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Benefit Cap 'could Be Lowered By £6,000'


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Benefit cap 'could be lowered by £6,000'

I cannot believe they set the cap level at what they say in their own words THE SAME AS A AVERAGE WORKING FAMILY would get.

Its a bit of a no brainier, Should i work for £26k and pay out bus fares , car parking , out of the house for 50 hours or should i sit out home and get the same with no outlay for work.

Lets start making not working less attractive.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-politics-23325667

Can anyone tell me, are dental and prescriptions etc included in this Cap, or is it still a add on which people on benefits still get.

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Excellent news have you got any links to prove it? (I really want to believe that is true).

Here's my favourite: My link

It's at the extreme end I know. I can supply loads of other less spectacular drops in the same area, but trawl property bee and you can find them yourself. Some parts of the London PRS are probably 80% housing benefit recipients. The cap has cut housing benefit by 80% for the largest properties in Central London. To imagine housing benefit cuts will have zero effect on rents in this city is quite bizarre.

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Here's my favourite: My link

It's at the extreme end I know. I can supply loads of other less spectacular drops in the same area, but trawl property bee and you can find them yourself. Some parts of the London PRS are probably 80% housing benefit recipients. The cap has cut housing benefit by 80% for the largest properties in Central London. To imagine housing benefit cuts will have zero effect on rents in this city is quite bizarre.

But that makes no sense whatsoever. The number of HB recipients claiming for this sort of high property is absolutely tiny.

The numbers claiming are small enough so as to have next to nil effect on rents for these properties.

https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/223081/hb_awards_march_2011.pdf

Edited by alexw
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July 16, 2013 London rents top inflation to rise at fastest rate in Britain http://www.cityam.com/article/london-rents-top-inflation-rise-fastest-rate-britain:

"RENTAL costs in the capital rose at twice the rate of the consumer price index (CPI) measure of inflation in the year between June 2012 and June 2013, ticking up by 4.9 per cent.

A home in greater London now costs an average of £1,270 to rent, 86.5 per cent more than the £681 average for the rest of the UK’s regions. South east London saw rents shot upward by 13.9 per cent in the same period.

The cost of renting a home is now 36.7 per cent more than it was in June 2009, a period in which there has been little growth in incomes, and other prices have also risen sharply."

All depends on where you're sitting I suppose. That's a pretty view though.

I like your patio table set! ;)

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But that makes no sense whatsoever. The number of HB recipients claiming for this sort of high property is absolutely tiny.

The numbers claiming are small enough so as to have next to nil effect on rents for these properties.

https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/223081/hb_awards_march_2011.pdf

Firstly, the figures in your link are from November 2010, so they are nearly 3 years out of date. Rents in London skyrocketed in the interim period. For a time until the cap, housing benefit would pay up to £2000 per week in Central London if you needed it. Now the absolute limit is round about £400 per week.

Secondly, I was asked to provide an example of rents collapsing in my area. I admitted it's an outlier, and I agree it's not a typical place that someone on HB will live in. But HB provides a floor to rents and a benchmark for properties further up the chain.

The two events are linked though. Up until the cap a typical family home in my area rented for about £3000 per month. That's £36K a year. You either had to be very rich or on benefits to pay that rent. It was out of reach of most ordinary families not entitled to benefits. The rich aren't interested in some of these places, and now HB claimants can't pay the rent, there is literally no market for these places.

I've lived and rented in my area for 14 years. I can't speak for the rest of London or the rest of the country, but I've never seen such a glut of rentals that I'm seeing now. I've no reason to lie and I'm just sharing what I'm seeing right now. If posters prefer to believe out-of-date government stats or press releases from Letting Industry PR agencies then I won't be offended. :huh:

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Firstly, the figures in your link are from November 2010, so they are nearly 3 years out of date. Rents in London skyrocketed in the interim period. For a time until the cap, housing benefit would pay up to £2000 per week in Central London if you needed it. Now the absolute limit is round about £400 per week.

Secondly, I was asked to provide an example of rents collapsing in my area. I admitted it's an outlier, and I agree it's not a typical place that someone on HB will live in. But HB provides a floor to rents and a benchmark for properties further up the chain.

The two events are linked though. Up until the cap a typical family home in my area rented for about £3000 per month. That's £36K a year. You either had to be very rich or on benefits to pay that rent. It was out of reach of most ordinary families not entitled to benefits. The rich aren't interested in some of these places, and now HB claimants can't pay the rent, there is literally no market for these places.

I've lived and rented in my area for 14 years. I can't speak for the rest of London or the rest of the country, but I've never seen such a glut of rentals that I'm seeing now. I've no reason to lie and I'm just sharing what I'm seeing right now. If posters prefer to believe out-of-date government stats or press releases from Letting Industry PR agencies then I won't be offended. :huh:

I am convinced. Of course if HB claimants can't pay the rent then the rent will have to be lowered

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Here's my favourite: My link

It's at the extreme end I know. I can supply loads of other less spectacular drops in the same area, but trawl property bee and you can find them yourself. Some parts of the London PRS are probably 80% housing benefit recipients. The cap has cut housing benefit by 80% for the largest properties in Central London. To imagine housing benefit cuts will have zero effect on rents in this city is quite bizarre.

Sadly there are lots of people can easily believe bizarre things. We give the most money to single mums in Europe and we have the most single mums - a lot of people believe there is no possible connection at all.

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What top ups.....I've never had a 'top up' in my life.

I was just saying that even if, because of your personal circumstances, you are in the position to qualify for £26k in benefits when not working, then you would still be better off working because of other government assistance such as Tax Credits which I've heard are very generous.

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Here's my favourite: My link

It's at the extreme end I know. I can supply loads of other less spectacular drops in the same area, but trawl property bee and you can find them yourself. Some parts of the London PRS are probably 80% housing benefit recipients. The cap has cut housing benefit by 80% for the largest properties in Central London. To imagine housing benefit cuts will have zero effect on rents in this city is quite bizarre.

Maybe I'm missing something (did the advert change?), but £1,385 per week / £6,000 per month for a 7 bed house in a so-so part of Ealing doesn't seem that much of a bargain? That's still £850 per bedroom per month ...

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Maybe I'm missing something (did the advert change?), but £1,385 per week / £6,000 per month for a 7 bed house in a so-so part of Ealing doesn't seem that much of a bargain? That's still £850 per bedroom per month ...

If you don't have property bee, you will have missed the other entries:

Thu May 23 14:21:42 2013 Price changed: from '£1,820 pw' to '£1,385 pw'

Wed Nov 28 16:46:32 2012 Status changed: from 'Available' to 'null'

Sat Nov 3 22:09:21 2012 Price changed: from '£2,300 pw' to '£1,820 pw'

Sat Sep 1 14:45:20 2012 Initial entry found.

You're right though - it's still not a bargain. Now, after the benefit cap, the only people who can pay these rents are the independently wealthy and those on expense accounts. Interesting times.

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If you don't have property bee, you will have missed the other entries:

Thu May 23 14:21:42 2013 Price changed: from '£1,820 pw' to '£1,385 pw'

Wed Nov 28 16:46:32 2012 Status changed: from 'Available' to 'null'

Sat Nov 3 22:09:21 2012 Price changed: from '£2,300 pw' to '£1,820 pw'

Sat Sep 1 14:45:20 2012 Initial entry found.

You're right though - it's still not a bargain. Now, after the benefit cap, the only people who can pay these rents are the independently wealthy and those on expense accounts. Interesting times.

And they might be slightly more choosy than someone who just wants a shelter to drink cider, sorry I mean look for work, in?

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  • 433 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
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      • Even
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      • up 5%



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