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Universal Credit New Thread.complete Disaster.


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25 minutes ago, spyguy said:

Britains benefit crisis.

Jesus. Not a single person claiming disability shows any form of disability. Drpression, breathlessness, vague unspecified stuff.

Scrap UC. Offer a system that is based on 2 years contribution, then goes after 6 months.

Put a 10y max lifetime claim.

 

Iatrogenic illness is rife though.

http://ssristories.net/archive/indexb6a1.html?sort=date&p=

John Nash got off all meds in 1970 and never took any since.

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1 hour ago, spyguy said:

Britains benefit crisis.

Jesus. Not a single person claiming disability shows any form of disability. Drpression, breathlessness, vague unspecified stuff.

Scrap UC. Offer a system that is based on 2 years contribution, then goes after 6 months.

Put a 10y max lifetime claim.

Well keep UC, but make it contribution-based and keep the lifetime claim. 

I take it you are referring to today's "Dispatches" on Channel 4:

Quote

Channel 4 Dispatches: The government announced plans to improve the Universal Credit system last autumn. Have the changes made a difference to the lives of people who rely on claim the benefit?

 

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On 07/05/2018 at 20:27, spyguy said:

Id doubt these people are on meds. Or actually depressed. 

Depression and anxiety are the post industrial economies bad back. 

All of the archived stories are about people who were taking medication. Depression and anxiety have always existed, psychiatry makes it worse.

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On 07/05/2018 at 20:27, spyguy said:

Depression and anxiety are the post industrial economies bad back.

To be fair depression is a serious business, when it's real I mean. I had a few years of it then it went away by itself. Can't imagine living with it your whole life.

Now I'm not depressed I'm just anxious, and get more anxious every time I look at the interest I'm getting on my savings.

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7 hours ago, Funn3r said:

To be fair depression is a serious business, when it's real I mean. I had a few years of it then it went away by itself. Can't imagine living with it your whole life.

Now I'm not depressed I'm just anxious, and get more anxious every time I look at the interest I'm getting on my savings.

Equallly genuine back pain is a really soul destroying conidtion.

But ......

People are just flocking to pick the hard to diagnose scams to get on the DLA scam.

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5 hours ago, spyguy said:

Equallly genuine back pain is a really soul destroying conidtion.

But ......

People are just flocking to pick the hard to diagnose scams to get on the DLA scam.

Indeed. Was sceptical of those claiming to have 'bad backs', but for the past 5 years I have been having issues with mine with no injury as such (chronic and constant shooting/burning pains in lower back and down leg, but I work, and have not claimed and have never claimed benefits) I'm more careful about how I treat others. The problem is that there's no test as such to quantify the pain and its relation to how much you can/can't do. It also fluctuates so you just know that people are making judgments about you by just seeing you on a better day. Tbh some days you wish you'd just have a limb broken because at least it would heal rather than live with the constant, energy draining pain.

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2 hours ago, fru-gal said:

Can people really get PIP for such things anymore? Surely it is hard enough to get PIP for a bad back, let alone something as abstract as depression? The problem is that depression, anxiety and the other mental health problems can be crippling. The reason why there is so much cynicism of people claiming is that for many years under nuLabour, benefits were given out like sweeties with no checks and with a lifetime award. What has happened is the genuinely in need don't get what they need and those that are just playing the system know what buttons to press.

There's huge differences between the Ne and the SE, and hige differences between the UK and the rest of Europe.

Its all down to DLA being a magic benefit token.

Theyve cracked down on new claimiant,s probbaly too hard.

But that particular horse is running around the fields - or driving its blue badge motability to the seaside.

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11 minutes ago, fru-gal said:

DLA claimants also now have to go through the whole PIP migration process and interview. No more sending off a form and getting a million year award with no checks ever.

Maybe the solution to DLA is to make it dependent on earnings - say pay out at 30% of average of last 10 years earnings.

If you are on benefits then they dont change.

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  • 1 month later...

Universal credit savaged by public spending watchdog

Quote

NAO says core claims about flagship welfare programme are based on unproven assumptions

The government’s ambitious change to the benefits system, universal credit, fails to deliver promised financial savings or employment benefits and leaves thousands of vulnerable claimants in hardship, according to the public spending watchdog.

The National Audit Office effectively demolishes ministerial claims for universal credit, concluding that the much-delayed flagship welfare programme may end up costing more than the benefit system it replaces, cannot prove it helps more claimants into work and is unlikely to ever deliver value for money.

The NAO report paints a damning picture of a system that despite more than £1bn in investment, eight years in development and a much hyped digital-only approach to transforming welfare, is still in many respects unwieldy, inefficient and reliant on basic, manual processes.

 

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It’s official: universal credit is a colossal, costly, hellish catastrophe Polly Toynbee - Polly Toynbee

Quote

The catastrophe of Iain Duncan Smith’s universal credit is laid out on the mortuary slab by the National Audit Office (NAO), the public spending watchdog. At phenomenal cost to the taxpayer, David Cameron and George Osborne backed this pointless upheaval that has inflicted untold suffering on claimants and yet achieves nothing measurable, says the national auditor’s autopsy report. It’s a breathtaking read.

