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Dave Beans

Top 10 Property No-No's

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http://www.telegraph.co.uk/property/propertymarket/10168770/Top-10-things-that-devalue-your-home.html

Cluttered children’s bedrooms

It sounds unlikely, but a messy child’s room can create such a bad impression on would-be buyers that it will knock £8,000 off the value of a typical house. This is according to a study carried out by the mortgage provider ING Direct. Make sure your kids memorise that figure and threaten to knock it off their pocket money if they don’t keep their rooms tidy.

Anti-social neighbours

You may be glad to be shot of your ghastly neighbours. But if the people buying your house get wind of quite how ghastly they are, it will hit you hard in the pocket. According to a recent survey by Halifax Home Insurance, anti-social neighbours can shave up to £31,000 off the value of an average property.

UPVC windows

They are a real eyesore, and replacing them will cost between £4,000 and £10,000 on an average sized property, explains Michael Holmes, author of Renovating for Profit. Unless would-be buyers are enamoured of UPVC for some reason, you can mentally deduct that amount from the value of your property.

Wind farms

Data released last year by the Valuation Office Agency reveals a number of home owners have successfully applied to have their properties placed in a lower council band because of their proximity to a wind farm. Hard evidence is difficult to come by, but one couple in Devon saw the value of their property reduced from £400,000 to £300,000.

Noisy pubs

They are fun to patronise, but they can put buyers off properties in the vicinity quicker than an attack by killer wasps. “The biggest, noisiest pubs can knock up to 20 per cent off the value of a property,” says Rob Lewis of central London estate agent WA Ellis. That equates to nearly £50,000 off the value of an average property.

Pebbledash

It is not just unattractive to look at, it has a serious impact on property prices. “A typical four-bedroom house in Wandsworth, normally worth £1.3m, would see its value reduced by 7 per cent, or £90,000, if the walls were pebbledashed,” says Robin Chatwin of Savills. In the case of an average priced property, the reduction in value can be put at around £20,000.

A bad Ofsted report

Everyone is familiar with the property premiums associated with popular school catchment areas. A good Ofsted report for a primary school can add around 8 per cent to the value of a property, says the Royal Institute of Chartered Surveyors. Expect a bad Ofsted report to have a correspondingly negative impact, lopping nearly £20,000 off the cost of an average property.

Flood risk

If your property is on a flood plain, buyers will almost certainly be aware of the fact and factor in worst-case scenarios when putting in an offer. As the average cost of flood damage is between £20,000 and £40,000, according to the Association of British Insurers, that gives a general idea of how much the value of a property is likely to be adversely affected.

The Tube

Good transport links are one thing, a train rattling past your windows is quite another. WA Ellis recently sold two similar properties on the same Chelsea street for £5.5 million and £3.2 million respectively, with the Tube being the main difference between them. Even in more modest streets, the Tube running at the end of your garden could wipe £50,000 off the asking price.

Electricity pylons

They are not just unsightly but, in many people’s eyes, a health risk. “I always mentally knock off around 30 per cent when I am valuing properties with pylons in the close vicinity,” says Jonathan Harington of Haringtons UK. That is the equivalent of £72,000 off the value of the average property.

...so no mention of...

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...then...

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Quite a list.

On that basis quite a few houses should be free then? If you a scruffy bedroom, noisy neighbours *and* a poor Ofsted report.

I can imagine Samantha's teachers getting lectured by her parents for reducing the value of their investment.

Edited by Secure Tenant

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UPVC windows? What's the problem with them?

Almost every single house in my not particularly down-at-heel area has them; they are totally standard nowadays.

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UPVC windows? What's the problem with them?

Almost every single house in my not particularly down-at-heel area has them; they are totally standard nowadays.

Agreed, I'd be knocking an offer down if I saw wooden (maintenance) or metal (likely old) frames. It's true to say that uPVC windows require replacement units eventually though, not quite 'fit and forget', unless it is possible to get uprated units fitted in the first place.

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It sounds unlikely, but a messy child’s room can create such a bad impression on would-be buyers that it will knock £8,000 off the value of a typical house. This is according to a study carried out by the mortgage provider ING Direct. Make sure your kids memorise that figure and threaten to knock it off their pocket money if they don’t keep their rooms tidy.

What's that meant to show, other than being lived in & loved? The rest, sure (the "tube" thing neglected to mention "must be in London", which would mean you'd have to pay me to live there), but I cannot see how this would negatively impact value. Surely a neutral?

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What's that meant to show, other than being lived in & loved? The rest, sure (the "tube" thing neglected to mention "must be in London", which would mean you'd have to pay me to live there), but I cannot see how this would negatively impact value. Surely a neutral?

I think half this rubbish is believed because of the TV property makeover programmes.

Perhaps there was, once, a time when a prospective buyer would have looked at an untidy bedroom and thought 'so what' *

Now it's "this bedroom is untidy, the presentation is flawed, I can knock £10k off what I offer / If I buy this place, all I have to do is tidy it, add a few twigs and make £10k profit."

One local estate agent describes every property in his window as 'A well-presented house..." as if that mattered one ****ing iota. **

* I still think 'so what'.

** do I get extra points for mixing Anglo-Saxon with Latin?

Edited by happy_renting

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WA Ellis recently sold two similar properties on the same Chelsea street for £5.5 million and £3.2 million respectively, with the Tube being the main difference between them.

A tube line in Chelsea? When did that happen?

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No parking facilities on or off property.

High maintenance fees (leasehold) that only ever go up.

Noisy dirty motorway or main road outside or nearby.

