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In the past twelve months the circulation of the Daily Express has fallen from almost 600,000 copies per day to 525,000 – a drop of over 12%.

Past circulation:

1993 = 1.4 million

1999 = 1.1 million

2004 = 900,000

2008 = 750,000

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In the past twelve months the circulation of the Daily Express has fallen from almost 600,000 copies per day to 525,000 – a drop of over 12%.

Past circulation:

1993 = 1.4 million

1999 = 1.1 million

2004 = 900,000

2008 = 750,000

All newspapers' circulation is falling. I know of one newspaper who, privately, the management now refer to it as a website with a paper supplement.

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All newspapers' circulation is falling. I know of one newspaper who, privately, the management now refer to it as a website with a paper supplement.

True, but some more than others.

The Daily Mail's circulation in 1993 was 1.7 million. By 1998 it had risen to roughly 2.4 million and it stands at 1.8 million today.

Over the past 20 years the Mail has gained in circulation whereas the Express has lost almost two thirds of its readership.

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There was a Daily Express TV commercial on the television yesterday. Think it was on during a break in Sky News.

Cringed me out.

http://vimeo.com/51949257

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True, but some more than others.

The Daily Mail's circulation in 1993 was 1.7 million. By 1998 it had risen to roughly 2.4 million and it stands at 1.8 million today.

Over the past 20 years the Mail has gained in circulation whereas the Express has lost almost two thirds of its readership.

Look away now if you are a journo or anyone else whose livelihood depends on newsprint:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_newspapers_in_the_United_Kingdom_by_circulation

I was chatting to Mrs cheeznbreed about this recently, we have known or now know of only 2 individuals of roughly our age(early-mid 30s) who take a daily paper. But, go up one/two generations, and both our parents' households, and almost all other relations/inlaws whose houses we have been in regularly enough to notice, have papers delivered or are bought daily (including, I must fess up, one avid Express reader).

I wondered whether it would be an age-related thing, but it seems most were having papers delivered before they were our age.

In fairness to newspapers, they are ill-suited to the demands of modern communications in many respects, although there is something fundamental about having a piece of paper rather than an editable online entry which might disappear completely at some point. If only they were not filled with the most idiotic nonsense, for the most part. There are plenty of real experts in almost any field, with no axe to grind, who are generous enough to share their considered views for free online. These people deserve to be successful with Ad revenues etc.

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Look away now if you are a journo or anyone else whose livelihood depends on newsprint:

http://en.wikipedia...._by_circulation

I was chatting to Mrs cheeznbreed about this recently, we have known or now know of only 2 individuals of roughly our age(early-mid 30s) who take a daily paper. But, go up one/two generations, and both our parents' households, and almost all other relations/inlaws whose houses we have been in regularly enough to notice, have papers delivered or are bought daily (including, I must fess up, one avid Express reader).

I wondered whether it would be an age-related thing, but it seems most were having papers delivered before they were our age.

In fairness to newspapers, they are ill-suited to the demands of modern communications in many respects, although there is something fundamental about having a piece of paper rather than an editable online entry which might disappear completely at some point. If only they were not filled with the most idiotic nonsense, for the most part. There are plenty of real experts in almost any field, with no axe to grind, who are generous enough to share their considered views for free online. These people deserve to be successful with Ad revenues etc.

Not saying I have not browsed through a paper in a coffee shop, or dentist waiting room, but I last bought a red top in the 80`s (not a knitted one) and probably last bought The Independent in the early 90`s ( Had a girlfriend who said it was a decent paper, still thought then I needed some source of "news") Now I see people reading Express/Daily whatever and just wonder what the f8uck is going on inside their heads?

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Not saying I have not browsed through a paper in a coffee shop, or dentist waiting room, but I last bought a red top in the 80`s (not a knitted one) and probably last bought The Independent in the early 90`s ( Had a girlfriend who said it was a decent paper, still thought then I needed some source of "news") Now I see people reading Express/Daily whatever and just wonder what the f8uck is going on inside their heads?

Probably "Joy".

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In the past 10 years, with declining sales and ad revenue, i believe that most newspapers have been unable to sustain keeping permanent investigative reporters on board (such as the Sunday Times Insight team). more and more, the papers rely on the internet, twitter, and other news feeds rather than unique contacts and sources. But then, so can we all, without having a newspaper filter it for us.

And, of course, we have tame reporters toeing the line at political briefings, for tit-bits from spin doctors, which became prevalent under Thatcher, and then Blair and Brown in particular.

it is ironic that the Independent, the one paper that refused to take part in these briefings, fared so badly. But then, it's years since I read that papaer, perhaps it has other problems.

The newspapers that survive will genuinely be supplements for websites.

In an electronic age where anyone can deliver news, often live with video, to anyone in the world, the slow, limited, superficial coverage from newspapers makes them an irrrelevance. I say that newspapers are essentially dead.

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Older people buy and read papers because that is what they have always done, anyway many don't have or want the technology to read the news at home or on the move......daily newspapers if you buy for up to date news is already old news by the time you read it....therefore newspapers have to diversify to appeal more to existing readers and new readers......telling the truth is a start. ;)

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Just watching that odious creep Kelvin Mckenzie reviewing the papers on Sky News. He thinks it wonderful that house prices are rising, cuz it gives people that feelgood factor.

The bankers' and politicians' wages are linked to house prices and monetary mass inflation, while the peasants' wages are linked to industrial production, which is down.

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  • 239 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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