------------------------

Rollout should have finished last year – but after eight years of failures, each greeted with hubris and denial by Duncan Smith and his department, universal credit still covers just 10% of claimants. Warnings came over and over that many would not cope with hideously complex online claim forms: sure enough the NAO says 43% have needed help – with no recompense for councils and charities struggling to provide it.

______________

On top of that, the slashing of working benefit rates ensured universal credit makes people worse off. For every extra pound people earn, they lose 63p in working credits.

 

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https://www.mumsnet.com/Talk/legal_money_matters/3273590-Tax-credits-help-please-very-stressed

We began claiming tax credits in February this year to keep us afloat and survive on my SMP. I worked in a nursery so don't earn much and my partner is a self-employed musician and earns next to nothing. 
However last September (2017, before we were claiming tax credits) my partner's mum bought us a house- she transferred about £300,000 from a trust fund to him 

 

 

 

https://www.mumsnet.com/Talk/legal_money_matters/3278046-tax-credits-please-help-seems-way-too-much-money-pic-attached

 

https://www.mumsnet.com/Talk/legal_money_matters/3200113-Universal-credit-I-appear-to-be-better-off-working-part-time-can-this-be-right

 

https://www.mumsnet.com/Talk/legal_money_matters/3272121-universal-credit

 

 

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On 11/05/2018 at 12:13, Jeremy424 said:

Indeed. Was sceptical of those claiming to have 'bad backs', but for the past 5 years I have been having issues with mine with no injury as such (chronic and constant shooting/burning pains in lower back and down leg, but I work, and have not claimed and have never claimed benefits) I'm more careful about how I treat others. The problem is that there's no test as such to quantify the pain and its relation to how much you can/can't do. It also fluctuates so you just know that people are making judgments about you by just seeing you on a better day. Tbh some days you wish you'd just have a limb broken because at least it would heal rather than live with the constant, energy draining pain.

Me too. I have the exact same symptoms, caused by tronchial bursitis and a bulging disc at the bottom of my spine. Like you said, some days are better than others, but when it's bad, it's bad.

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  • 3 weeks later...

This article is predominantly about UBI, but introduced me to the story about Speenhamland which has interesting resonance with TC/UC:

who-really-stands-to-win-from-universal-basic-income

Quote

In 1795, a group of magistrates gathered in the English village of Speenhamland to try to solve a social crisis brought on by the rising price of grain. The challenge was an increase in poverty, even among the employed.

Quote

The magistrates at Speenhamland devised a way of offering families measured help. Household incomes were topped up to cover the cost of living. A man got enough to buy three gallon loaves a week (about eight and a half pounds of bread), plus a loaf and a half for every other member of his household.

Quote

As the Speenhamland system took hold and spread across England, it turned into a parable of caution. The population nearly doubled. Thomas Malthus posited that the poverty subsidies allowed couples to rear families before their actual earnings allowed it.

 

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  • 2 months later...
6 minutes ago, Cryptotrader said:

Food bank use will soar after universal credit rollout, warns charity

While Teresa May keeps popping up, like a demented jack-in-the-box with a stuck record, cooing soothely about the 'just about managings' - the Universal Credit debacle continues.

Charity that relies on on funding/charity.

UK benefits needs replacing, simnplifying.

Equaly, working age people need to be working.

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4 minutes ago, Cryptotrader said:

Most people on benefits are working.

Full time or part time?  If part time surely they should be encouraged to work full time and claim less benefits?

I know quite a lot of people on tax credits who don't want to work full time, why should their lifestyle choice be subsidized?

Edited by iamnumerate
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2 minutes ago, iamnumerate said:

Full time or part time?  If part time surely they should be encouraged to work full time and claim less benefits?

I know quite a lot of people on tax credits who don't want to work full time, why should their lifestyle choice be subsidized? 

It amazes me how people can live in this Country and yet be so utterly ignorant about the lives of millions of their fellow countryfolk. Let me know how you could work full time in Wetherspoons or an Amazon fullfillment centre and survive without benefits? I'm allright, Jack and I read the Daily Mail!

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2 minutes ago, Cryptotrader said:

It amazes me how people can live in this Country and yet be so utterly ignorant about the lives of millions of their fellow countryfolk. Let me know how you could work full time in Wetherspoons or an Amazon fullfillment centre and survive without benefits? I'm allright, Jack and I read the Daily Mail!

Weird I was asking about the percentage of people who work part time and get benefits, and you start attacking what you think I think, without bothering to ask what I think.  Also I was asking about part time nothing to do with full time.

In case you are interested in what I think, I think people who work full time and need benefits should get them.  (Although I think housing should be cheaper so they need less or ideally none).

 

Now can you please answer my question

Quote

Full time or part time?  If part time surely they should be encouraged to work full time and claim less benefits?

I know quite a lot of people on tax credits who don't want to work full time, why should their lifestyle choice be subsidized?

 

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