Being excessively overlooked.

Low natural light levels. ;)

Edit to say:....the not so good things that can't be changed.....the not so good property the type BTLers tend to buy to let someone else let and live in them (not them)......income generating rather than growth accumulating, they are in it for the long-term, a property pension that lasts a lifetime? :blink:

Edited by winkie

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Lol at upvc windows being bad. I'll sit indoors in my toasty house on a freezing winters day, while the author of the article puts tape and cling film on his windows because they have warped or rotted.

And lol at thinking that London is the only place that people buy houses.

Edited by Superted187

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Maybe the author actually thinks that tube is a synonym of train.

Maybe they think that the tube goes all over England, or Britain, or whatever they call it nowadays.

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UPVC windows? What's the problem with them?

Almost every single house in my not particularly down-at-heel area has them; they are totally standard nowadays.

I think we are talking sash windows replaced by plastic on period buildings. Otherwise totally agree with you, anything post about 1930 is better plastic.

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I read the wind farms one wrong....

Having not seen the sub heading. I assumed that people were getting spanked for 100K when they came to sell because they were now an E as opposed to a G, for example.

Indeed, I believe people will take the council tax band into account when they make an offer. Low should make it more appealing, but then no one wants to pay half a million quid for an E, as it is basically saying it should be circa 300k.

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Maybe they think that the tube goes all over England, or Britain, or whatever they call it nowadays.

Well it does go all the way oop'north - to Watford, no less.

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Lol at upvc windows being bad. I'll sit indoors in my toasty house on a freezing winters day, while the author of the article puts tape and cling film on his windows because they have warped or rotted.

Exactly. The UPVC one is the only one I can't agree with. Ok, they'd look pretty shocking on the £5m Chelsea townhouse that this article seems to be concentrating on, buy for the 30s semis through to modern larger detached houses that most of the population live in, they are a good option*.

*unless of course they are UPVC painted in that fake woodgrain effect.

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Some genuine blights.

UPVC, say no more (than other HPCers have already posted in this thread).

Some fashion things: pebbledash isn't inherently bad, it's just a fashion of another era, and today's image of it is dominated by old pebbledash that hasn't been cleaned, let alone maintained, for half a lifetime.

And wind farms? Well, given the torygraph's relentless campaigning against them, they just had to get that in and invent a price effect.

Tube? Pylons? All a matter of degree. If pylons are near/powerful enough to hum in the house then I'd be bothered. But what about roads? A main road on your doorstep is a bigger blight than anything short of neighbours-from-hell.

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Some fashion things: pebbledash isn't inherently bad, it's just a fashion of another era, and today's image of it is dominated by old pebbledash that hasn't been cleaned, let alone maintained, for half a lifetime.

I wonder whether this comes down to the fact that the smooth stucco was a Georgian fad, so smooth stucco must be good. Meanwhile to bind the mortar with a dash is a permanent solution to cracking and a far superior finish which can last for a 100 years unblemished. Meanwhile the million pound stucco homes of Brighton and London are constantly cracking and shedding their stucco exteriors and must be a bloody nightmare for their owners.

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I wonder whether this comes down to the fact that the smooth stucco was a Georgian fad, so smooth stucco must be good. Meanwhile to bind the mortar with a dash is a permanent solution to cracking and a far superior finish which can last for a 100 years unblemished. Meanwhile the million pound stucco homes of Brighton and London are constantly cracking and shedding their stucco exteriors and must be a bloody nightmare for their owners.

I've thought similar thoughts about a thatched roof. It ought to be something which seriously impairs the selling price due to the maintenance required.

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When house prices are rising people overlook even glaring problems. But when prices are falling the market gets picky.

That's what I saw in the 89-95 crash. North facing or overlooked gardens, unbalanced extensions (too many bedrooms, not enough bathrooms), no off-street parking; any of these and a property would languish for years unsold or go at a steep discount. But the well maintained, well laid out, liveable properties still found buyers.

What's always surprised me is that this kind of low level blight is rarely reflected in the price. Simplistic EA's base valuations on location and number of bedrooms. But cleverer or more experienced buyers look beyond the headlines and wait for the better property...even though it can be in the same price band as a real shocker.

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article was written in the telegraph, and quoting ea in wandsworth, so victorian house with upvc windows, knock money off.

truth is when the telegragh talks property they ask a posh expert, and the answer will come from some guy living in chelsea. or the article will be about rising prices in sussex. there are other parts of the country, what about falling prices in rochdale.

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article was written in the telegraph, and quoting ea in wandsworth, so victorian house with upvc windows, knock money off.

truth is when the telegragh talks property they ask a posh expert, and the answer will come from some guy living in chelsea. or the article will be about rising prices in sussex. there are other parts of the country, what about falling prices in rochdale.

You can get some excellent uvpc sash windows some are even double glazed with smooth running operation and brushes to keep out drafts, no painting wood effect appearance.......very energy efficient and nobody would guess they were plastic......made them in the 3d printer. ;)

pvc-sash3.jpg

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You can get some excellent uvpc sash windows some are even double glazed with smooth running operation and brushes to keep out drafts, no painting wood effect appearance.......very energy efficient and nobody would guess they were plastic......made them in the 3d printer. ;)

pvc-sash3.jpg

Only the English could put authenticity over practicality.

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Only the English could put authenticity over practicality.

You say that but sash windows are very practical.....they stop small children climbing out but still let fresh air and light in.....very adaptable, and yes they can be cleaned both inside and out. ;)

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  • 238 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

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      • down 5% +
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