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Green Deal 'could Lead To Deadly Summer Overheating'

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http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-politics-23180965

Temperatures could soar to dangerously high levels in some homes insulated under the government's flagship Green Deal scheme, experts have warned.

Energy-saving measures designed to save on winter fuel bills and protect the environment could pose a risk to health during summer heatwaves, they add.

The government says it is aware of the problem and is taking steps to prevent overheating in Green Deal properties.

Homes in densely populated urban areas such as London are most at risk.

Heat can build up during the day and has nowhere to escape at night leading to poor air quality and a greater risk of heat stress for the occupants which, in extreme cases, can kill.

More news from the Daily Mash....

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Might be a problem if people had taken up the green deal.

I read somewhere last week that only 0.6% of Green Deal Surveys had resulted in work being carried out under the scheme.

ETA: In fact its right there at the bottom of the article, 38259 assessments, only 241 instructions.

Edited by Caveat Mortgagor

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So if these properties are well insulated...

And it is hotter (too hot) on the outside than inside....

What is the problem?

And if there really is a problem (other than poor journalism) - why does it apply to the tiny number of green deal houses and not the massive number of other insulated houses?

If they are actually saying that the problem is poor ventilation, then as long as they didn't brick up the windows under the green deal there is surely a quite simple solution.

Y

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take shower, bath, damp cloth to the head....

drink lots.

wear little.

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So if these properties are well insulated...

And it is hotter (too hot) on the outside than inside....

What is the problem?

And if there really is a problem (other than poor journalism) - why does it apply to the tiny number of green deal houses and not the massive number of other insulated houses?

If they are actually saying that the problem is poor ventilation, then as long as they didn't brick up the windows under the green deal there is surely a quite simple solution.

Y

+1

After heavily insulating 3 houses (one a terrace, the other 2 detatched) I always noticed how much cooler they were in hot weather. Blinds hep as well in reducing heat gain through south facing windows.

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+1

After heavily insulating 3 houses (one a terrace, the other 2 detatched) I always noticed how much cooler they were in hot weather. Blinds hep as well in reducing heat gain through south facing windows.

Exactly......good insulation keeps out the cold as well as the heat. ;)

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The new build flats are a problem for me. High up, the sun streaming in and few windows. Some are built with windows that open only a small amount. They get very hot . The heat builds up during the day and then releases at night. Very humid. Nothing to do with insulating as far as I know. Just bad design.

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But once any heat gets in...

Much LESS heat will 'get in' to a well insulated house when outside temperatures are high. Therefore the insulation helps keep it cool. Having decent shutters on the windows or maybe awnings will specifically help for the purposes of keeping the house cool, otherwise keeping the curtains closed in direct sunlight is recommended to stop heat buildup from the sun.

My parents recently got a massive amount of new insulation in their loft and since then, their house has been noticeably cooler than it would have been previously during the recent spells of warm weather. This will hopefully translate to a warmer house in Winter.

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The new build flats are a problem for me. High up, the sun streaming in and few windows. Some are built with windows that open only a small amount. They get very hot . The heat builds up during the day and then releases at night. Very humid. Nothing to do with insulating as far as I know. Just bad design.

Those ghastly tilt and turn windows are the worst offenders. There's no way to leave them properly open - they don't fasten back. Some salesman once tried to convince me to order them - he said the minute opening was 'sufficient for ventilation'. Not for me it isn't.

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The new build flats are a problem for me. High up, the sun streaming in and few windows. Some are built with windows that open only a small amount. They get very hot . The heat builds up during the day and then releases at night. Very humid. Nothing to do with insulating as far as I know. Just bad design.

My sixties built ground floor is nice and cool at the moment. However I guess the people on the top floor are cooking at the moment. Indeed many had their windows wide open in the depths of winter (heated by other people's heat).

Ought to be some system using heat pumps where you could use some of the excess heat, to heat water or something, but I doubt anyone can be bothered.

Edited by Secure Tenant

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take shower, bath, damp cloth to the head....

drink lots.

wear little.

I'm hot in here. Big, south-facing windows catch the sun.

It's still a lot cooler than temperatures I routinely experienced in the Italian summer. I wonder how anyone survives in countries naturally much hotter than ours?

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I'm hot in here. Big, south-facing windows catch the sun.

It's still a lot cooler than temperatures I routinely experienced in the Italian summer. I wonder how anyone survives in countries naturally much hotter than ours?

Father lived in the Charente in an old farm house place (pretty modest) and even lived through that notorious summer which killed off loads of people.

Old farm place, windows one side only and not massively big, thickish walls with shutters of course. Also originally I don't think French peasants lived upstairs in those places.

Edited by Secure Tenant

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Ought to be some system using heat pumps where you could use some of the excess heat, to heat water or something, but I doubt anyone can be bothered.

Heat water?

It's in these conditions you want your water cold! My friend who has a solar hot water panel benefits from it for most of the year (her gas bills are nil for much of the year and reduced even in the depths of winter), but right now most of the heat just goes to waste.

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Heat water?

It's in these conditions you want your water cold! My friend who has a solar hot water panel benefits from it for most of the year (her gas bills are nil for much of the year and reduced even in the depths of winter), but right now most of the heat just goes to waste.

We are not all like you bathing in freezing streams and walking around in shorts in the depths of winter Porca! :P

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Father lived in the Charente in an old farm house place (pretty modest) and even lived through that notorious summer which killed off loads of people.

Old farm place, windows one side only and not massively big, thickish walls. Also originally I don't think French peasants lived upstairs in those places.

Sure, some places are cooler than others.

The year I left Cambridge, we went cycletouring for a summer holiday (a journey I sometimes describe as Cambridge to Oxford via Edinburgh and lots of other nice places). Towards the end we had a heatwave. We found ourselves getting up early, pedalling just a short distance to arrive in the next town by about 7, and then taking refuge in the coolest place in town. Fortunately the cathedrals in Gloucester, Worcester and Hereford are well worth a visit, as well as being pleasantly cool.

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ETA: In fact its right there at the bottom of the article, 38259 assessments, only 241 instructions.

Is that for real? Another high profile government policy that amounts to f-all?

Hasn't it been going for a few years too? I wonder what the set-up / admin fees were?

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The year I left Cambridge, we went cycletouring for a summer holiday

Sounds like the opening line voice-over of a Huw Grant style period drama film.

I assume you rode "sit up and beg" bicycles, wore monocles, striped jackets and boater hats and had the servants run along behind with the picnic?

Y

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Sure, some places are cooler than others.

The year I left Cambridge, we went cycletouring for a summer holiday (a journey I sometimes describe as Cambridge to Oxford via Edinburgh and lots of other nice places). Towards the end we had a heatwave. We found ourselves getting up early, pedalling just a short distance to arrive in the next town by about 7, and then taking refuge in the coolest place in town. Fortunately the cathedrals in Gloucester, Worcester and Hereford are well worth a visit, as well as being pleasantly cool.

Also there is a handy pub nearby! :blink:

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  • 239 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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