Jump to content
House Price Crash Forum

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

interestrateripoff

A Lesson In Air Safety: Out In 90 Seconds

Recommended Posts

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/07/09/business/a-lesson-in-air-safety-out-in-90-seconds.html?ref=business&_r=0

As investigators work to determine the cause (or, more likely, causes) of the crash of Asiana Flight 214 that killed two and injured 180 at San Francisco International Airport on Saturday, people with expertise in aviation safety, or with personal experience in aviation disasters, have been shaking their heads in wonder. How could so many have evacuated that airplane alive? And what can be learned about aviation safety from this incident?

Asiana flight attendants have won wide praise for their performance. Ms. Mayo and others are amazed that it took only about 90 seconds to get everyone off that plane, which was carrying 291 passengers and 16 crew. The evacuation was also aided by some passengers who by and large remained calm on an airplane that was on fire, filled with smoke, its tail section broken off, with several of its emergency evacuation slides malfunctioning.

For passengers, some basic lessons were firmly reinforced. These include following crew members’ instructions in an emergency and the overall importance of what the safety experts call situational awareness. Routinely, on any flight, we should know exactly where those exit doors are that the flight attendants keep trying to point out during the usually ignored safety demonstrations. We should be asking ourselves, if an emergency occurred what would I do? If I’m in or near an exit row, can I open that door?

Video of crash

This crash certainly says a lot about the strength of the aircraft and that everyone clearly remained focussed on what to do.

Full credit has to go to flight crew for getting everyone off.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The passengers on the plane were probably the main reason.

I can't imagine an Italian airline would have been quite so calm and composed. (No offence to Italians but you know what i mean)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The passengers on the plane were probably the main reason.

I can't imagine an Italian airline would have been quite so calm and composed. (No offence to Italians but you know what i mean)

Pull the race card, why don't you? :lol:

What about the Scots who saved their duty-free?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Pull the race card, why don't you? :lol:

What about the Scots who saved their duty-free?

Not sure. Us brits do tend to follow rules - sometimes. Queuing etc.

I imagine a Bulgarian plane would be a nightmare.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not sure. Us brits do tend to follow rules - sometimes. Queuing etc.

I imagine a Bulgarian plane would be a nightmare.

East Europeans would probably still be applauding the landing as the chutes were being deployed.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

East Europeans would probably still be applauding the landing as the chutes were being deployed.

They don't seem to do queues or orderly fashion very often.

The Scottish one would be interesting. Guaranteed not a drop of duty free would be left behind.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not sure. Us brits do tend to follow rules - sometimes. Queuing etc.

I imagine a Bulgarian plane would be a nightmare.

"Us Brits?" you haven't won any tennis! :lol:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you see how much the aircraft tumbled before coming to rest, it is astonishing that anyone survived at all.

For the cabin crew to have then organised any evacuation is admirable in the extreme, No doubt some of them were injured.

We might patronisingly call them 'trolly dollies' but they certainly showed their professionalism in this incident.

Declaration: I used to date a Dan-Air air hostess in my early 20's. Very good with exits and entrances.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Pull the race card, why don't you? :lol:

What about the Scots who saved their duty-free?

What if half Scottish and half Italian?

The best chance of survival is by being aware of your surroundings, working out an exit plan if the worst happened, the same as you would do if you stayed in an hotel, knowing where the staircases are, how would you exit if in the dark turn left or right, how far etc.....same for a crowded club or building you visit....forewarned is forearmed....much like life itself.

They are saying sitting in the cheaper seats at the rear of the plane have been slightly safer in most air accidents.

http://www.popularmechanics.com/technology/aviation/safety/4219452

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What if half Scottish and half Italian?

The best chance of survival is by being aware of your surroundings, working out an exit plan if the worst happened, the same as you would do if you stayed in an hotel, knowing where the staircases are, how would you exit if in the dark turn left or right, how far etc.....same for a crowded club or building you visit....forewarned is forearmed....much like life itself.

They are saying sitting in the cheaper seats at the rear of the plane have been slightly safer in most air accidents.

http://www.popularmechanics.com/technology/aviation/safety/4219452

On the other hand, the aircon blows air into the front of the cabin and all the way down. So when it reaches the last seat, you're breathing in the germs on the 300 people sat in front of you.

Could be tricky to work out if statistically the better survival rate in the event of a crash outweighs the added risk of swallowing a nasty bug.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I keep trying to buy the seat next to the black box, but they won't let me....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The cabin crew did a remarkable job particularly as two escape slides inflated inside the aircraft and had to be deflated with an axe to free a trapped member of the cabin crew.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I keep trying to buy the seat next to the black box, but they won't let me....

It's flying to somewhere called Terminal that spooks me..

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's flying to somewhere called Terminal that spooks me..

In the mid-80s I heard an announcement at Gatwick that started: "All passengers for Dan Air to Berne..."

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What this and every other evacuation incident says to me is that airlines need to crack down on the practice of allocating emergency exit seats to people based on their frequent flyer status rather than their ability to open the door and get themselves through it ASAP. Delta is particularly bad in this respect. On a flight last week I was in an exit row next to a couple in their 70s. The husband needed a walking stick to make it down the aisle, and took the window seat (i.e. it would have been him who had to operate the door - weighing 52lbs according to the notice on it - in an evacuation). Both were conversing in Spanish and appeared to speak no English (they couldn't answer the 'chicken or pasta?' question when the meals came round). Conversation overheard between flight attendants in the aisle: 'I'm worried about 29A and B ... he seems rather frail'. Other flight attendant shows her a printout: 'Look at this ... they're both platinums ... they've spent the value of my house on plane tickets!' ... 'We'd better run this past Randy' ... 'No, leave 'em, it'll be OK'.

I would be very interested to know if any lives have actually been lost (or injuries perpetrated) because the occupant(s) of the exit row were incapable of doing what required of them, thereby putting that emergency exit out of use. I'm sure it must have happened.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • 238 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.