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Saving For a Space Ship

Mary Portas Plan To Convert Retail Units Into Homes

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http://www.guardian.co.uk/business/2013/jul/09/mary-portas-pilots-retail-homes

....The latest review of the Portas Pilots – a scheme led by retail guru and '"Queen of Shops" Mary Portas, to revive struggling retail centres – says there will be a consultation over the next six months on further relaxing planning regulations, to allow the conversion of retail space on minor thoroughfares running off high streets into residential property.

Eighteen months ago, Portas completed her review into the future of the nation's high streets, aiming to tackle soaring shop vacancy rates and boost the number of small and independent retailers in town centres.

The prime minister then asked the Department for Communities and Local Government to lead the response to her recommendations, including setting up 27 Portas Pilots.

Last year, the government increased the permitted development for flats created above shops, allowing developers to create two flats instead of just one above shops without planning permission.

The new report is exploring ways for businesses to find new premises more quickly, urging landlords to be more flexible in accommodating businesses and offering shorter leases, with the potential to increase housing on the high street.

The report said: "Together these reforms provide a substantial opportunity to bring more life into town centres and increase footfall."

The government has also launched the Future High Streets Forum to build on the learning and experiences from the pilots. The Forum brings together leaders from retail, property, business, academics, third sector, civil society and government to better understand the competition town centres across the country....

It was also revealed that the Portas scheme to revitalise ailing high streets has failed to stop the rot (So sack her !)– with 10 out of the 12 towns so far selected to share £1.2m of taxpayers' cash seeing an increase in empty shopping outlets. The towns – Bedford, Croydon, Dartford, Liskeard, Market Rasen, Nelson, Newbiggin-by-the-Sea, Stockport, Stockton-on-Tees and Wolverhampton – together saw more than 95 units close. .......

.....A DCLG spokeswoman said that conversions of shops into residential property – leading to more residents – could rejuvenate the high street. The report also says the government will continue to explore further ways of making the most of flats above shops. ...

....charity Shelter – which has a campaign for affordable homes – welcomed the move but stressed that any new accommodation should be a carefully planned, not be a sticking plaster

Edited by Saving For a Space Ship

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I have read the Portas Report cover to cover. It contains some well researched and articulate chapters followed by garbled and disjointed recommendations that looked like they were scribbled down in an afternoon. As a strategic document it is a very poor piece of work. In terms of results it has been a pointless exercise, but I suppose if the government wanted a bit of window dressing then Mary Portas would be a good choice to do it.

Edited by Orsino

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Thinking on the hoof here, but I'm getting the feeling that the reason why nothing is improving is because too much attention is being given to 'fixing the problem' whereas what needs to happen is the system must be simplified so that things can evolve more organically.

Should we move away from reactionary policy and attempt to model a more elegant and simplified system of govt, tax, welfare, etc, that is robust enough to withstand the ebb and flow of our collective economic decisions?

Constantly sending in the Portas of the world to fix the problem risks another layer of complexity that distorts the true reflection of what is happening. Every layer obscures the problem further so that finding a solution becomes that much harder.

Does anyone long for a government that mostly does nothing?

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, to allow the conversion of retail space on minor thoroughfares running off high streets into residential property.

In other words to get rid of smaller retail units with private landlords and lower rents, reduce competition, forcing smaller independents out of town centres and effectively give free money to large commerical landlords and chain retailers.

Stupid bl00dy woman.

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Thinking on the hoof here, but I'm getting the feeling that the reason why nothing is improving is because too much attention is being given to 'fixing the problem' whereas what needs to happen is the system must be simplified so that things can evolve more organically.

Should we move away from reactionary policy and attempt to model a more elegant and simplified system of govt, tax, welfare, etc, that is robust enough to withstand the ebb and flow of our collective economic decisions?

Constantly sending in the Portas of the world to fix the problem risks another layer of complexity that distorts the true reflection of what is happening. Every layer obscures the problem further so that finding a solution becomes that much harder.

Does anyone long for a government that mostly does nothing?

We voted with our feet when we decided to buy everything in big tin sheds.

Revert failing commercial units back into residential or "work/live" units.

We are massively over retailed in this country.

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In other words to get rid of smaller retail units with private landlords and lower rents, reduce competition, forcing smaller independents out of town centres and effectively give free money to large commerical landlords and chain retailers.

Stupid bl00dy woman.

not really, she's had a good job and her name in the papers.

Stupid are the ones that think shops appear out of the mist...People buy things they want and need....the former is they have spare cash, the latter by neccessity..

Housing costs are sucking the incomes of most, low interest rates are sucking the retired and savers dry, but the City is richer than ever...go figure.

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So the solution to failing shops on the high street is to make them into homes? Wouldn't that technically mean they were still failing shops?

What do we need high streets for? The answer to that dictates the solution.

Out of town shopping centres and tesco have taken the high street away from the high street.

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What do we need high streets for? The answer to that dictates the solution.

Out of town shopping centres and tesco have taken the high street away from the high street.

...you don't know what you have lost, until it's gone.....don't use it, lose it.

...down to the local communities if they want or can use them......the big corporates prefer you don't, councils don't seem to care one way or the other as long as the big corporates pay them. ;)

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What do we need high streets for? The answer to that dictates the solution.

Out of town shopping centres and tesco have taken the high street away from the high street.

..as much... the internet ...out of town shops have become pick up stations for internet ordering ...I'm not driving in to town to pay to park..no thank you ...over to the greedy councils and their exhorbitant salaries financed by car park fees..... :rolleyes:

Edited by South Lorne

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  • 246 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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