costs due to being time poor that come with working (e.g. eating at work or buying more expensive pre-prepared meals). She has all the time in the world.

No costs associated with finding a mate/life-partner (as any youngster knows these can be quite high)

Factor out all those costs out of a typical 25 year old's income, and her income is probably double what that 25 year old has left. Indeed the data bears this out. The current generation of retirees is the first to have a higher standard of living than those working.

Also compare her situation to the closest analogous one that occurs in our society, which has the closest cost-match to what she does. A single unemployed person. That person survives on ~1/3 of her income. Surviving on JSA is not pleasant but it is certainly doable. So someone with 3 times that with those same costs can easily live a good quality of life

So please don't say she's poor, her quality of life is as many correctly state one that most 20 somethings could only dream of. So in truth it's not others that have a breathtaking sense of entitlement. It's you that does. Because your so completely unaware of how much better this lady and (I presume yourself) have it compared to youngsters now.

Edited by alexw

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So in truth it's not others that have the breathtaking sense of entitlement. It's you that does. Because your so completely unaware of how much better this lady and (I presume yourself) have it compared to youngsters now.

They are spoilt.

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Guest eight

If you have no mortgage or rent to pay then £10k for a couple makes you rich.

At least, a lot richer than you were while paying a mortgage and bringing up a family. That's approximately my parents' situation: substantially richer on basic state pension than when bringing us up.

Mine too.

However had the current tax credits regime been around when I was growing up in the 80's I think my childhood would have been very different. A lot warmer, for a start.

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Has house, has savings, but doesnt like the idea of having to pay council tax. Didnt have any children who would contribute to her generations pensions.

Why not? Free bus passes, free tv license, a cheque from the govt each month for still having a pulse, may as well have free council services too.

Daily mail puke fest here

http://www.thisismoney.co.uk/news/article-2034499/Council-tax-June-Farrows-jail-pay.html

Another Boomer (well post boomer to be fair) posts an inter generational blame game thread.

Edited by campervanman

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Also your attempt to portray her situation as someone who is living on the breadline is just plain ludicrous.

This woman is in her later stages of life and so has few of the life-costs that a youngster does. Here are some of the largest ones -

No rent/mortgage to pay.

No savings needed to cover unemployment (her income is guaranteed for life)

No need to save for a pension or accrue capital to draw down in retirement

No work related travel costs

No costs due to being time poor that come with working (e.g. eating at work or buying more expensive pre-prepared meals). She has all the time in the world.

No costs associated with finding a mate/life-partner (as any youngster knows these can be quite high)

Factor out all those costs out of a typical 25 year old's income, and her income is probably double what that 25 year old has left.

Such well made points. I scratch my head and wonder why anybody would consider this woman needs help with her council tax. There are elderly people in far worse financial positions, but she even has an enhanced state pension, presumably through her late husbands contributions and a very secure financial position over all.

I am afraid that there is a generational bias in government policy towards the elderly. When you need the help the most in your pivital years 20s/30s there is no help. This is a very insecure time of your life, meanwhile when you are set up and secure you are deemed to need financial help. It doesn't make any sense to me at all. the elderly are vulnerable health wise, but this is a financial issue.

I think our attitudes to welfare hark back to a time when the el;derly were comparitively poor, but old habits and attitudes die hard,.

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Big fancy house = pay more.

+1

A house built to er house 3/4 people would in theory require at least three times more services than a one bed flat.

Whether one or four people are living there is pretty mute imo.

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+1

A house built to er house 3/4 people would in theory require at least three times more services than a one bed flat.

Whether one or four people are living there is pretty mute imo.

The house does not require the services it is people who use council services. I have never seen a house down my local library or taking a dip at the local pool. Tax everyone for council services and tax houses using an environment tax. That would make people pay for occupying too much house whilst holding councils accountable by everyone when they waste money.

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The house does not require the services it is people who use council services. I have never seen a house down my local library or taking a dip at the local pool. Tax everyone for council services and tax houses using an environment tax. That would make people pay for occupying too much house whilst holding councils accountable by everyone when they waste money.

Sort of the same is it not? Bigger houses use more council services like road/pavement frontage, streetlighting, verges to be mowed, diesel for bin lorries. It's a bit rough'n'ready butworks well in principle I think.

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Sort of the same is it not? Bigger houses use more council services like road/pavement frontage, streetlighting, verges to be mowed, diesel for bin lorries. It's a bit rough'n'ready butworks well in principle I think.

Hence an environment tax on properties for the elements of council spending that you are highlighting. But as I stated before, houses do not go to the library, swim, use schools, beat wives, etcetera, etcetera.... everyone should pay for those elements as this will make councils and individuals more accountable for their actions.

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Hence an environment tax on properties for the elements of council spending that you are highlighting. But as I stated before, houses do not go to the library, swim, use schools, beat wives, etcetera, etcetera.... everyone should pay for those elements as this will make councils and individuals more accountable for their actions.

I don't go to the library, swim, use schools or beat my wife. Can I have a discount?

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But remember council tax doesn't target big houses. It doesn't care about the size - only the value. Apparently if you have a nicer kitchen fitted, are nearby a good school, or have a pleasing display of twigs in a vase you use more services and thus must pay more. Perfect sense.

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Hence an environment tax on properties for the elements of council spending that you are highlighting. But as I stated before, houses do not go to the library, swim, use schools, beat wives, etcetera, etcetera.... everyone should pay for those elements as this will make councils and individuals more accountable for their actions.

Libraries and leisure services are a drop in the ocean as compared to education for the young and elderly welfare...and you aren't going to get any revenue from those services except a bit of charging on home helps and residential care homes.

Edited by crashmonitor

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refuse to be 'baited'

I know the reality of life on 10K (not exactly rich is it)

as I pointed out upstream :

I explained why the discount is 25% not 50% as would seem logical - I did not say it SHOULD be 50%

it is not just the older generation who get 25% off - any person living alone does.

lots of people get 100% or near enough off their council tax

there was no call to get personal about my circumstances (getting a bit like Mumsnet ) :D

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refuse to be 'baited'

I know the reality of life on 10K (not exactly rich is it)

as I pointed out upstream :

I explained why the discount is 25% not 50% as would seem logical - I did not say it SHOULD be 50%

it is not just the older generation who get 25% off - any person living alone does.

lots of people get 100% or near enough off their council tax

there was no call to get personal about my circumstances (getting a bit like Mumsnet ) :D

As I said before, care to comment on post #50? It's perfectly reasonable to take you to task over claims which don't stack up, I didn't get personal. Would you like to defend them? You are using a straw man of a twenty something expecting a big detached to say that thirty-something shouldn't be able to get one either, despite this being (in all likelihood) completely contrary to your own and your contemporaries' own personal experiences.

Edited by cheeznbreed

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I know the reality of life on 10K (not exactly rich is it)

Yes, it's rich.

By historic ore world standards, fantastically rich. Nor do you have to go back that far in history: compared to 1970s or earlier UK it's rich.

Even by modern standards it's pretty rich if you own a house outright so you have no rent or mortgage costs.

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  • 298 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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