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I wonder how many people like it really hot, e.g. 26+ degrees C? The weather forecasters seem to assume we all do - but I find it pretty uncomfortable - I much prefer it 20-22 degrees.

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I wonder how many people like it really hot, e.g. 26+ degrees C? The weather forecasters seem to assume we all do - but I find it pretty uncomfortable - I much prefer it 20-22 degrees.

Me too. It's 23 degrees here in Northern France and I don't stray too far from an air conditioner.

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I wonder how many people like it really hot, e.g. 26+ degrees C? The weather forecasters seem to assume we all do - but I find it pretty uncomfortable - I much prefer it 20-22 degrees.

Everyone else in my work seems too - including those born in England. I hate it, unless I have nothing to do and I am at home.

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I believe here in Galway it is the hottest place in the British Isles!

Sitting in a nice air conditioned office at the mo. On nice days the company get the icecream man to com around and we all get free snow cones :rolleyes: - It's good working here.

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I agree about the temperature - 22 is about right.

If anyone remembers the film Pleasantville, the weather man in that says something like

"It's another perfect day - high 72, low 72, not a cloud in the sky"

72 F works out at about 22 C and it is indeed a perfectly pleasant temperature!

(I'm typing this in my "home office" (read: bedroom) in an old 1900s house (private rented) and I'm baking to death as it's impossible to get the house cool enough even with all the doors and windows open. (in the winter we freeze)

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I wonder how many people like it really hot, e.g. 26+ degrees C? The weather forecasters seem to assume we all do - but I find it pretty uncomfortable - I much prefer it 20-22 degrees.

I'm one who likes it cool, either spring-like or autumnal. When people say to me 'Isn't this wonderful sunny hot weather?' I say,'No. It's horrible. I hate it.' I don't like the sun either. Surprisingly, people stop mentioning the weather to me. :)

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Love it sunny, love the heat. Sometimes find it a bit much but there is no way I'll moan about it being hot. I might say 'Christ it's hot today' but just as an observation.

Rather this, rather anything, than the often-mentioned in my posts 'never-ending grey dull cloudiness'.

Blue sky, UV-B, and women wearing ****** all. Love it.

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I was suffering at work today. I have a windowless, cupboard sized office, stacked with high-end computer equipment. No ventilation, no AC, and about 2kW of IT equipment. Even with a desk fan, I looked like I had run a marathon.

I've been harassing my manager for some air conditioning, but apparently the building has exceeded the capability of its electricity substation. No new electrical appliances can be installed until the new substation is installed, in about 12 months time and a cost of about £200k. (Interestingly, the customer has to pay for the electricity supply upgrade; the supplier won't just upgrade the supply because you want to buy more electricity from them).

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I was suffering at work today. I have a windowless, cupboard sized office, stacked with high-end computer equipment. No ventilation, no AC, and about 2kW of IT equipment. Even with a desk fan, I looked like I had run a marathon.

I've been harassing my manager for some air conditioning, but apparently the building has exceeded the capability of its electricity substation. No new electrical appliances can be installed until the new substation is installed, in about 12 months time and a cost of about £200k. (Interestingly, the customer has to pay for the electricity supply upgrade; the supplier won't just upgrade the supply because you want to buy more electricity from them).

Where's that? I was on North Tyneside today, it was about fifteen degrees!

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I was suffering at work today. I have a windowless, cupboard sized office, stacked with high-end computer equipment. No ventilation, no AC, and about 2kW of IT equipment. Even with a desk fan, I looked like I had run a marathon.

I've been harassing my manager for some air conditioning, but apparently the building has exceeded the capability of its electricity substation. No new electrical appliances can be installed until the new substation is installed, in about 12 months time and a cost of about £200k. (Interestingly, the customer has to pay for the electricity supply upgrade; the supplier won't just upgrade the supply because you want to buy more electricity from them).

How about optimizing the existing installation? LED lamps that sort of thing. Although you obviously know your stuff so I guess you've raised this suggestion? A small home A.C. unit wouldn't draw much current.

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You soft northern nancys! I walk to and from work each way all year, 33 degrees in 95% humidity in ther summer, 20 minutes. Took me a year to acclimatise and now it's fine....

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You soft northern nancys! I walk to and from work each way all year, 33 degrees in 95% humidity in ther summer, 20 minutes. Took me a year to acclimatise and now it's fine....

Acclimatisation is the key point. I irregularly visit south east Asia to visit the missus' folks under similar weather conditions. It's pretty hard work - particularly if travelling there from a British winter. Even playing ball with the kids leaves you absolutely drenched with sweat. I usually try and go out for a run early in the morning - and you can feel the temperature rising by the minute. Impossible to run by about 7.45am. Yet you see the locals out running in the middle of the afternoon.

But by about week 3, I'm starting to acclimatise. Trouble is, I then have to come back to the UK.

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You soft northern nancys! I walk to and from work each way all year, 33 degrees in 95% humidity in ther summer, 20 minutes. Took me a year to acclimatise and now it's fine....

Its actually been not far off that in sunny jockland this week and i have been cycling and running up hills all week - so there !! :D

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You soft northern nancys! I walk to and from work each way all year, 33 degrees in 95% humidity in ther summer, 20 minutes. Took me a year to acclimatise and now it's fine....

Just acclimatising is the key thing. I can't believe the weather presenters are talking about a 'heatwave'. I'm currently in South Wales which was one of the warmer/sunnier places yesterday and the weather was perfect. Actually it still got slightly cool in the evening to be sitting outside in the evening in t shirt and shorts. Go to somewhere like SE Asia and it takes a couple of weeks to get used to the heat and humidity. Also in very hot countries you start shifting activities to the cooler times when the sun is down. The thing with the British 'heatwave' is that it is probably still too cool at night to comfortably sleep completely out in the open most evenings.

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To be fair to the presenters - this is a bona fide heatwave.

Its all relative. Days in Scotland at 29c where a nice summer day is usually classed as anything above 18c = most definitely a heatwave.

Its similar temperatures here to southern Spain ffs !!

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To be fair to the presenters - this is a bona fide heatwave.

Its all relative. Days in Scotland at 29c where a nice summer day is usually classed as anything above 18c = most definitely a heatwave.

Its similar temperatures here to southern Spain ffs !!

Fair enough quote for Scotland I agree...

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To be fair to the presenters - this is a bona fide heatwave.

Its all relative. Days in Scotland at 29c where a nice summer day is usually classed as anything above 18c = most definitely a heatwave.

Its similar temperatures here to southern Spain ffs !!

And Southern Spain is far too hot at this time of year.

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I agree about the temperature - 22 is about right.

If anyone remembers the film Pleasantville, the weather man in that says something like

"It's another perfect day - high 72, low 72, not a cloud in the sky"

72 F works out at about 22 C and it is indeed a perfectly pleasant temperature!

(I'm typing this in my "home office" (read: bedroom) in an old 1900s house (private rented) and I'm baking to death as it's impossible to get the house cool enough even with all the doors and windows open. (in the winter we freeze)

It's about 30c here in Budapest and in August the temperature can get up to 40c. Anything up to about 35c is bearable for me, after that I have to put the AC on which is expensive.

Have you tried the following? Open all the doors and windows that don't get the sun, early in the morning (say from 7am until 10am) to air the building with cool air, then close them and keep the curtains drawn until the sun is off them. This 'shuts out' the heat and is the method used on the continent (the Brits tend to throw all the windows open in hot weather). If you have to have some air coming in, just open the windows on the shady side a little. If you have sash windows, open the top and bottom so that hot air can escape upwards.

Also you can make 'sunblinds' easily - just cut up an old cardboard box, and gaffa tape some tinfoil to one side. Use drawing pins to tack it to the window frame (or gaffa tape if it's upvc) with the tinfoil side facing outward. This blocks out the sun nicely and in winter you can use them the other way round to keep the room warm. This really does work.

Edited by Austin Allegro

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Also you can make 'sunblinds' easily - just cut up an old cardboard box, and gaffa tape some tinfoil to one side. Use drawing pins to tack it to the window frame (or gaffa tape if it's upvc) with the tinfoil side facing outward. This blocks out the sun nicely and in winter you can use them the other way round to keep the room warm. This really does work.

A TFH for you house? Cool.

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  • 243 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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